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Crocodile Caught Roaming Miami Neighborhood

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Courtesy Javier Tobares

Javier Tobares, 41, of South Miami, Fla., woke up to quite a scary sight Wednesday morning around 5:30 a. m.

"The dog started growling so I was alerted because she woke me up," Tobares told ABC News.

When Tobares walked outside his front door to investigate, he was greeted by an unfamiliar and rather unsettling sight.

"I walked outside and I see a couple police cars outside. When I walk out I see this huge crocodile laying there next to my car," Tobares explained.

The crocodile, estimated to be eight to 10 feet long and roughly 250 pounds, had casually been crawling through the neighborhood making its rounds from door to door.

"It actually came through our backyard because there's a canal in the back of the house. There's a chain-link fence, but there was a hurricane a few years ago and knocked it down. We haven't gotten it fixed yet. It must've crawled up through the fence," said Tobares.

Tobares explained he wasn't scared of the croc because the "trapper came and started doing his job" pretty quickly. However, when the Pesky Critters Wildlife Control worker came to take the roaming reptile away, it reportedly started hissing and snapping.

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Courtesy Javier Tobares

"Actually I wasn't really scared. I live in Florida, so I'm used to alligators. But this is the first time I saw a crocodile in my neighborhood. Being a former marine, I've been around a lot of wildlife. But this is the first time I've seen a crocodile," Tobares said.

It wasn't the animal itself that worried Tobares. It was more so the fact he noticed it had already been caught once before.

"We were concerned that it was tagged. That means it's been caught before. I think it was probably relocated in the past. So this guy has been around, he's been caught," explained Tobares.

Only time will tell if the croc will make a come-back. For now though, local reports say the reptile has been moved to an undisclosed body of water away from residential areas and released into its natural habitat.

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