Blog Posts by Joe Pompeo

  • FIRST CUTS: The end of the Murdochs?; Keller scraps magazine column

    Our list of stories that should be on your morning media menu:

    • Pressure on James Murdoch in the phone-hacking investigation is intensifying. (New York Times)

    • "James Murdoch is done. He and his father both know that. ... Rupert Murdoch, as we have long known him, is done as well," writes David Carr. (New York Times)

    • Inside the New York Times' comeback. (New York)

    • Outgoing New York Times executive editor Bill Keller is giving up his magazine column. (WWD)

    Read More »from FIRST CUTS: The end of the Murdochs?; Keller scraps magazine column
  • David Leonhardt named New York Times Washington bureau chief

    (nytimes.com)As expected, David Leonhardt has been named Washington bureau chief of the New York Times.

    The 38-year-old Times vet makes the jump from the paper's business section, where he writes a column that captured this year's Pulitzer Prize for commentary.

    His promotion also marks one of the first significant moves by incoming executive editor Jill Abramson, who will succeed Bill Keller when he steps down on September 6 to become a full-time writer. Abramson had previously tapped Leonhardt's predecessor in D.C., Dean Baquet, to replace her as managing editor when she moves up the masthead.

    Leonhardt's pending appointment was first reported Thursday by Politico.

    "David's strengths as a reporter, columnist and magazine writer are dazzling," said Abramson in a statement Friday. "His original take on key issues has strengthened our news report in deep and important ways. His keen understanding of how Washington works and the nexus of politics and economic policy make him a perfect leader of the Washington bureau at this moment. David's creativity is matched by his wonderful collegiality."

    Read More »from David Leonhardt named New York Times Washington bureau chief
  • (Matt Dunham/AP)The sourcing collaborations that WikiLeaks struck up with a cabal of prominent international news organizations last year seem to be something of a game-changing new media model. The controversial whistle-blowing group's partnerships with major press outlets ensured that its vast cache of classified military and diplomatic documents got wide play in the media.

    Now, a like-minded online collective claims it has forged similar relationships in an effort to further expose wrongdoing at News Corp.'s embattled British publishing division News International, as it weathers a severe and fast-spreading scandal over widespread phone-hacking at Rupert Murdoch's tabloid properties.

    And who better to potentially have dug up fresh dirt about the company's alleged phone-hacking practices than, well, a bunch of hackers?

    Read More »from Hacker group claims WikiLeaks-style joint effort with media outlets on News of the World emails
  • FIRST CUTS: The end of James Murdoch?; NYT to name D.C. chief

    Our list of stories that should be on your morning media menu:

    • A former News of the World editor who "could provide more details about which executives might have known about the illegal hacking at the Murdoch-owned tabloid and how widespread it was" is on his way to Britain to meet with police. (New York Times)

    • The Guardian on James Murdoch: "Who are going to be the last men standing at the newspaper empire Rupert Murdoch built up over the last four decades? And will his son and heir-apparent, James, be among them?" (The Guardian)

    • Elsewhere in News Corp., "The Daily is out with a new edition that erases some of the biggest complaints about the iPad tab." (paidContent)

    • It looks like David Leonhardt will be the next New York Times D.C. chief. (Politico)

    • "Times higher-ups have long considered the 38-year-old Leonhardt to be upper management material, and staffers throw around his name in the newsroom parlor game of who could someday become executive editor." (HuffPo)

    Read More »from FIRST CUTS: The end of James Murdoch?; NYT to name D.C. chief
  • Hope for family of U.S. journalist still missing in Libya

    Matthew VanDyke (wbaltv.com)

    As the headlines have turned to phone-hackings, debt ceilings and salacious murder and rape trials, it seems eons ago that The Cutline was writing regularly about the ongoing civil war in Libya; more specifically, about foreign journalists being captured, imprisoned and killed in the restive North African nation.

    At least one American reporter remains missing there, Baltimore-based freelancer Matthew VanDyke, though his family has received some encouraging news.

    VanDyke, who disappeared one week after his arrival in Libya in March to cover the uprising against strongman Muammar Gadhafi, was recently spotted in a prison near the nation's capital Tripoli, his mother and a U.S. congressman confirmed to a local NBC affiliate.

    WBAL TV reports:

    Read More »from Hope for family of U.S. journalist still missing in Libya
  • New York Times happy with digital subscriber totals as net income declines

    (AP)The New York Times Co. just reported a year-over-year net loss for the months of April through June. But there was one nugget of good news in its quarterly earnings release Thursday morning.

    Paid subscriptions for nytimes.com, for which the Times began charging for unlimited access, totaled 224,000 in the second quarter. That's a substantial increase from the 100,000 paid digital subs, including some registered at an introductory promotional rate, that the Times logged when it came out of the gate with its metered online model at the end of March. (The cheapest and most popular digital subscription package costs $15 a month for unlimited access via the web and smartphones.)

    Additionally, the second-quarter earnings report brought news that the Times had added 57,000 e-reader downloads, bringing the paper of record's total paid digital subscriber count to 281,000. Home delivery subscriptions, which come with free access to the Times' digital editions, have likewise increased since mid-March--by the end of the quarter 756,000 home subscribers had taken advantage of dual print-web access.

    "We are pleased with how this initiative is rolling out," said Times Co. CEO Janet Robinson in prepared remarks on a conference call with analysts. Looking ahead, she added: "The full potential of our new digital model will become more evident as the year progresses, providing us with a significant new revenue stream in the second half of the year."

    Read More »from New York Times happy with digital subscriber totals as net income declines
  • Changes at MSNBC: Al Sharpton, Chris Hayes on the way

    MSNBC is on the verge of hiring the Rev. Al Sharpton for its 6 p.m. hour, the New York Times reports.

    The activist and radio personality has been guest-hosting the time slot for the past several weeks. MSNBC's interim 6 p.m. anchor, Cenk Uygur, of the influential webcast "The Young Turks," has parted ways with the network because, he claims, his "tone" was too strong and "people in Washington are concerned."

    In a video posted on his YouTube channel last night, Uygur says he was offered an alternate contributor role at the network for "a lot of money," but turned it down.

    Read More »from Changes at MSNBC: Al Sharpton, Chris Hayes on the way
  • FIRST CUTS: How widespread was phone hacking?; September issues

    Our list of stories that should be on your morning media menu:

    • Just how far did the phone hacking spread beyond News of the World? (New York Times)

    • Has News Corp. failed "crisis management 101" ? (Wall Street Journal)

    • Wendi Murdoch is the talk of the London press. (WWD)

    • It looks like Al Sharpton is officially moving into MSNBC's 6 p.m. slot. (New York Times)

    • Vogue's September issue is looking thick--and ahead of the pack. (AdAge)

    Read More »from FIRST CUTS: How widespread was phone hacking?; September issues
  • Our list of stories that should be on your morning media menu:

    • Some News Corp. shareholders cringed over Rupert Murdoch's performance at yesterday's parliamentary testimony. (Wall Street Journal)

    • Still: "Instead of finding a signal that this was the beginning of the end of Rupert Murdoch's run at the helm of his company, analysts stressed that there was no single revelatory moment during the proceedings." (New York Times)

    • How Wall Street Journal managing editor Robert Thomson has been handling his paper's coverage of the phone-hacking fallout. (Huffington Post)

    • Attorney General Eric Holder has agreed to meet with families of 9/11 victims concerned News of the World journalists may have attempted to obtain their loved ones phone records. (Reuters)

    Read More »from FIRST CUTS: Shareholders assess Murdoch performance; Bachmann bodyguards rough up ABC’s Ross
  • Wall Street Journal: We have editorial independence from Murdoch

    (TalkingBizNews.com)

    The Wall Street Journal has followed up Monday's controversial editorial with a bylined opinion piece today that insists that the paper's owner, News Corp. chairman Rupert Murdoch, takes a hands-off approach to determining news coverage in the august broadsheet.

    Yesterday's commentary blasted the aggressive approach many news outlets that compete with News Corp. properties have taken in reporting the widening phone-hacking scandal. The unsigned editorial also essentially blamed Scotland Yard for failing to ensure that criminal journalistic practices didn't get out of hand at News Corp.'s recently shuttered British tabloid, News of the World.

    But if anyone had suspected that Murdoch, who has issued a heartfelt public apology for the phone-hacking, may have used his flagship U.S. paper's editorial page as a vehicle for retaliation, editorial features editor Robert Pollock issued a strong rebuke to that view. The Journal, he held, has editorial independence from the broader designs of its corporate owner.

    "If Rupert Murdoch has a thought-out plan to influence politics and the op-ed editor of The Wall Street Journal doesn't know about it, it must be a very subtle plan indeed," Pollock writes. "I used to run into Mr. Murdoch pretty often ... Encouraging words were offered sometimes, but again no editorial direction. Had I missed a memo? Was he operating in subtler ways? Well, my editors also weren't pushing topics or candidates or agendas or articles on me. I was, frankly, amazed at what a young editor like me was being allowed to do and decide."

    Read More »from Wall Street Journal: We have editorial independence from Murdoch

Pagination

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