Blog Posts by Holly Bailey, Yahoo News

  • Documentary tells the real story of the man who inspired 'Dog Day Afternoon'

    Of all the crazy crime stories in New York, it remains one of the craziest.

    On Aug. 22, 1972, John Wojtowicz, a 27-year-old Vietnam vet, along with a friend, an 18-year-old ex-con named Salvatore Naturale, tried to rob a Chase Manhattan bank in Brooklyn when their getaway driver fled and the cops showed up.

    The robbery, which later inspired Sidney Lumet’s 1975 film “Dog Day Afternoon,” had been Wojtowicz’s idea. He wanted the money to help the man he called his wife pay for a $3,000 sex change operation. The botched holdup resulted in a 14-hour hostage standoff with police and was an instant news sensation, thanks in part to the mix of crime and sexuality as well as Wojtowicz’s larger-than-life personality.

    The robbery ended violently, with Naturale shot dead during a getaway attempt and Wojtowicz sent to prison. Four years later, Al Pacino was nominated for an Academy Award for “Dog Day Afternoon,” a role that was based on Wojtowicz.

    After a viewing of “Dog Day Afternoon” several

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  • CNN, NBC scrap Hillary Clinton films

    Two planned films about Hillary Clinton were scrapped within hours of each other Monday, amid claims from one director that interview subjects had been intimidated by Clinton aides who didn't want to see the project move forward.

    CNN Films canceled a planned documentary about Clinton Monday morning after Charles Ferguson, the project’s director, abruptly dropped out of the project and said the Clinton camp had pressured people not to talk to him.

    Hours later, NBC followed suit, announcing it would scrap a planned fictional miniseries about the former first lady and secretary of state that had been set to star actress Diane Lane. In a statement to Deadline, NBC said it had nixed its Clinton miniseries "after reviewing and prioritizing our slate of movie/mini-series development" — but offered no further explanation.

    Ferguson, who had been tapped earlier this year to direct the CNN film, wrote in a piece published on The Huffington Post that he had decided to cancel the documentary

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  • Hillary Clinton isn't talking about 2016, but hints of a presidential run are there

    NEW YORK — It was one of the most anticipated events of the Clinton Global Initiative’s annual meeting in New York: a panel on “women decision-makers” headlined by Hillary Clinton.

    But 45 minutes into the event Wednesday, the former secretary of state still hadn’t appeared on stage — and reporters who had descended in droves on the meeting to look for clues about her political future were starting to wonder if they had wasted their time.

    Clinton finally arrived 10 minutes before the session was set to end. And once there, she offered no guidance on her political plans — announcing instead she would lead an effort to evaluate women’s progress around the world to coincide with the 20th anniversary of a United Nations conference on women’s rights held in Beijing in 1995.

    That conference marked a pivotal moment in Clinton’s rise as a recognized champion of women’s rights around the world — a moment when, as first lady, she spoke out more forcefully against the abuse of women and girls in

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  • At the Clinton Global Initiative, a day of policy, celebrities and political intrigue

    NEW YORK — The man lingered for minutes, whispering to a colleague and motioning toward a woman with a slight nod of his head. He moved closer and slyly held up his iPhone, squinting at the screen. He snapped a photo when he thought no one was looking.

    The man made a more assertive move moments later, tentatively tapping the woman on the shoulder.

    “Goldie,” the man stammered in a heavily French accent. “Goldie, I really admire the philanthropic work you do.”

    The actress Goldie Hawn whirled around. She was dressed in tight gray jeans and a black tank top — Southern California chic on a cool New York day. “Oh,” she cheerfully told the man, “thank you.”

    “I really do,” the man said. “Um ... would you take a picture with me?”

    Hawn obliged and posed for several.

    It was a scene that played out several times on Tuesday on the opening day of the Clinton Global Initiative’s annual meeting in New York — former President Bill Clinton’s annual confab focused on the do-gooder projects his

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  • Grieving families of marathon bombing victims face question of life or death for Tsarnaev

    There are moments when Lillian Campbell still believes her granddaughter, Krystle, might walk through her front door, with her bright blue eyes, radiant smile and easy laugh.

    But that feeling is inevitably followed by the dark realization that Campbell will never see her granddaughter again. Krystle Campbell, 29, was one of the three people killed when two bombs ripped through the crowds packed near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15 — causing her family a level of grief they are still struggling to deal with five months later.

    “You just feel pain,” Lillian Campbell said. “Her mother and father aren’t coping too well. None of us are. We’ll never forget her, and we’ll never forget what happened, but the steady reminder of it, in the news and people talking about it, it’s almost too much for us sometimes.”

    Compounding that grief for the Campbell family and others affected by the bombing is the question of whether suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev should face the death penalty if

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  • Art inspired by how the brain sees

    New York artist Devorah Sperber had been carving sculptures out of substances like volcanic rock, limestone and alabaster when a digital photo of one of her past works suddenly provided new inspiration.

    It was the mid-1990s — the early days of digital photography — and Sperber was captivated by how her three-dimensional sculpture had been transformed into what she once described as pixels of “digital nothingness.”

    The photo prompted Sperber to consider how the brain makes sense of what it sees and motivated her to pursue a different kind of sculpture-making, one that explores the relationship between art, technology and how the human mind processes information.

    Since then, Sperber has deconstructed famous images of art and pop culture like Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” by using thousands of pieces of ordinary objects, including spools of thread, pen caps, tacks, beads and Swarovski crystals.

    The result is manually pixelated art, abstractions that look familiar but only become clear when

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  • Interactive documentary explores the 'broken hopes' in the West Bank after the Oslo peace accords

    CLICK IMAGE for slideshow: West Bank, 02 June 2013 Portrait of Ayman's son, burnt during a Molotov cocktail attack by settlers. (Photographs by Cedric Gerbehaye / Agence VU)CLICK IMAGE for slideshow: West Bank, 02 June 2013 Portrait of Ayman's son, burnt during a Molotov cocktail attack by settlers. (Photographs by Cedric Gerbehaye / Agence VU)

    It remains one of the most historic handshakes in history.

    On Sept. 13, 1993, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Yasser Arafat, chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization, stood within the embrace of President Bill Clinton on the south lawn of the White House and shook hands on an agreement aimed at ending a bloody conflict that had divided their people for more than 100 years.

    The Oslo peace accords, brokered after months of secret negotiations, surprised the world and sparked hope that the Israelis and Palestinians would soon find a way to coexist in peace.

    But 20 years later, that hasn’t happened. Israel still occupies the disputed West Bank. The Palestinians are still no closer to their own independent state. And there is extreme disillusionment among the civilians on both sides who live in the region — a feeling photojournalist Cedric Gerbehaye documents in his new multimedia project “Broken Hopes,” which documents life in the West Bank after the Oslo accords.Photographer Cédric Gerbehaye. (Photo by Stephan Vanfleteren)Photographer Cédric Gerbehaye. (Photo by Stephan Vanfleteren)

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  • Is New York unwilling to elect a gay, woman mayor? In Quinn's loss, no clear answer

    New York City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, returning to the public eye two days after a disappointing third place finish in the city’s Democratic mayoral primary, faced the inevitable question: "What happened?"

    “I think what happened is that Bill de Blasio won,” Quinn told reporters Thursday, referring to the city’s public advocate, who won roughly 40 percent of the vote in the primary compared to her 15.5 percent.

    But Quinn also confronted a more uncomfortable suggestion: is New York City, viewed across the U.S. as a beacon of liberal, progressive politics, simply not inclined to elect a woman mayor, particularly one who is gay?

    “New York City is not incapable of electing a woman mayor. They have not yet elected a woman mayor. Those are two very different statements," Quinn insisted.

    “There will be an amazing day where history gets made in this city and it will raise all of us higher. It hasn’t happened yet, but we are a city not incapable of anything,” she added. “This city is

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  • Bloomberg won't endorse in NYC mayoral race

    NEW YORK — Outgoing Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Friday he would not endorse a candidate in the race to replace him.

    “I don’t want to do anything that complicates it for the next mayor, and that’s one of the reasons I’ve decided I’m just not gonna make an endorsement in the race,” Bloomberg said during his weekly appearance on WOR Radio.

    Though he never offered a formal endorsement, Bloomberg was said to have preferred City Council Speaker Christine Quinn in the Democratic mayoral primary. But Quinn was defeated by Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, who won, in part, by positioning himself as the anti-Bloomberg in the race.

    Bloomberg lashed out at de Blasio in a New York Magazine interview published only days before the primary — arguing that de Blasio's heavy use of his multiracial family in his mayoral bid was a “racist” campaign tactic and that his crusade against income inequality in the city was “class warfare.”

    There had been speculation that Bloomberg might back Republican nominee

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  • Democrats seek to avoid runoff in NYC mayoral election

    NEW YORK — Leading Democrats and unions began to coalesce around Public Advocate Bill de Blasio’s campaign for mayor as party officials stepped up their pressure on former Comptroller Bill Thompson to bow out of a potential runoff election.

    The push came as de Blasio held a raucous rally with several hundred supporters in downtown Brooklyn, where he touted the endorsements of several prominent unions and elected officials who had previously backed City Council Speaker Christine Quinn in the Democratic primary. That list included Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz and the Hotel Trades Council, one of the most powerful unions in the city.

    At the same time, Quinn, the onetime mayoral front-runner who finished a distant third in Tuesday’s vote, was holding her own event at City Hall, where she stopped short of formally endorsing de Blasio but indicated she would “enthusiastically support the Democratic nominee.”

    “It’s clear to most folks that is going to be Bill de Blasio,” Quinn

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Pagination

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