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Scott Willens, who joined the United States Army three days after the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, pauses by the South Pool of the World Trade Center Memorial during the 11th anniversary observance, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2012 in New York. (AP Photo/Justin Lane, Pool)
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NEW YORK (AP) — Americans marked the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks Tuesday in familiar but subdued ceremonies that put grieving families ahead of politicians and suggested it's time to move on after a decade of remembrance. As in past years, thousands gathered at the World Trade Center site in New York, the Pentagon and Shanksville, Pa., to read the names of nearly 3,000 victims killed in the worst terror attack in U.S. history.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential candidates are taking a break from their partisan attacks — but not all their politicking — to remember the 9/11 anniversary. President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney pulled their negative ads and avoided appearing at campaign rallies in honor of the 11th anniversary of the terrorist strike. But Obama's camp sent former President Bill Clinton to swing-state Florida for an evening rally eight weeks before Election Day. And the day offered Romney a chance in a speech to a meeting of the National Guard to address criticism that he didn't include a salute to the troops or reference the war in Afghanistan in his convention speech.

ATLANTA (AP) — For decades, Southerners put a firm imprint on national politics from both sides of the aisle, holding the White House for 25 of the past 50 years and producing a legion of Capitol Hill giants during the 20th century. But that kind of obvious power has waned as Democrats and Republicans in the region navigate the consequences of tidal shifts in demographics, migration and party identity. This is the second consecutive presidential election without a Southerner on either major party ticket. That has happened in back-to-back elections only once, 1968 and 1972, since Franklin Roosevelt, a New Yorker, won four consecutive elections with overwhelming support across what was then Democrats' solid South. (The 2008 candidates were Democrat Barack Obama of Illinois and Joe Biden of Delaware, and Republican John McCain of Arizona and Sarah Palin of Alaska. This year, it's Obama and Biden, and Republicans Mitt Romney of Massachusetts and Paul Ryan of Wisconsin.)

The issue: U.S. troops are still in Afghanistan, nearly 11 years after they invaded. Why? The answer boils down to one word: al-Qaida. The goal is to damage the terrorist group enough to prevent a repeat of the 9/11 attacks.

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — The latest prisoner to die at the U.S. base in Guantanamo, Cuba, was identified Tuesday as a Yemeni man with a history of mental illness who battled guards inside the prison and challenged his confinement all the way to the Supreme Court. Adnan Latif had spent a more than decade at Guantanamo, where he repeatedly went on hunger strike and once slashed his wrist and hurled the blood at his visiting lawyer. He had also received some mental health treatment at the detainee hospital, according to his lawyers and court records.

VIENNA (AP) — The U.N. atomic agency has received new and significant intelligence over the past month that Iran has moved further toward the ability to build a nuclear weapon, diplomats tell The Associated Press. They say the intelligence shows that Iran has advanced its work on calculating the destructive power of an atomic warhead through a series of computer models that it ran sometime within the past three years.

CAIRO (AP) — Egyptian protesters, largely ultraconservative Islamists, climbed the walls of the U.S. Embassy in Cairo on Tuesday, made their way into the courtyard and brought down the flag, replacing it with a black flag with an Islamic inscription to protest a film attacking Islam's prophet, Muhammad. Hundreds of protesters marched to the embassy in downtown Cairo, gathering outside its walls and chanting against the movie, which was reportedly produced in the United States.

ALEPPO, Syria (AP) — It had been a calm day in Aleppo's Shifa Hospital, said Dr. Osman al-Haj Osman, his face etched with exhaustion from just three hours of sleep. Then, a man burst in bearing the shrieking bundle of a 6-year-old girl who'd had a machine-gun bullet rip through both her knees. Two months into the battle for Syria's largest city, civilians are still bearing the brunt of the daily assaults of helicopter gunships, roaring jets and troops fighting in the streets.

SANAA, Yemen (AP) — A powerful car bomb struck the Yemeni defense minister's motorcade as he was driving through the nation's capital Tuesday, killing at least 13 people but leaving the minister unharmed, security officials said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the blast but al-Qaida's Yemeni branch has carried out several failed assassination attempts against the minister, Maj. Gen. Mohammed Nasser Ahmed, in the past. The attack comes a day after Yemeni authorities announced the death of the No. 2 leader of the network's Yemeni branch in an apparent U.S. airstrike.

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers posted fewer jobs in July than in June, further evidence that hiring may stay weak in the coming months. Job openings fell to a seasonally adjusted 3.67 million, the Labor Department said Tuesday. That down from June's 3.72 million job openings, which was revised lower.

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