Blog Posts by Chris Moody

  • Boehner slaps down Graham: ‘He’s dead wrong’ about Olympics boycott over Snowden

    South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham was “dead wrong” when he suggested the United States should boycott the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia if the country continues to harbor Edward Snowden, House Speaker John Boehner said on Wednesday.

    Boehner, R-Ohio, rejected the notion during a press conference when asked about Graham’s recent comments to a newspaper in which he suggested a boycott. 

    “Listen, I love Sen. Graham. We’ve been close friends for 20 years. But I think he’s dead wrong,” Boehner said during a press conference on Capitol Hill. “Why would we want to punish U.S. athletes who have been training for three years to compete in the Olympics over a traitor who can’t find a place to call home?”

    In an interview with The Hill earlier this week, Graham said boycotting the Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, would “send the Russians the most unequivocal signal” if the nation grants asylum to Snowden, the former government contractor who in May leaked sensitive information about

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  • Bush brothers team up to make donors out of young Republicans

    In a time when so many Republican groups are searching for ways to persuade young Americans to support them in the ballot booth, the sons of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush have taken up perhaps a more difficult task: Making donors out of them.

    The Bush boys, 37-year-old George P. Bush and Jeb Bush Jr., 29—nephews and grandchildren of American presidents—are working to encourage right-leaning millennials and Gen Xers to start giving to Republican campaigns and causes through Maverick PAC, a group George P. co-founded in 2004. Jeb Jr. serves as a state co-chair of the organization and runs his own political action committee out of Florida, SunPAC, which promotes Hispanic Republican candidates.

    Last weekend, MavPAC held its annual members-only conference for the first time in Miami, Fla., where young GOP donors gathered at the Mandarin Oriental hotel to hear keynote addresses from Republican leaders such as Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio, Jeb Bush and New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez.

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  • Conservatives who oppose immigration bill see issue as opportunity to connect with black Democrats

    Demonstrators at the "DC March for Jobs" on July 15, 2013. (Chris Moody/Yahoo News)

    WASHINGTON – By the time Iowa Republican Rep. Steve King reached the top of Capitol Hill after leading a mile-long walk across Washington, his blue oxford shirt was drenched in sweat.

    “I may be the only one here today that is actually happy that it’s going to be 100 degrees in Washington, D.C.,” King told a crowd of several hundred gathered near the U.S Capitol Monday to protest federal immigration reform.

    “No you’re not!” a man in the audience yelled back. “I like it hot!”

    “It’s the sweat of American workers that have built this country,” King went on. “So I think it’s all together fitting and proper that we should sweat here today as we stand up for the American workers.”

    A half-hour before, King had kicked off the demonstration across town at Freedom Plaza — the same patch of concrete where a faction of Occupy Wall Street had pitched tents nearly two years before — to protest efforts to overhaul the nation’s immigration laws.

    After railing against the immigration bill in his brief

    Read More »from Conservatives who oppose immigration bill see issue as opportunity to connect with black Democrats
  • The Michele Bachmann guide to spanking the president

    Outgoing Minnesota Republican Rep. Michele Bachmann thinks President Barack Obama deserves what she called a "spanking," and she knows just how Congress ought to give it to him.

    “He has a perpetual magic wand, and nobody’s given him a spanking yet and taken it out of his hand,” Bachmann told WND.com in an interview that focused on opposing the latest effort to overhaul the nation's immigration system. "That's what Congress needs to do. Give the president a major wake-up call. And the way we spank the president is we do it through the checkbook. We're the ones who say, no, you can't have the money."

    Bachmann, who ran unsuccessfully for president in 2012 and announced in May that she would not seek re-election to the House, argued that Congress should be more forceful in wielding its constitutional power of the purse to push back against the president.

    "What's wrong with us?" Bachmann added. "What is wrong with us that we would give the president 10 cents to fund Obamacare?”

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  • Furloughed federal employees lash out--and find solidarity--online

    Federal employees around the country are facing obligatory work furloughs as a result of budget sequestration, which mandates across-the-board cuts in government spending.

    The government belt-tightening is having real-world consequences for thousands of federal workers, contractors and those who rely on federal assistance programs. Over the past few weeks, many federal employees received furlough slips notifying them of immediate work and salary reductions.

    Unsurprisingly, few are thrilled about losing 20 percent of their pay, and some are speaking out. They've banded together on the public Facebook group "How I Spent My Furlough Day," using it as a space to vent through personal stories, pictures and videos about how they're coping with the cuts.

    Here are some of the best posts on the Facebook group:



    *This is not the Al Cardenas of the American Conservative Union.


    You could write an entire cookbook about furlough food. Most of it would be booze and ramen.








    Personal grooming is no

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  • Boehner: 'Vast majority' of House GOP wants to act on immigration; Pelosi points to support from 'Bible folks'

    After months of being told to hurry up on immigration, it's time to wait.

    House Republicans said they plan to act, but not in haste, after huddling in a closed-door meeting to discuss how to proceed on an immigration bill.

    While the chamber intends to proceed on immigration, Speaker John Boehner reiterated on Thursday that the House would not take up the Senate immigration bill that passed last month with bipartisan support. Several House Republicans offered their perspectives on the issue during their meeting, Boehner said, concluding that “a vast majority” of the conference wants to see a bill passed that addresses border enforcement and the approximately 11 million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally.

    “It’s clear from the conversation we had yesterday that the members do believe—a vast majority of our members do believe—that we have to wrestle with this problem,” Boehner told reporters Thursday. “They also believe that we need to do this step-by-step common sense approach.”

    Time,

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  • Liberal, conservative groups push for immigration bill in the House

    Facing pressure from interest groups to pass an immigration reform bill, House Republicans planned to meet Wednesday in a closed-door meeting to hash out a way forward on the issue.

    Outside, a rare coalition with groups from across the political spectrum are looking for ways to convince them to act. The heads of the conservative American Action Forum, Americans of Tax Reform and the American Conservative Union sent a joint letter to congressional leaders this week calling for passage of a comprehensive bill. Labor groups are dispatching members to congressional offices and running ads in a dozen House districts. The Evangelical Immigration Table, a coalition of Christian groups are holding a gathering in Washington D.C. later this month.

    The Senate passed its own immigration bill with bipartisan support in June, and as attention shifts to the House, immigration reform advocates are re-calibrating their outreach efforts for the lower chamber, where the hurdles to passing a comprehensive

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  • House Leader Cantor on Supreme Court decisions, future of immigration reform

    In a wide-ranging interview with Yahoo News, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor discussed the next steps Congress could take in the aftermath of this week's Supreme Court decisions on voting rights and same-sex marriage, the future of immigration reform, President Barack Obama's response to National Security Agency document leaker Edward Snowden and his own plan to change the perception of the Republican Party.

    Cantor addressed this week's Supreme Court ruling that struck down a key part of the Voting Rights Act, a decision that left Congress with the task of passing an new version of the law. Cantor said he planned to discuss options with Georgia Democratic Rep. John Lewis, a civil rights leader with whom Cantor traveled recently on a pilgrimage to the movement's landmarks in Alabama.

    "I look forward to having some discussions," Cantor said. "I intend to talk to John Lewis about his thoughts on this matter. I think that you could probably say for both sides of the political aisle--no

    Read More »from House Leader Cantor on Supreme Court decisions, future of immigration reform
  • Cantor on immigration vote: ‘I can’t tell you what’s in that big Senate bill’

    A bill that would overhaul the nation's immigration system passed with bipartisan support in the Senate Thursday, but some of the top Republican leaders in the House say they haven’t bothered to find out what’s in it.

    In an exclusive interview with Yahoo News Thursday evening, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor said he’s not aware of the details in the Senate version of the immigration bill and reiterated that the House would move ahead with its own approach.

    “I can’t tell you what’s in that big Senate bill, and the well over 1,000 or 1,500 pages that it may be, and that’s my concern,” Cantor told Yahoo News. “I don’t know if you could ask a lot of the senators what’s in that bill. And that’s my concern.”

    The Senate bill is comprehensive, combining mandates for border security and a pathway to legal status for immigrants living in the United States unlawfully. House Republican leaders have signaled that they will take a piecemeal approach to immigration reform instead, a move that could

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  • Senate immigration bill is a ‘pipe dream’ in the House: GOP lawmaker

    Illinois Republican Rep. Peter Roskam (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

    The Senate is poised to pass a comprehensive immigration bill this week. Immigration reform proponents will cheer! Immigrant activists will cry tears of joy! DREAMers will dream bigger dreams!

    Not to be a heartbreaker, but this party probably won't last long.

    The Republican-controlled House of Representatives hasn't the slightest intention of passing the thing as a whole, says Illinois Republican Rep. Peter Roskam, a lawmaker responsible for counting Republican votes.

    Roskam, who serves as the Republican chief deputy whip, made it clear on Thursday that House leaders do not plan to put the complete Senate bill to a vote on the floor of the lower chamber. Even if they did, it likely wouldn't pass.

    “The House has no capacity to move that bill in its entirety. It just won’t happen," Roskam said during a meeting with reporters on Thursday morning. "It is a pipe dream to think that that bill is going to go to the floor and be voted on. The House is going to move through in a more deliberative

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