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Anatomy of China’s Money and Murder Scandal

Allegations of bribery, corruption, even charges of murder has one of China's most powerful families sitting on the outside of power looking in.

Bo Xilai was once a superstar in the Chinese Communist Party, but no longer. He's been under the microscope for his own abuse of power and lost his job because of it. Additionally, his wife is accused of murdering a influential English business man, and his son can't stay out of the tabloids for his partying ways.

But this is about more than a corrupt family. This scandal has rocked China's Communist Party and has pulled back the curtain on the Chinese political system, giving us a chance to take a unique glimpse into an increasingly fractured government.

Joining us to discuss China's public relations nightmare is Richard McGregor, Washington Bureau Chief for the Financial Times.

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