Blog Posts by Holly Bailey

  • Live updates: Trial of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

    Jurors hear gruesome testimony on fatal shooting of MIT officer Sean Collier

    The trial of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev continues Thursday. Testimony focused on the murder of MIT police officer Sean Collier, who was shot and killed at close range as the Tsarnaev brothers allegedly tried to steal his gun hours after their pictures were broadcast as suspects in the marathon bombings. Collier was shot six times, including three times in the head.

    Some jurors gasped and teared up as they viewed gruesome autopsy photos of the gunshot wounds to Collier's head. The head wounds caused "direct destruction of the brain," Renee Robinson, the Boston medical examiner who performed the autopsy, testified. "His heart stopped... He inhaled his own blood."

    That was followed by dramatic new video footage from a Shell gas station in Cambridge, where the Tsarnaev brothers allegedly drove after carjacking a Boston man following Collier's murder. The surveillance video shows Dzhokhar Tsarnaev casually shopping for snacks, including a bag of Doritos and cans of

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  • In Boston Marathon bombing courtroom, gruesome testimony and dread at what is to come

    Videos of the 2013 attacks are hard to watch for some

    CLICK IIMAGE for slideshow: It this courtroom sketch, U.S. Attorney William Weinreb, left, is depicted delivering opening statements in front of U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right rear, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev, depicted seated second from right between defense attorneys Judy Clarke, third from right, and Miriam Conrad, right, is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)CLICK IIMAGE for slideshow: It this courtroom sketch, U.S. Attorney William Weinreb, left, is depicted delivering opening statements in front of U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right rear, on the first day of the federal death penalty trial of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Wednesday, March 4, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev, depicted seated second from right between defense attorneys Judy Clarke, third from right, and Miriam Conrad, right, is charged with conspiring with his brother to place two bombs near the marathon finish line in April 2013, killing three and injuring 260 people. (AP Photo/Jane Flavell Collins)BOSTON—The clock on the video said 2:49 p.m., and it was hard to imagine that anyone in the courtroom didn’t know what was coming up next. In the nearly two years since two bombs exploded near the finish line of the April 2013 Boston Marathon, footage of the two fireballs erupting along Boylston Street, one after the other, has been replayed millions of times, accompanied by gruesome photos and video of the bloody aftermath.

    But as prosecutors began presenting their case against accused bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev on Wednesday with silent footage of those deadly bombs that killed three people and injured nearly 300 more, there was an edge in the air among the jurors, victims and others inside the Boston federal courtroom where the trial is taking place.

    On the screen, dozens of runners could be seen dashing toward the finish line, not knowing that two pressure-cooker bombs filled with nails and ball bearings would soon turn that sunny Monday afternoon into a day of infamy. But the people

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  • Opening statements get underway in Boston Marathon bomber trial

    After two years of legal wrangling, an all-white jury will decide Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s fate

    BOSTON — One is a self-employed housepainter. Another works for a local water department. There’s a mother of four who has twin boys in the eighth grade; a registered nurse who bought an RV to travel cross-country with her boyfriend this spring; and a retired actuary whose cousin was killed at the World Trade Center on 9/11 but who insists she can remain impartial in the most high-profile terrorism case on U.S. soil since those deadly 2001 attacks.

    They are among the 18 people — 12 jurors and six alternates — who will decide if Dzhokhar Tsarnaev lives or dies for his alleged role in the dual bombings at the April 2013 Boston Marathon, which killed three people and injured nearly 300 more. After almost two months of jury selection, opening arguments in the case are set to begin Wednesday, in spite of continued efforts by Tsarnaev’s defense team to move the trial out of Boston.

    On Monday, the defense filed their fourth change-of-venue request with the federal district court, arguing that

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  • In Boston Marathon bombing case, jury selection is an ongoing struggle

    Large majorities of prospective jurors either believe Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is guilty or oppose the death penalty

    In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, third from right, is depicted with his lawyers and U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. His trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 26. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (Jane Flavell Collins/AP Photo)In this courtroom sketch, Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, third from right, is depicted with his lawyers and U.S. District Judge George O'Toole Jr., right, as O'Toole addresses a pool of potential jurors in a jury assembly room at the federal courthouse, Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, in Boston. Tsarnaev is charged with the April 2013 attack that killed three people and injured more than 260. His trial is scheduled to begin on Jan. 26. He could face the death penalty if convicted. (Jane Flavell Collins/AP Photo)
    BOSTON — When she received the summons in December, her friends told her she would be disqualified instantly, and she agreed. There was no way she would make it past the first round of jury selection in the trial of accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Yet there she was on Thursday, potential juror 337, in Courtroom 9 at the federal courthouse, sounding almost mystified at times as she explained why she shouldn’t be one of the 12 Boston-area residents impaneled to determine Tsarnaev’s fate.

    The disqualifications seemed obvious. Her late father, she explained, had spent more than two decades serving on the board of the Boston Athletic Association, the group that sponsors the marathon, and her brothers were still involved in the organization. One had been near the marathon’s finish line in April 2013 only minutes before two bombs were detonated, killing three and injuring nearly 300. The marathon was in her blood, and what happened that day had affected her deeply. There was

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  • Tsarnaev attorneys renew bid to move Boston Marathon bombing trial

    Lawyers say 68 percent of potential jurors already believe Tsarnaev is guilty. ‘String him up,’ says one.

    A courtroom sketch shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (R) during the jury selection process in his trial at the federal courthouse in Boston, Mass., on Jan.15, 2015. Tsarnaev, who appeared in court on Thursday wearing a sports jacket and collared shirt, more formally dressed than in last week's appearances, and with trimmed hair, is also charged with fatally shooting a university police officer three days after the bombing. He has pleaded not guilty. REUTERS/Jane Flavell Collins (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)A courtroom sketch shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (R) during the jury selection process in his trial at the federal courthouse in Boston, Mass., on Jan.15, 2015. Tsarnaev, who appeared in court on Thursday wearing a sports jacket and collared shirt, more formally dressed than in last week's appearances, and with trimmed hair, is also charged with fatally shooting a university police officer three days after the bombing. He has pleaded not guilty. REUTERS/Jane Flavell Collins (UNITED STATES - Tags: CRIME LAW)
    Lawyers for accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev made their third push to move the trial out of Massachusetts Thursday, citing data from court questionnaires that shows 68 percent of the 1,337 Boston-area residents called as prospective jurors in the case already believe their client is guilty.

    In a court filing Thursday, Tsarnaev’s attorneys said roughly the same amount of potential jurors — 69 percent — have a “self-identified connection” to the April 2013 bombings, meaning they were personally affected or knew someone who was. “Stronger support for a finding of presumed prejudice in Boston is difficult to imagine,” Timothy Watkins, one of Tsarnaev’s attorneys wrote in the filing. “The existing record precludes a fair trial in Boston.”

    Based on an analysis of juror questionnaires, the defense noted that just 345 prospective jurors — or 25 percent of those summoned in the case — said they were “unsure” when asked if they had “formed an opinion” that Tsarnaev is guilty,

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  • ‘Gentle Judy’s’ biggest challenge: Defending the accused Boston Marathon bomber

    Judy Clarke has saved a rogues’ gallery from death row. Can she do the same for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev?

    Judy Clarke, the lawyer representing shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner, walks out of a federal court building Wednesday, June 29, 2011, in San Diego, Calif.  (Gregory Bull/AP Photo)Judy Clarke, the lawyer representing shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner, walks out of a federal court building Wednesday, June 29, 2011, in San Diego, Calif.  (Gregory Bull/AP Photo)
    BOSTON — They craned their necks and stared as he made his way into the room. His picture had been all over the media, even on the cover of Rolling Stone, but for 200 prospective jurors gathered in a large assembly room at the federal courthouse earlier this month, it was the first time they’d seen him in the flesh: Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the accused Boston Marathon bomber.

    Taking a seat between his attorneys at a table in the front, the 21-year-old suspect, dressed in khakis and a dark sweater, fidgeted under the microscopic gaze of the potential jury pool before him. They were fixated on the young man widely portrayed as a heartless terrorist who killed with no remorse. Drumming his fingers on his chair, his face aimed toward the ground, Tsarnaev avoided looking at anyone — save for the woman to his left, his attorney Judy Clarke, who suddenly caught his eye and gave him a gentle smile.

    Tsarnaev visibly relaxed, returning her smile with a brief one of his own. And for the first time

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  • Jury selection begins in trial of accused Boston bomber Tsarnaev

    Nearly two years after the attacks, Boston braces for a potentially 'gruesome' trial

    Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is shown in a courtroom sketch during a pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Boston, Massachusetts December 18, 2014. (REUTERS/Jane Collins)Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is shown in a courtroom sketch during a pre-trial hearing at the federal courthouse in Boston, Massachusetts December 18, 2014. (REUTERS/Jane Collins)
    BOSTON—The sidewalk, once charred and stained with blood, was long ago replaced with fresh concrete. The blasted-out storefronts have been rebuilt. Along Boylston Street, one of the busiest shopping stretches in town, the only physical reminder of the two bombs detonated here during the April 2013 Boston Marathon is a small, wooden sign leaning against a tree near the site of the first blast bearing the names of those killed.

    “We will never forget,” it reads.

    Not that people here ever could. Nearly two years after the attacks, which paralyzed the city and shocked the world, many in Boston are still recovering from the bombs which killed three people and injured nearly 300, including 16 who lost limbs. Now the city is preparing to relive the gruesome horror all over again.

    RELATED: Who's who trial for Boston Marathon bombing trial

    Jury selection began Monday for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the 21-year-old surviving suspect in the attacks. He is accused of plotting and carrying out the twin

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  • Who's who in trial for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

    A guide to the family, friends and associates of the accused Boston Marathon bomber

  • Boston bombing suspect Tsarnaev wants 'supporters’ moved away from courthouse

    Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's attorneys say 'inflammatory’ protesters are hurting his right to a fair trial

    Accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is asking a federal judge to clamp down on “self-appointed supporters” protesting on his behalf outside a Boston courthouse, arguing that their “inflammatory accusations” could hurt his right to a fair trial.

    In a court filing Monday, Tsarnaev’s defense team sought to distance themselves from the demonstrators, arguing they could have a “deleterious and prejudicial impact” on his trial, which is set to begin Jan. 5. The supporters, his attorneys wrote, “advocate various conspiracy theories concerning the marathon bombing, including that the resulting deaths and injuries have somehow been faked as part of a government plot.”

    Tsarnaev’s lawyers asked federal Judge George O’Toole, who is overseeing the case, to direct the U.S. Marshals Service to move the demonstrators away from the courthouse, because their presence implies that Tsarnaev agrees with them.

    “Survivors, jurors, witnesses and members of the public must be able to attend court

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