Blog Posts by Holly Bailey

  • De Blasio wins NYC mayoral primary but may still face runoff

    NEW YORK — Bill de Blasio closed in on a decisive victory in Tuesday’s Democratic mayoral primary while onetime front-runner Christine Quinn conceded a stinging defeat.

    But it was not immediately clear if de Blasio, the city’s public advocate, would secure the 40 percent of votes necessary to win the primary outright and avoid a runoff election against former Comptroller Bill Thompson, who was polling in second place.

    At his election night party in Brooklyn, de Blasio delivered a resounding victory speech, praising supporters who stuck with him during the months when his campaign was drawing little public support. But he credited his stance as the "unapologetically progressive alternative to the Bloomberg era" for helping him break through.

    "The 'tale of two cities' will be no more," de Blasio said, referring to a phrase he's used to accuse the Bloomberg administration of focusing on a "chosen few" at the cost of the middle class and the poor. "The building of one city will be our

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  • NYC voters head to the polls in first step of picking a new mayor

    NEW YORK — Voters headed to the polls Tuesday in what has been one of the city’s wildest and most unpredictable primaries in more than a decade as residents of the nation’s largest city begin the process of choosing a successor to outgoing Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

    It’s the first time in 12 years that New Yorkers are picking a new mayor, and while Bloomberg isn’t on the ballot, it’s a race that increasingly has been about him and his legacy on everything from income inequality to affordable housing and  public safety.

    On the Democratic side, polls showed Public Advocate Bill de Blasio within striking distance of the 40 percent threshold necessary to avoid a runoff election.

    A Quinnipiac poll released Monday found de Blasio with 39 percent support among likely Democratic voters — a major lead over former Comptroller Bill Thompson, who had 25 percent support; and City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who had 18 percent. The other candidates, including former Rep. Anthony Weiner, trailed

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  • Polls show de Blasio remains the frontrunner heading into Tuesday's NYC mayoral primary

    NEW YORK — Public Advocate Bill de Blasio remains the candidate to beat in the city’s Democratic mayoral primary as two new polls showed him with a commanding lead heading into Tuesday’s voting.

    A Quinnipiac University survey released Monday found de Blasio leading the race, with 39 percent support among likely Democratic primary voters. That’s a 14-point lead over former Comptroller Bill Thompson, who had 25 percent support. City Council Speaker Christine Quinn had 18 percent support, while the other candidates were in single digits, including former Rep. Anthony Weiner, with 6 percent; Comptroller John Liu, 4 percent and 1 percent for former council member Sal Albanese.

    Eight percent remain undecided heading into Tuesday, according to Quinnipiac — which reported a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percent.

    Those findings came just hours after a Wall Street Journal/NBC 4 New York/Marist poll released Sunday night found de Blasio with 36 percent support among likely Democratic

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  • Bloomberg says NYC mayoral hopeful de Blasio has run a 'racist' campaign

    NEW YORK—Outgoing Mayor Michael Bloomberg finally broke his silence on the campaign to succeed him, saying in an interview published Saturday that he believes Democratic mayoral frontrunner Bill de Blasio has run a “racist” campaign based on “class warfare.”

    In an interview with New York Magazine published just days before the Sept. 10 mayoral primary, Bloomberg tore into de Blasio, the city’s public advocate, accusing him of playing up his multiracial family to win support.

    “I mean he’s making an appeal using his family to gain support. I think it’s pretty obvious to anyone watching what he’s been doing,” Bloomberg said. “I do not think he himself is racist. It’s comparable to me pointing out that I am Jewish in attracting the Jewish vote. You tailor messages to your audiences and address issues you think your audience cares about.”

    De Blasio, an Italian American, campaigns almost daily with his wife, Chirlane McCray, who is black. Their kids—Chiara, 18, and Dante, 15—have been

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  • Will Bloomberg step into NYC mayor's race to protect his legacy?

    NEW YORK — For months, Mayor Michael Bloomberg has barely been able to contain his disdain for reporters asking him questions about the race to replace him as leader of the nation's largest city.

    “These questions aren’t substantive and don’t inform the public,” Bloomberg ranted at a press conference in March when asked if he'd make an endorsement. “If I have something to say, I’ll say it directly to the public, and who I am going to vote for I may never choose to say.”

    But even as Bloomberg has remained silent in the runup to next week’s mayoral primaries, two major questions remain: Will he inch off the sidelines to back a candidate he believes will protect his legacy? And will he spend part of his estimated $27 billion fortune to run ads against a candidate he believes might try to undermine his 12 years at City Hall?

    It was initially expected that Bloomberg would throw his support behind City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, a close ally who led the effort to overturn a

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  • Weiner gets into a shouting match with a Jewish voter in NYC

    NEW YORK — Anthony Weiner got into a shouting match with a Jewish voter while campaigning for mayor on Wednesday after the man called him “disgusting” and said he should “stay out of the public eye” for the sexting scandal that has derailed his bid for City Hall.

    The confrontation happened as Weiner was campaigning in the Borough Park section of Brooklyn — a heavily Jewish neighborhood where he was also heckled in July after he admitted he had continued to engage in sexual chats with women he met online even after he was forced out of Congress for similar behavior.

    The exchange, which was captured on video by a reporter with the Yeshiva World, occurred as Weiner was exiting a local bakery. The former congressman — his mouth full of food — began shouting at the man, who called him a "deviant." According to a separate video of the incident released by the Weiner campaign — which you can see below — the man also referenced Weiner's wife, longtime Hillary Clinton aide Huma Abedin, saying

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  • Eliot Spitzer hasn't alienated female voters in NYC comptroller race: Poll

    NEW YORK — Five years after a prostitution scandal forced him out of office, Eliot Spitzer’s push for political redemption has found surprising traction with a voting bloc that had been expected to be hostile to his bid for city comptroller: women.

    A new Quinnipiac University poll found Spitzer narrowly trailing rival Scott Springer ahead of next week’s Democratic primary — 45 percent to Stringer’s 47 percent, a result that is still within the poll’s plus or minus 3.6 percent margin of error.

    The poll suggests one reason the race is so tight is because female voters haven’t totally opposed Spitzer’s bid as some predicted when he joined the race in early July. According to Quinnipiac, Stringer, the Manhattan borough president, has only a 1-point advantage over Spitzer among female voters, 46 percent to Spitzer’s 45 percent.

    Those results come in spite of a major push from the Stringer campaign in recent weeks to woo female voters. Last week, his campaign launched a “Women for Stringer”

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  • Trailing in the polls, Christine Quinn tries to regain momentum in NYC mayoral race

    NEW YORK — Christine Quinn sat atop the polls for so long that she once seemed almost invincible and a clear successor to outgoing Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

    But with less than a week before voters head to the polls in the Sept. 10 Democratic primary, Quinn, the City Council speaker who is vying to be the city’s first female and first openly gay mayor, is in the fight of her political life.

    In a race that has become increasingly unpredictable in recent weeks, polls now suggest she’s trailing newly christened front-runner Bill de Blasio by a wide-enough margin that there’s the risk she might not even make a runoff election — if there is one.

    A Quinnipiac poll released on Tuesday found Quinn trailing de Blasio by 25 points — 18 to 43 percent. She was statistically tied for second place with former Comptroller Bill Thompson, who had 20 percent support in the poll.

    Quinn has dismissed the polls in recent days — insisting to reporters her campaign has been stymied by false attacks and that

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  • New poll shows clear leader in NYC Democratic mayoral primary

    NEW YORK — Just one week before the Sept. 10 primary, a new poll suggests Bill de Blasio could possibly avoid a runoff in the Democratic race for mayor.

    A Quinnipiac University survey released Tuesday found that 43 percent of likely Democratic voters are backing de Blasio’s bid to replace outgoing Mayor Michael Bloomberg — just past the 40 percent threshold needed to avoid a runoff election.

    De Blasio, who is the city’s public advocate, has a 23-point lead over his closest contender, former Comptroller Bill Thompson, who is in second place at 20 percent. City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, once the front-runner in the race, has slipped to 18 percent support.

    The other contenders in the race are in single digits, including former Rep. Anthony Weiner, at 7 percent, Comptroller John Liu at 4 percent and former City Council member Sal Albanese at 1 percent. Eight percent of voters remain undecided, according to the poll, which reported a plus or minus 3.6 percentage point margin of

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  • At Visa pour l'Image, proof that photojournalism isn't dead

    CLICK IMAGE for slideshow: An anti-government protestor reacts as he and other demonstrators shout slogans during a demonstration demanding the resignation of Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, in Sanaa, Yemen on March 1, 2011. (Photo by Muhammed Muheisen/AP)CLICK IMAGE for slideshow: An anti-government protestor reacts as he and other demonstrators shout slogans during a demonstration demanding the resignation of Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh, in Sanaa, Yemen on March 1, 2011. (Photo by Muhammed Muheisen/AP)

    When the Chicago Sun-Times laid off its entire photo staff in June, it revived what has become an all-too frequent argument in the media: Do we really need photojournalists?

    For some, the iPhone era has ushered in the notion that everybody is a photographer — and sometimes it feels true. Some of the first images of major news events such as the Boston Marathon bombing and the uprising in Egypt came via photos posted on Twitter and other social media sites, where hundreds of pictures are posted every second.

    But Jean-François Leroy is on a mission to remind the world that the most enduring news images still come from photojournalists, people who know that documenting the stories the public needs to see often involves more than simply clicking a shutter.

    “If you are a photographer, you rarely make a picture by accident. You are working, you are making inquiries, you worked to find your subjects, you worked to get into the position where you could make that picture, you are trying to tell

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