Ben Vereen files for divorce from wife of 36 years

Associated Press
FILE - In this June 14, 2011 file photo, Ben Vereen arrives at the opening night performance of the Broadway musical "Spider-Man Turn Off the Dark" in New York. Court records show Vereen filed for divorce from his wife of 36 years, Nancy Bruner Vereen, on Sept. 13, 2012. The actor-dancer cited irreconcilable differences for the breakup and his filing indicated the couple separated in March. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes, File)

View gallery

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Tony Award-winning actor Ben Vereen has filed for divorce from his wife of 36 years.

Court records in Los Angeles show Vereen filed the petition on Thursday, citing irreconcilable differences. The actor-dancer married wife Nancy Bruner Vereen in July 1976, although his filing states the pair separated in March.

The 65-year-old won a best actor in a musical Tony Award in 1973 for his role in "Pippin" and he appeared in numerous films and television series. His acting credits vary from a role in the miniseries "Roots" and a guest stint on "How I Met Your Mother," as well as a Golden Globe nominated performance in the film "Funny Lady."

Vereen is asking a court to terminate his estranged wife's ability to collect spousal support.

Sorry you didn't like this comment. Please provide a reason below.

Are you sure?
Rating failed. Try again.
Request failed. Try again.
We will promote constructive and witty comments to the top, so everyone sees them!
Sorry, we can’t load comments right now. Try again.

    Recommended for You

    • Family Heartbroken After 4-Year-Old Is Killed by New Dog Dropped Off Minutes Earlier

      The owner reportedly dropped the dog off less than an hour before the attack.

      Inside Edition
    • Philippines Duterte tells U.S. to forget about defense deal 'if I stay longer'

      Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte hit out at the United States on Tuesday, saying he did not start a fight with Washington and it could forget about a military agreement between both countries if he were to be in power longer. Duterte said he was against the presence of any foreign troops in his country and the United States could "forget" an Enhanced Defence Cooperation Agreement (EDCA) with the Philippines, if he stayed longer, without elaborating. The United States, he said, should not treat the Philippines "like a dog with a leash", adding to confusion about the future the longtime allies' ties.

    • Teen Girls Arrested After Video of Assault on Man, 62, Appears on Facebook

      Two girls, one 14 and one 15, are accused of assaulting a 62-year-old man who told them to get off his lawn.

      Inside Edition
    • Ex-attorney general sentenced to jail, then cuffed in court

      NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP) — Former state Attorney General Kathleen Kane, once a rising star in state politics, left a courtroom in handcuffs on Monday after getting a 10- to 23-month sentence for a retaliation scheme a judge linked to her all-consuming ego.

      Associated Press
    • Driverless truck from Uber's Otto makes Colorado beer delivery

      A self-driving truck built by Uber's unit Otto made a pioneering delivery of beer in Colorado last week, Otto announced Tuesday. The 18-wheel semi loaded down with Budweiser made the 120 mile (200 kilometer) trip from Fort Collins through the center of crowded Denver to Colorado Springs using only its panoply of cameras, radar and sensors to read the road. The test came just six weeks after Uber launched its demonstration self-driving car service in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, gaining a jump on the many automakers that are now developing systems for cars and trucks to pilot themselves.

      AFP Relax News
    • Pediatricians: Babies should sleep in same room as parents

      SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The American Academy of Pediatrics is calling for infants to be kept in their parents' bedroom at night for six months to a year to reduce the risk of sleep-related death.

      Associated Press
    • Alert level raised for Alaska volcano after explosion detected

      Cleveland Volcano, a 5,676-foot (1,730-metre) peak on the uninhabited Chuginadak Island, about 940 miles (1,504 km) southwest of Anchorage, was raised to orange from yellow by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. The observatory said that an explosion was detected on Cleveland by both infrasound and seismic data and heard by residents of Nikolski, a settlement of less than 50 people on Umnak Island about 45 miles (72 km) to the east. Scientists said that cloudy weather obscured Cleveland's peak in satellite images but that no evidence of an eruption cloud had been detected at a height of 28,000 feet (8,534.4 meters).

    • 10 pumpkin recipes that make us glad it’s autumn (10 photos)

      It’s October and supermarket shelves across the country are groaning under the weight of piles of little orange globes. Not doing Halloween chez yours this year? Then you could be forgiven for leaving them there but you’d be making a big mistake. We’ve already told you how your pumpkin leftovers can make you hotter , but guess what? They can make you healthier, too. Pumpkin flesh is packed with tummy-filling fibre, vision-boosting vitamin A, cancer-fighting beta-carotene and immunity-enhancing vitamin C. That’s before we even get onto the seeds, whose phytoestrogen and phytosterol content is credited with reducing bad cholesterol, preventing hypertension and enhancing both mood and sleep. Oh, and a single cup of pumpkin puree contains almost as much potassium as the equivalent quantity of coconut water. Meaning your homemade pumpkin spice latte is basically a sports drink. Click through to discover the simplest, tastiest and healthiest ways to squeeze maximum results from this too oft-maltreated member of the squash family.

      Samantha Simmonds, Fashion and Lifestyle Blogger
    • Saunders family presses on with Wolves after Flip's death

      MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The easy thing for the Saunders family to do would have been to walk away.

      Associated Press
    • Inside Edition
    • Philippines' Duterte tells worried foreign businesses to go

      President Rodrigo Duterte on Tuesday urged foreign businesses in the Philippines worried about his deadly drug war to "pack up and leave", as he launched another anti-American tirade before flying to Japan to attract investments. Duterte voiced outrage at comments made the previous day by the top US envoy to Asia that his fiery rhetoric and crime war, which has claimed about 3,700 lives in four months, were bad for business. "These Americans are really crazy," Duterte said, as he held up a newspaper with headlines reporting criticism from US assistant secretary of state Daniel Russel.

    • Model 3 could be Tesla's most reliable car — here's why

      Tesla's low ranking in a recent Consumer Reports reliability survey reveals something compelling about the Model 3.

    • The Latest: Driver in fatal bus crash sued in other wrecks

      PALM SPRINGS, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on a tour bus crash that killed 13 people in Southern California (all times local):

      Associated Press
    • We just entered an alarming 'new era' of global warming

      The Earth permanently passed a global warming threshold last year that alarms climate scientists and has profound consequences for everyone alive today — particularly young people looking forward to the future.  According to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), observatories around the world found that in 2015 and 2016, the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere crossed the symbolic threshold of 400 parts per million (ppm), and that this is likely to remain the case for the foreseeable future.  SEE ALSO: The Great Barrier Reef isn't dead, despite its viral obituary This is the highest level ever seen in all of human history and is 144 percent higher than the pre-industrial average. Such a high level is also very likely the highest on record going back to between 800,000 and 15 million years ago, based on various studies.  For perspective, scientists have found that previous periods with similar carbon dioxide levels — all of which occurred before modern humans evolved — had far higher global average temperatures and sea levels than today. In some cases, such periods had global average sea levels of 100 feet higher than today. 800,000-year history of carbon dioxide levels in Earth's atmosphere, showing the recent spike. Image: Scripps institution of oceanography/mashable Many scientists think that avoiding dangerous climate change will require getting carbon dioxide concentrations down to 350 parts per million, which will require massive emissions cuts and new technologies to push annual emissions into negative numbers. While the planet was flirting with the 400 ppm mark on a month-to-month basis at some observatories, it had not yet breached the line worldwide for an entire year until 2015, the WMO found in a report released Monday.  The rate at which greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane are accumulating in the air guarantees that growing impacts from climate change, ranging from rising sea levels to hotter heat waves and ocean acidification, will continue to occur and in fact worsen in coming decades.  Carbon dioxide levels in 2016, with various emissions scenarios projected through 2100. Image: Climate Central This is in part because carbon dioxide can last in the air for thousands of years, which is why environmental advocates and policymakers say we only have one to two decades at most to act before an unsafe amount of climate change is essentially baked into the climate system.  The WMO report found there was a nearly 40 percent increase in the warming effect on our climate (technically known as "radiative forcing") between 1990 and 2015, due to the increase in greenhouse gases in the air. Scientists at the greenhouse gas monitoring station high atop Mauna Loa in Hawaii have said that carbon dioxide levels will not dip below 400 ppm for many generations, according to a WMO press release on Monday.  “The year 2015 ushered in a new era of optimism and climate action with the Paris climate change agreement. But it will also make history as marking a new era of climate change reality with record high greenhouse gas concentrations,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas in a statement.  In fact, last year saw the largest annual spike in greenhouse gas concentrations on record. Part of this sharp annual uptick is due to the strong 2015-16 El Niño event, which caused droughts in tropical areas that normally absorb carbon as so-called "sinks."  Drier than average weather in such areas, including Indonesia, reduced the ability of tropical forests to suck up as much carbon dioxide as they usually do, and increased the occurrence of forest fires that release carbon dioxide into the air.   “The El Niño event has disappeared,"  Taalas said. "Climate change has not."

    • Trooper's widow urges voters to reject legalizing marijuana

      BOSTON (AP) — The widow of a state trooper killed by a driver accused of driving under the influence of marijuana is making an emotional plea against a ballot question that would legalize recreational pot.

      Associated Press
    • Wayward Pine: Man Dressed as a Tree Arrested for Blocking Traffic

      Police say Asher Woodworth refused to move out of an intersection while covered in pine boughs.

      Inside Edition
    • 'Nothing short of a miracle' how kids survived suicidal bridge fall with dad, police say

      "When the officers found the children -- conscious and alert -- it's nothing short of a miracle, that's for sure," said Captain Christopher Depuyt with the Pequannock Police Department.

      WABC – NY
    • Big 12 hot seats topped by Charlie Strong at Texas

      KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Charlie Strong began his weekly news conference Monday by spending a couple of minutes discussing the multitude of self-inflicted wounds that cost Texas in its lost to Kansas State on Saturday.

      Associated Press
    • China admonishes the U.S. for visit to disputed India-China border

      China admonished the United States on Monday for sending its ambassador in India to a contested stretch of land on the India-China border, warning that a third party's meddling would only complicate the dispute between Beijing and New Delhi. China claims more than 90,000 sq km (35,000 sq miles) of territory disputed by India in the eastern sector of the Himalayas. Much of that forms the Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, which China calls South Tibet.

    • Sick crew forces US-Britain flight to divert to Canada

      A British Airways flight from the United States to Britain had to be diverted to Canada after members of the cabin crew became unwell, the airline said on Tuesday. The crew was taken to hospital in Vancouver "as a precaution" after some staff fell ill two hours into the flight from San Francisco, California, to London Heathrow. The flight was staffed by 22 cabin crew and three pilots.