Blog Posts by Holly Bailey, Yahoo News

  • Anthony Weiner, flanked by wife, apologizes for sending more lewd messages after resignation

    NEW YORK — Anthony Weiner confirmed Tuesday that he was behind a series of newly released explicit messages sent to a woman who was not his wife more than a year after a sexting scandal forced him out of Congress in 2011.

    Flanked by his wife, longtime Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin, Weiner acknowledged in a press conference Tuesday evening that he continued to send the messages even after he had resigned from Congress,. He said the issue was now "behind" him and that he was no longer in touch with any online paramours.

    The generally press-shy Abedin surprised the room by reading a brief statement of support for her husband after Weiner's prepared comments. "Anthony has made some horrible mistakes, both before he resigned from Congress and after," Abedin said, appearing emotional. "But I do strongly believe that that's between us." Abedin added that she's forgiven him after much therapy and wants to move forward. "Our marriage, like many others, has had its ups and its downs."

    The

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  • Officer who released Marathon bombing suspect photos relieved of duty; legal impact of photos' release unclear

    A Massachusetts State Police sergeant was relieved of duty on Thursday after he gave graphic photos documenting the surrender of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to Boston Magazine. And the release of the photos could have an impact on the case.

    Sgt. Sean Murphy, a tactical photographer for the state police, documented the capture of a bloodied Tsarnaev as he emerged from a boat parked in the backyard of a home in Watertown, Mass., on April 19—four days after the deadly bombings, which killed three and injured more than 260.

    Murphy released 14 photos he took during the manhunt to Boston Magazine after being angered by the cover image of Tsarnaev on Rolling Stone magazine, which some have said depicts the bombing suspect in a softer light. The photo, which was taken from one of Tsarnaev’s social media accounts, has also been published in The New York Times and other media outlets.

    Murphy told the magazine his photos, which show Tsarnaev bloodied and with the laser of a

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  • Christine Quinn launches first ad in NYC mayoral race

    NEW YORK — Mayoral hopeful Christine Quinn unveiled her first television ad Thursday, arguing that she’s the candidate in the best position to help the middle class and that her record proves it.

    The 30-second spot, which will air on the city’s four network affiliates and on cable TV, is the first major television campaign by one of the Democratic mayoral candidates ahead of the September primary. (Supermarket mogul John Catsimatidis, who is seeking the Republican nomination, has been running ads for months.)

    “Middle class and working families are the heart of New York, and they’re who I fight for every day,” Quinn, who is speaker of the City Council, says in the spot. “While others talk about fighting for the middle class, I’ve been doing it.”

    Quinn cites, among other things, her efforts on the council to pass a living wage law, create affordable housing and pass balanced budgets without increasing taxes.

    The ad comes just hours after a new New York Times/Siena College poll found

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  • Bloomberg's latest anti-obesity effort encourages New Yorkers to take the stairs

    NEW YORK—Mayor Michael Bloomberg has gone after supersized sodas and transfats in his quest to curb obesity in New York. Now, in his final months in office, he’s targeting elevators.

    On Wednesday, Bloomberg unveiled a new initiative that would encourage office workers to take the stairs instead of the elevator and promote the idea of “active design” in new and renovated buildings in the city, including open stairwells and floor plans that would force people to walk more during the day.

    “Exercise is good for you,” Bloomberg declared at a press conference announcing the new design initiative.

    The plan includes the creation of the Center for Active Design, a nonprofit group partly funded by the city that would suggest design changes in New York buildings and around the world to promote more physical activity.

    For existing buildings, the mayor said he would also introduce legislation that would relax city codes that usually require doors leading to stairwells to be closed or locked in case

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  • Anthony Weiner benefits from wife's ties to the Clintons

    Bill and Hillary Clinton have said they won’t endorse a candidate in New York City’s mayoral election this year. But several members of their fundraising network have contributed to former Rep. Anthony Weiner’s bid for City Hall—apparently at the request of his wife, longtime Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin.

    The Wall Street Journal reports that much of the $800,000 Weiner raised in the past two months came from donors who have also given big money to the Clintons. Just under $150,000 were donations directly solicited by Abedin, who was listed as a bundler in Weiner’s campaign finance report filed on Monday.

    Some of that money appears to have been raised at a “Women for Anthony” event Abedin hosted last month in Manhattan.

    The event’s host committee was packed with longtime supporters of the Clintons, including Cheryl Saban, wife of entertainment mogul and Democratic megadonor Haim Saban; Boston philanthropist Elaine Schuster; and Ann Tenenbaum, a longtime Clinton donor who has

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  • NYC's 911 response time under scrutiny after emergency at Christine Quinn event

    BROOKLYN, N.Y. — Mayoral hopeful Christine Quinn came to Williamsburg on Tuesday to hold a news conference about the debate over where New York City stores its trash. But the event turned into a real-life examination of the city’s 911 response times when a young woman fainted and an ambulance didn’t show up for more than a half hour.

    The woman, an 18-year-old City Council intern who turned out for Quinn’s outdoor press conference, passed out and hit her head on the sidewalk just after 11:45 a.m. — about 30 minutes into Quinn’s event.

    Quinn, who is speaker of the City Council, rushed to her side while her staff and reporters on the scene called 911. For several minutes, the woman drifted in and out of consciousness, telling Quinn and others attending to her that she wasn’t sure where she was. Officials blamed the intense heat. At the time of the accident, it was already 93 degrees.

    After several minutes, a member of Quinn’s security detail, who is also an EMT, grabbed his emergency

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  • Weiner, Spitzer lead in NYC polls

    Driven from office by separate scandals, Anthony Weiner and Eliot Spitzer might get a second chance from New York City voters this fall, a new poll suggests.

    A Quinnipiac University poll released Monday found that Weiner, a former congressman now running to succeed Mayor Michael Bloomberg, narrowly leads his closest rival, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, 25 percent to 22 percent in a crowded Democratic primary.

    Meanwhile, Spitzer, the former governor who launched a surprise, last-minute bid for city comptroller last week, leads his rival, Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer, 48 percent to 33 percent.

    The poll comes roughly two months before the city's Sept. 10 Democratic primary, in which both men are trying to live down scandals that forced them out of office.

    Spitzer was forced out of the governor’s office in 2008 when he was caught cheating on his wife with prostitutes. As attorney general, Spitzer had cracked down on the kind of prostitution rings he later was found

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  • Seven people reportedly killed in train crash near Paris

    At least seven people reportedly have been killed and dozens injured in a train derailment outside Paris.

    A spokesman for the SNCF, the country’s national rail company, told Reuters the train was transporting passengers from Paris to Limoges when it derailed near Bretigny-sur-Orge, about 20 miles south of Paris during the height of Friday’s rush hour.

    The train was reportedly carrying 350 passengers, and there were reports that it split in two as it was coming into the station. French transportation officials had reportedly declared a “code red”—meaning an accident in which “many people are victims.”

    France 24, citing local media reports, said that passengers remained trapped on the train and that some victims had been electrocuted and crushed. There were conflicting reports as to exactly how many people had been killed.

    “The death toll is evolving constantly at this point and unfortunately it will probably rise,” French Interior Minister Manuel Valls told Reuters. “At this stage there

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  • Finding Chris Hondros: Film to explore life of slain war photographer through images

    Chris Hondros and Joseph Duo were the unlikeliest of friends. One was a veteran war photographer for Getty Images based in New York, the other a Liberian soldier who had dropped out of school in the 10th grade to go to war. Their lives couldn’t have been more different, save for a fleeting moment in July 2003 when an iconic image tied them together forever.

    It was a photograph Hondros took of Duo, a commander of a militia backing then-Liberian President Charles Taylor, as he leapt in the air with rapturous joy moments after firing off a rocket-propelled grenade at rebel forces during the country’s deadly civil war.

    The image of Duo frozen in midair, drunk in the glory of war, became not only an iconic reminder of the deadly conflict in Liberia but one of the most important images in modern war photography and a finalist for the 2004 Pulitzer Prize. It was one of the most famous photographs taken by Hondros, whose celebrated career was cut short when he was killed in an April 2011

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  • Eliot Spitzer submits 27,000 signatures to qualify for NYC ballot

    NEW YORK—Eliot Spitzer says he gathered more than 27,000 signatures to make it on the ballot in the race for New York City comptroller—describing it as an “outpouring show of support” for his bid to return to politics.

    The signatures, which still have to be verified by the city Board of Elections, are more than seven times the 3,750 Spitzer needed to qualify for the Sept. 10 Democratic primary.

    Spitzer presented four boxes of petitions to the Board of Elections office shortly after 10:30 p.m.—about 90 minutes before the signatures were formally due but just in time for the local 11 p.m. newscasts. As he arrived, Spitzer was swarmed by reporters and a crowd of onlookers—some of whom cheered the ex-lawmaker.

    “I want to thank the citizens of New York who have signed these petitions. … It is an important statement to those who said it was not possible in the course of three and a half days to gather enough signatures to get a candidate on the ballot for citywide office,” Spitzer declared.

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