Blog Posts by Chris Moody

  • Why Ted Cruz will spend the rest of the day speaking on the Senate floor about Obamacare

    In a Capitol Hill hallway leading to the Senate floor on Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid had just finished telling reporters that no Republican would delay a vote to fund the government. But then Texas GOP Sen. Ted Cruz, carrying a stack of papers under his arm, strolled past him toward the door of the chamber.

    Cruz turned his head toward the gaggle of reporters around Reid and walked through the doors onto the floor, where he stopped at his desk on the far-right corner of the room.

    “I intend to speak about defunding Obamacare until I am unable to stand,” he declared.

    With his colleague Utah Sen. Mike Lee on his left and an aide on his right, Cruz began what is expected to be an hourslong speech that could last late into the night about the importance of gutting the federal health care law that President Barack Obama signed in 2010.

    Cruz’s move has all the looks of an old-fashioned filibuster, but it’s technically just a very long speech that will draw attention and focus to

    Read More »from Why Ted Cruz will spend the rest of the day speaking on the Senate floor about Obamacare
  • Top Senate Republican leaders do not support effort to filibuster spending bill

    The Senate's two top Republican leaders on Monday put the kibosh on a call from some of their own members to defund Obamacare with a filibuster of a crucial operations budget.

    Their move is in line with the increasing GOP consensus that shutting down the federal government to hobble the president's health care law is not a winning strategy for the party.

    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Senate Minority Whip John Cornyn of Texas both announced that they would vote to override a Republican filibuster of the Continuing Resolution (CR) that the House passed on Friday. That measure would fund the government through Dec. 15 but does not include funding for the 2010 American re.

    “Sen. McConnell supports the House Republicans’ bill and will not vote to block it, since it defunds Obamacare and funds the government without increasing spending by a penny. He will also vote against any amendment that attempts to add Obamacare funding back into the House Republicans’ bill,”

    Read More »from Top Senate Republican leaders do not support effort to filibuster spending bill
  • Ted Cruz: ‘Embarrassed’ to have supported McCain for president in 2008

    Ted Cruz had barely been in the Senate for two months in March when Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain famously voiced his frustration with the new Texas lawmaker by calling him a “wacko bird.”

    The two seem to have never quite gotten along, even though McCain apologized soon after he made the comment. But Cruz, who this week is finding himself at the receiving end of Republican vitriol for his plan to risk a government shutdown in order to defund the 2010 federal health care law, doesn’t think much of McCain either.

    In a new lengthy GQ profile, Cruz told the magazine that conservatives were “embarrassed” to vote in 2008 — the year that McCain was the Republican presidential nominee.

    “I don’t know a conservative who didn’t feel embarrassed voting in 2006 or 2008,” Cruz told GQ. “I think the Republican Party lost its way. We didn’t stand for the principles we’re supposed to believe in.”

    The profile of Cruz, a politician who has ignited speculation about whether he himself may run for

    Read More »from Ted Cruz: ‘Embarrassed’ to have supported McCain for president in 2008
  • House sends government spending bill to the Senate without Obamacare funding

    The House on Friday approved a bill to temporarily fund the government that would strip funding for the 2010 federal health care law known as Obamacare, a move that will set up a showdown with the Senate next week that could result in a government shutdown.

    The bill, which Democrats in the Senate plan to reject in its current form, would set spending levels at $986.3 billion through Dec. 15. Congress must pass a bill to set federal funding levels, known as a continuing resolution (CR) by Oct. 1, or the government will partially close. House Republicans see the mandatory deadline as a final opportunity to cripple the 3-year-old health care law.

    The bill passed largely along party lines. Only two Democrats, Reps. Jim Matheson of Utah and Mike McIntyre of North Carolina, voted for the CR.

    While conservatives in the House see the passage of the bill as a victory, the celebration will be short-lived. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid intends to strip out the part of the bill that defunds the

    Read More »from House sends government spending bill to the Senate without Obamacare funding
  • Did GOP Sen. Mike Lee accidentally make the Democrats' point about Obamacare and shutdowns?

    He probably didn’t mean for it to come out this way, but Utah Republican Sen. Mike Lee, a leader of an effort in Congress to use mandatory spending bills to defund Obamacare, may have handed over messaging ammunition to Democrats.

    Surrounded by Republican House and Senate lawmakers at a Capitol Hill press conference Thursday, Lee and his colleagues called on Democrats to pass a bill that would fund the government but also defund the health care law. The federal government will temporarily shut down on Oct. 1 if Congress does not pass a bill extending funding.

    While arguing that Democrats should accept the Republican path forward on Obamacare, however, Lee said that the law “is not worth causing a shutdown over.”

    "A shutdown is too much. We don’t want a shutdown, we don’t need a shutdown. We should avoid a shutdown, and Obamacare is a law that’s going to harm people. It certainly is not a good idea to shut down the government in order to force through the implementation of Obamacare at

    Read More »from Did GOP Sen. Mike Lee accidentally make the Democrats' point about Obamacare and shutdowns?
  • Creepy Obamacare ad hits college campuses and your nightmares

    Screenshot from an ad campaign that will urge young people not to sign up for insurance exchanges established under the federal health care law. (YouTube.com)


    There will be girls. There will be beer. There will be cornhole. And someone will be dressed in the creepiest Uncle Sam costume you’ve ever seen.

    Welcome to the strange new front in the war over Obamacare.

    As the Republican dream of repealing President Barack Obama’s health care law in Congress crumbles, the fight over the law’s future shifts from Washington to college campuses, where the new challenge for Obamacare proponents lies in convincing young people to sign up for coverage mandated by the law.

    The period to enroll in health insurance exchanges established under the 2010 law begins Oct. 1, which will mark the start of a race to urge Americans to participate. The health exchanges rely heavily on young, healthy Americans who will subsidize the sick and elderly within the pools. Without the healthy, the exchanges could be unsustainable. The Obama administration is devoting millions of public dollars to promote the exchanges, but many conservative groups are actively working to

    Read More »from Creepy Obamacare ad hits college campuses and your nightmares
  • U.S. lawmakers unite in fury over Putin's op-ed in New York Times

    It’s not every day that an opinion piece in The New York Times simultaneously insults the Republican speaker of the House and nearly causes the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to  "vomit."

    But that’s exactly what happened when Russian President Vladimir Putin penned an article calling for the U.S. government, which is considering launching a military strike on Syria for alleged war crimes, to use restraint in the Middle East. In his piece, Putin also took issue with part of President Barack Obama's national address on Syria on Tuesday night, which made the case for military action and praised “American exceptionalism.”

    “It is extremely dangerous to encourage people to see themselves as exceptional, whatever the motivation,” Putin wrote.

    “I was at dinner,” New Jersey Democratic Sen. Bob Menendez said on CNN after he read the piece. “And I almost wanted to vomit.”

    Other lawmakers were equally blunt.

    “I was insulted,” House Speaker John Boehner told reporters on

    Read More »from U.S. lawmakers unite in fury over Putin's op-ed in New York Times
  • Senate formally puts Syria resolution vote on hold

    Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid on Wednesday removed from immediate consideration a proposed resolution authorizing military force against Syria in response to a request from President Barack Obama.

    The move will provide U.S. officials time to negotiate a diplomatic solution with the war-torn nation.

    “We’ve agreed on a way forward based on the president's speech last night,” Reid, a Nevada Democrat, said on the Senate floor. “The president has asked Congress to postpone a vote to authorize the use of force in Syria and pursue a diplomatic solution to see if that works.”

    Just days after Obama called on lawmakers to support a resolution approving a “limited” strike on the Syrian government over the alleged use of chemical weapons, the president visited Capitol Hill on Tuesday and urged them to delay a vote. He cited the possibility of a pending deal with the Russian government that would require Syria to turn over its chemical arsenal and join a pact against using such weapons in the

    Read More »from Senate formally puts Syria resolution vote on hold
  • Paul Ryan a firm ‘no’ on military strike against Syria

    Rep. Paul Ryan, the Wisconsin Republican and former vice presidential candidate, broke his silence Wednesday about a possible U.S. strike against Syria, calling President Barack Obama’s military threat an “ill-conceived, half-hearted proposal.”

    "I believe the president's proposed military strike in Syria cannot achieve its stated objectives. In fact, I fear it will make things worse,” Ryan said in a statement. “The president says a show of force will preserve our credibility. But a feckless show of force will only damage our credibility.”

    Ryan’s comments came a day after Obama asked members of Congress to delay a vote on a resolution that would authorize a strike. The delay, Obama said, would provide time to pursue a diplomatic solution in cooperation with the Russian government that would force Syria to turn over its arsenal of chemical weapons to international authorities. Obama also told lawmakers that the threat of a U.S. strike needed to remain on the table throughout the

    Read More »from Paul Ryan a firm ‘no’ on military strike against Syria
  • Obama’s message to Congress on Syria: Give it time and don’t undermine the process

    President Barack Obama traveled to Capitol Hill on Tuesday where he urged senators to provide time for diplomatic discussions regarding Syria's chemical weapons stockpiles by delaying a vote on a resolution authorizing military force, lawmakers said after the meeting.

    According to senators who met with Obama — he spoke first to Senate Democrats and then Senate Republicans during private luncheons — the president believes it is necessary to keep the possibility of a U.S. military strike on the table in order to convince the Syrian government to give up its chemical weapons. But he said more time is needed for talks between U.S. officials and the Russian government about an alternative diplomatic solution.

    In other words, as Oklahoma Republican Sen. James Inhofe paraphrased Obama’s message: “Hang loose. Give me a chance.”

    “The president clearly believes that the threat of force is what is moving the crisis along and has produced this new proposal by the Russians,” said Maine Republican

    Read More »from Obama’s message to Congress on Syria: Give it time and don’t undermine the process

Pagination

(1,514 Stories)