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Superstorm Sandy: Long Lines, No Power Two Weeks Later

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Superstorm Sandy: Long Lines, No Power Two Weeks Later
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Superstorm Sandy: Long Lines, No Power Two Weeks Later (ABC News)

After spending nearly two weeks in the dark, Long Island residents are directing their anger toward their local power company, which many say is out of touch, sending bills instead of updates.

"Nobody knows nothing in the building. Save your breath," a frustrated resident told ABC News.

Nearly two weeks after Superstorm Sandy pummeled the northeast, more than 200,000 in the region are still without power.

PHOTOS: Superstorm Sandy's Wide Swath of Destruction

The Long Island Power Authority did not show up for a last minute overnight press conference today, leaving the company that manages the grid to take the backlash.

"LIPA continues to mobilize additional resources, crews and equipment for the significant restoration efforts underway due to the unprecedented damage to its system by Hurricane Sandy and additional damage from Wednesday's Nor'easter," LIPA officials said in a news release on their website.

"We currently forecast about 95 percent of those customers impcted by the storm will be restored by end of day Tuesday," said John Bruckner of National Grid. "We will continue to work tirelessly until all of them are restored."

While many in the community remain powerless, relying on their cars and generators, access to gasoline has proven to be a problem.

Lines snake around the block at stations that are actually open for business.

Hoping to shorten the wait, on Friday, officials implemented an odd-even gas rationing system in New York City and Long Island.

Those with license plates ending in odd numbers or letters can fill up on odd days of the month, while those with plates ending in even numbers could only get gas on even days of the month.

"We have to do something," New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said. "This is practical and enforceable and a lot better than doing nothing."

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie implemented a rationing system and has said that the new rules have curbed lines from more than three hours to under an hour.

ABC News' John Schriffen and Anthony Castellano contributed to this report

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