Blog Posts by Joe Pompeo

  • Anthony Weiner’s tabloid treatment

    We at The Cutline are as burned out on the Anthony Weiner sexting saga as anyone else. Still, who can resist a good old-fashioned tabloid cover the morning after the (official) conclusion of a national political scandal? Today's winner is the New York Post, never one to be robbed of the opportunity to put a sexual pun on its, well, on its wood! (That's journal-ese for "front page headlines.") You can check out how the rest of the New York tabs handled the congressman's resignation after the jump.

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    Read More »from Anthony Weiner’s tabloid treatment
  • FIRST CUTS: ‘Page One’ panned by the Times; Norah O’Donnell to CBS

    Here's our list of headlines that should be on your morning media menu:

    • The New York Times has panned Andrew Rossi's movie about the New York Times. (NYT)

    • Norah O'Donnell is moving from NBC to CBS, where she will be the network's chief White House correspondent. (Politico)

    • NPR is pushing a new digital initiative. (WSJ)

    • Facebook's iPad app is almost ready for its big debut. (NYT/Bits)

    • The kissing couple in the Vancouver hockey riot photo revealed? (BI/The Sports Page)

    Read More »from FIRST CUTS: ‘Page One’ panned by the Times; Norah O’Donnell to CBS
  • In Media Res: ReadyMade folds; Paris Review gets digital

    tinaAP071202055936Brown is bananas: If there's one thing the world needs, it is another Tina Brown profile. This time she gets the Vogue treatment: "When she returns, she flops down on the banquette, fixes those steely blue eyes on mine, and says, 'This is some week.' Not that there is any other kind for Brown these days. As the newly installed editor in chief of [Newsweek], as well as the head of the two-year-old Web site the Daily Beast, she is lucky if she gets four hours of sleep a night. 'It's bananas,' says Brown." She sure does love her lingo.

    Another one bites the dust: Meredith has shuttered the popular DIY magazine ReadyMade and eliminated 75 jobs in the process. "Positioning Meredith for continued growth requires periodic realignment of resources, including how we deploy our workforce," Meredith Chairman-CEO Steve Lacy said in a statement to AdAge.  "These actions will enable us to devote additional resources to key strategic growth initiatives, including digital platform expansion."

    Vertical vertigo: Breaking! The Huffington Post is launching a new vertical. First the site gave us divorce. Then it gave us Canada. Now, get ready for Huff/Post 40, a site launching in August for the Baby Boomer set. Actress Rita Wilson has been tapped as editor-at-large. "Calling the site 'Huff/Post 40' was her idea," said Arianna Huffington in a statement. "Her belief that it's never too late to follow your dreams makes her the perfect godmother for Huff/Post 40 as it takes shape." "It's never too late to mix things up, change your life, to get to what you really should be doing--or want to be doing," Wilson added. Cue Mark Twain quote: "'Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter.' I can't wait to get started." Next up? We hear the site is currently at work on launching a gay vertical.

    Read More »from In Media Res: ReadyMade folds; Paris Review gets digital
  • guardian-ukThe Guardian is in the process of putting together the team that will steer its forthcoming U.S. website, which the U.K. broadsheet's parent company hopes to have up and running by the fall.

    Starting next month, four editorial hands, "a few techies and a few promotional people" from The Guardian's London headquarters will start recruiting the New York-based staff, Guardian editor-in-chief Alan Rusbridger told The Cutline by phone Thursday. The newsroom will be comprised of some combination of 20 to 30 editors, reporters, bloggers and web producers/developers. The site will also have its own publisher, likely an American, said Rusbridger; both the editor-in-chief and chief revenue officer were named earlier this year.

    "It will be a gradual build. As revenue comes in, we'll expand." he said, adding that the site could be up and running as early as September.

    Read More »from Guardian staffs up planned U.S. website as ‘major’ digital ‘transformation’ begins
  • FIRST CUTS: Congressional media investments; media’s new power couple

    Here's our list of headlines that should be on your morning media menu:

    • "U.K. tabloids: Threat or menace?" asks Jack Shafer. (Slate)

    • Daily News editor Kevin Convey chats about "the lingering competition in New York City's tabloid detente." (New York Observer)

    • How much are members of Congress investing in big media companies? (Adweek)

    • Meet "media's latest power couple"--CNBC's Nicole Lapin and the New York Times' Brian Stelter, who will "refrain from covering CNBC in a significant way in the future." (Business Insider/The Wire)

    Read More »from FIRST CUTS: Congressional media investments; media’s new power couple
  • Libya now in civil war, according to the AP

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    Reporters have used various terms to describe the ongoing skirmishes between rebels and government forces in Libya these past three months--conflict, turmoil, strife, violent unrest, etc. But one of the more delicate phrasings just got green-lit by the one of world's most influential news organizations.

    "In early March, we issued guidance that we should not refer to the conflict in Libya flat-out as a 'civil war,' " wrote Tom Kent, the AP's deputy managing editor for standards, in a staff memo obtained by the Huffington Post. "We're changing that guidance now. It is a civil war. We avoided the term initially because of the short duration of the conflict. But it has gone on now at length, and shows no sign of ending."

    Other news outlets (including the blog you are reading), have referred to the fighting as a "civil war" in their reports. But the AP appears to be the first news service to upgrade its official characterization, which, as HuffPo notes, can go a long way in shaping public

    Read More »from Libya now in civil war, according to the AP
  • New York Times’ Sunday Review to debut June 26

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    After months of planning, the New York Times' newest section, the Sunday Review, will debut June 26. The date was confirmed in an email invitation for a June 23 preview breakfast sent to media reporters Wednesday afternoon. During that session, editorial page editor Andy Rosenthal, op-ed editor Trish Hall, outgoing executive editor Bill Keller and newly named opinion columnist Frank Bruni will show off the Sunday Review, slated to replace the Times's opinion-and-analysis section, the Week in Review, for the first Time next Thursday. (Times obsessives did get some early background on the project courtesy of  a report by HuffPo's Michael Calderone in May.)

    The most striking immediate innovations in the new section are visual. The design overhaul will include long-form opinion pieces by the Gray Lady's marquee columnists appearing on the front page alongside traditional reporting from Times beat journalists.

    Read More »from New York Times’ Sunday Review to debut June 26
  • Olbermann builds hype for new show with media blitz

    keith-olbermann_lAs anticipation builds ahead of Keith Olbermann's return to prime time Monday night after his abrupt departure from MSNBC in January, David Carr's New York Times Magazine profile of the bombastic anchor has landed online.

    The piece covers the expected bases: Olbermann's fiery split with his former network, his combative tendencies, the prospects for his new show on Current TV and his love of baseball.

    As with any good profile, Carr placed the best anecdote in the lede, in which we find the two veteran newsmen at a Yankees-Mets game in late May:

    Read More »from Olbermann builds hype for new show with media blitz
  • joelockScreen shot 2011-06-15 at 9.55.03 AMFacebook wasn't able to lure the most recent former White House press secretary into a job as its new communications chief. But it had better luck with a presidential flack of yore.

    The social networking giant has tapped Joe Lockhart, who helped Bill Clinton navigate his impeachment hearings during a stint as White House press secretary from 1998 to 2000, as its vice president of global communications.

    "His experience building and running a press office at the White House gives him particular appreciation for the demands of a global 24-hour news cycle and the challenges of responding effectively to intense scrutiny," Lockhart's new boss, Elliot Schrage, told AllThingsD, which broke the news Tuesday.

    Read More »from Facebook hires former White House press secretary after not hiring other former White House press secretary
  • FIRST CUTS: Ratings victory for CNN; Nikki Finke slams outgoing publisher

    Here's our list of headlines that should be on your morning media menu:

    • CNN's debate coverage brought it a ratings win Monday night. (Media Decoder)

    • Nikki Finke's publisher at Deadline.com is heading back to the rival Hollywood Reporter. (The Wrap)

    • Not surprisingly, Finke already has some dirt on her. (Deadline)

    • Nat Ives checks in on the Wall Street Journal's Greater New York section. (AdAge)

    • Company Town checks in with Fox News Channel's late-night sensation, "Red Eye," as it hits 1,000 episodes. (L.A. Times)

    • News Corp. COO Chase Carey talks MySpace and cable TV with Liz Claman. (Fox Business Network)

    Read More »from FIRST CUTS: Ratings victory for CNN; Nikki Finke slams outgoing publisher

Pagination

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