Blog Posts by Chris Moody

  • The night of Herman Cain’s “9-9-9 Plan”

    The Republican presidential debate in Hanover, N.H. (AP)

    There was one clear winner from Tuesday's Republican presidential debate, based on the simple metrics of name recognition: businessman Herman Cain's "9-9-9 Plan."

    Virtually all the candidates at the debate table had something to say about Cain's plan to replace the tax code with three, flat nine-percent federal taxes on consumption, business and income. Cain, once delegated to the remote wings of the debate stage, has enjoyed a surge in the polls ever since he won the straw poll in Orlando, Fla., last month, and at the first debate since he joined former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Gov. Rick Perry in the top tier, Cain and his policy proposals took up more of the debate's time than the ideas floated by any other candidate.

    Of course, this isn't to say that any of them praised Cain's idea. Far from it. In fact, everyone who had an opportunity took shots at the plan.

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  • Yahoo News live-blogging GOP presidential debate with ABC News

    Yahoo News will join with ABC News to provide live commentary and analysis of the Republican presidential debate in Hanover, N.H., which begins at 8 p.m. on Tuesday.

    The debate, co-sponsored by The Washington Post and Bloomberg News, will focus on the economy.

    The liveblog of the debate at The Ticket will feature Daniel Gross, the economics editor of Yahoo Finance; Chris Moody, a political reporter for The Ticket; Chris Suellentrop, the deputy editor for blogs at Yahoo News; and Z. Byron Wolf, a deputy political director for ABC News. Rachel Rose Hartman, a political reporter for the Ticket, will join the conversation from the scene of the debate in Hanover.

    Watch the debate live here.

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  • Romney calls on Perry to ‘repudiate’ Texas pastor’s comments about his religion

    Perry and Christie (AP)Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney called on Texas Gov. Rick Perry to repudiate comments made by a pastor who endorsed Perry last week and said that Romney, who is Mormon, was part of a "cult."

    "I just don't think that kind of divisiveness based on religion has a place in this country," Romney said when asked about the comments at a Tuesday press conference with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who endorsed him. "I believe in the spirit of the founders when they crafted this nation. They said we would be a nation that tolerated other people, different faiths that would be a place of religious diversity. . . . I would call on Governor Perry to repudiate the sentiment and the remarks made by that pastor."

    Robert Jeffress, pastor of the First Baptist Church of Dallas, introduced Perry before he spoke at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C. last week and said that Christian voters should not vote for Romney because of his Mormon faith.

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  • Herman Cain nominated for ‘Mustached American of the Year’ Award

    Herman Cain's mustache (AP)

    The American Mustache Institute, after recovering from crushing disappointment after John Bolton's decision not to run for president, has found renewed hope in Herman Cain. The institute is a charity group that calls itself the "world's leading facial hair advocacy organization."

    The institute nominated Cain for its annual "Mustached American of the Year Award," putting the presidential candidate up against Jimmy "The Rent is Too Damn High" McMillan, astronaut Mark Kelly, former NFL player and coach Mike Ditka and others who sport whiskers.

    Cain "represents a shining beacon of light for the Mustached American community, as no Mustached American has sat in the Oval Office since William Howard Taft," Aaron Perlut, the chairman of the American Mustache Institute, told The Ticket in an email. "Even more offensive, no major party-affiliated Mustached American has even run for the presidency since Thomas E. Dewey in 1948, although Bob Barr ran recently on the Libertarian ticket. So

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  • Cain campaign says it’s not planning to change anything despite new top-tier status

    Cain addresses the Values Voters Summit (AP)

    Businessman Herman Cain says that running for president has been the toughest thing he's ever done, but Tuesday's debate could be his greatest hurdle yet in the campaign.

    For the first time this election cycle, Cain is near the top of the polls. A national Gallup survey released Monday night placed Cain in a statistical tie with former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, leapfrogging him over Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Cain was only polling 5 percent support when the survey was taken last month. Now he's nearing 20 percent.

    With his newly minted top tier status, Cain will no longer be delegated to stand near the wings of the stage. At Tuesday night's Washington Post/Bloomberg debate, he'll stand in the center, next to Romney in Perry's old spot. And with his new positioning, he'll receive tougher questions from the debate moderator and more attention from the press after the contest.

    But, as Cain has noticed, that's where the perks end. Now that he's near the top, everything he says (and has said in the past) will be dissected and analyzed.

    At the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C. last Friday, Cain discussed what it was like transitioning from his earlier status a candidate that everyone wrote off as a "me too" to joining the top tier.

    "You get this bull's eye on your back," Cain said. "And people take pot shots left and right."

    Despite the upgrade, Cain's campaign strategists insist they're not planning to do anything different.

    "Mr. Cain's debate strategy is just to be Mr. Cain," Cain spokesman J.D. Gordon told The Ticket. "It's been working out well for him."

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  • ‘Joe the Plumber’ files paperwork for congressional run

    Wurzelbacher (AP)

    Joseph Wurzelbacher, the Ohio man made famous for an exchange with then-presidential candidate Barack Obama outside his house in 2008, has filed paperwork with the Federal Election Commission to run for Congress in Ohio's 9th District.

    Wurzelbacher filed on Friday and now has completed the paperwork for "Joe for Congress 2012," his official campaign committee.

    The Toledo Blade reported in August that several Ohio Republicans were encouraging him to run, and Wurzelbacher said he was open to the idea, but this is the first official step toward announcing his candidacy. When reached by phone, Wurzelbacher said he was "exploring the possibilities," but the documents show that a campaign is in the works.

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  • Team Perry hits Romney hard on health care in web ad

    In a new web ad, Texas Gov. Rick Perry hits main rival Mitt Romney for passing a government health care plan while he was governor of Massachusetts.

    Produced by Lucas Baiano, the consultant who made Tim Pawlenty look like an action hero before Baiano joined Perry's campaign this summer, the ad ties Romney's plan to President Obama's federal health care overhaul. Perry has repeatedly focused on the overlaps between the Romney and Obama plans throughout the campaign.

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  • Not going there: GOP candidates won’t criticize Romney for his faith

    Romney addresses the Values Voters Summit (AP)It was bound to come up on the campaign trail sooner or later, but it appears that among the candidates now vying for the GOP presidential nomination, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney's Mormon faith will not be made an issue this election cycle.

    None of the Republican presidential candidates took an opportunity to criticize Romney for his religion over the weekend, after Texas Gov. Rick Perry accepted a public endorsement from a prominent Texas pastor who said as a Mormon, Romney was a cultist.

    Dr. Robert Jeffress, the pastor of the First Baptist Church of Dallas who introduced Perry at the Values Voters Summit over the weekend, told the crowd they had a choice between Perry, "a committed follower of Christ" or merely a "good" person, insinuating that Romney wasn't a Christian. Speaking to reporters after the event, he called Romney's religion a "cult."

    "I really think the decision for conservative evangelical Christians right now is going to be, do we prefer somebody who is truly a believer in Jesus Christ, or somebody who is a good moral person but he's a part of a cult," Jeffress said.

    Perry's campaign responded quickly, saying that Perry did not endorse Jeffress' view.

    Neither did any of the other candidates--either that, or the candidate declined to state his or her opinion.

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  • Pastor who endorsed Perry on Friday says Romney is a cultist

    Dr. Robert Jeffress, the influential pastor of a Dallas-based megachurch, offered his formal endorsement of Texas Gov. Rick Perry Friday at the Values Voter Summit in Washington, D.C. Friday, shortly before he explained why Perry's opponent atop the GOP field, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, is a cultist.

    Jeffress introduced Perry before he addressed the annual gathering for social conservatives, making a special point to emphasize Perry's Christian faith--as opposed to Romney's, who a Mormon, which Jeffress said was a "cult."

    "We understand Mormonism is not Christianity and thus the difference between somebody who's moral and good like Mitt Romney and a true born-again follower of Christ," Jeffress said after Perry's speech, adding that Perry had welcomed his endorsement. "I really think the decision for conservative evangelical Christians right now is going to be, do we prefer somebody who is truly a believer in Jesus Christ, or somebody who is a good moral person but he's a part of a cult."

    "It's not politically correct to say, but it's true. Mormonism is a cult. And for those reasons, besides Governor Romney's lack of consistency on social issues, I think Rick Perry is the most electable choice among Christian conservatives," he went on.

    Jeffress' views, however, do not reflect Perry's, his campaign spokesman told The Ticket.

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  • Santorum: When seeking a candidate, ‘look at who they lay down with at night’

    Santorum with wife, Karen, in 2006. (AP)

    Speaking at the Values Voters Summit in Washington, D.C. Friday, Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum emphasized the importance of family in choosing a nominee.

    "When you look at someone to determine whether they'd be the right person for public office, look at who they lay down with at night and what they believe," Santorum, a former senator from Pennsylvania, said.

    Santorum brought his wife, Karen Garver Santorum, and four of their seven children on stage after his speech.

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