Authorities Arrest Man Behind 'Innocence of Muslims' Video

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Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, believed to be the producer of an anti-Muslim YouTube film trailer that's fueling protests worldwide, was arrested Thursday in California on charges of parole violation.

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Nakoula, who wore a sheet around his face during his arrest to avoid reporters' cameras, was ordered held without bail, according to CNN.

"He engaged in a likely pattern of deception both to his probation officers and the court," said Judge Suzanne Segal when deciding not to set bail.

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Nakoula was sentenced to a five-year parole for bank fraud in 2010, one of the terms of which was a prohibition against using an alias without his parole officer's permission. When the video first made headlines several weeks ago, Nakoula's identity was a mystery -- he used 17 pseudonyms, according to court documents. On Thursday, he told the judge his name was "Mark Basseley Yousseff."

While arguing for a $10,000 bail, Nakoula's lawyer argued it wouldn't be safe for Nakoula to be sent to jail.

"It is a danger for him to remain in custody at the Metropolitan Detention Center in Los Angeles because there are a large number of Muslims in there," said the lawyer.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert Dugdale, however, pointed to a probation report showing eight instances where Nakoula violated his terms of parole. Dugdale argued those violations were proof that Nakoula is untrustworthy and may leave California.

A date for Nakoula's next court appearance has not yet been set.

SEE ALSO: The Strange Details of the YouTube Clip Sparking Mideast Protests

The film, titled "Innocence of Muslims," has been blocked in Egypt and Libya and has caused protests in dozens of countries, many near United States diplomatic posts or other American symbols.

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, carlballou

This story originally published on Mashable here.

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