2 blockbusters among Supreme Court's last cases

Associated Press
People wait outside the Supreme Court in Washington as key decisions are expected to be announced Monday, June 24, 2013. At the end of the court's term, several major cases are still outstanding that could have widespread political impact on same-sex marriage, voting rights, and affirmative action. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court resolved five cases, including affirmative action, on Monday. That leaves disputes about gay marriage and voting rights among the six remaining cases. The justices are meeting again Tuesday to issue some opinions and will convene at least one more time.

A look at some of the cases:

—Gay marriage: Actually two cases. One is a challenge to California's constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. The other is an attack on a provision of federal law that prevents legally married gay couples from receiving a range of tax, health and pension benefits.

—Voting rights: A suburb of Birmingham, Ala., wants the court to end the nearly 50-year-old requirement for some state and local governments, mainly in the South and with a history of discrimination in voting, to get the advance approval of any changes in the way they hold elections.

—Native American adoption: A wrenching dispute over who gets custody of Native American girl — her biological father or the adoptive couple who cared for her until she was 2. The case involves the interpretation of a 1978 law intended to prevent American Indian children from being taken from their homes and typically placed with non-Indian adoptive or foster parents.

—Private property: A Florida property owner wants compensation, under the Constitution's requirement that the government must pay if it takes someone's property, for a local government's refusal to issue a development permit.

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