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While Tunisia and Egypt saw their heads of state overthrown, the uprising in Libya was the only true, and full revolution.  Muammar Ghaddafi ran the country like a family mafia and when he was overthrown the Libyan people were left without any government or structure to build from.

The evidence of that can be seen today throughout the country where there is no functioning justice system, no army, and piles of trash are building up because there isn't a government to provide basic public needs.

Even though the National Transition Council is recognized internationally as Libya's acting representative, the power is really spread out among the countries many tribal militias who act at regional police.

To discuss Libya and the struggle they're going through to start over, Christiane Amanpour sits down with author Lindsey Hilsum whose new book Sandstorm: Libya in the Time of Revolution, is a firsthand account of the Libyan revolution.

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  • Federer stuns Djokovic in Dubai
    Federer stuns Djokovic in Dubai

    Roger Federer claimed the 84th title of his legendary career, kept his nose in front in his personal rivalry with Novak Djokovic, and equalled his best achievement at any tournament by winning the Dubai Open for the seventh time on Saturday. He had to be pleased with what he had done, he reckoned, even if it was the first time that he had lost in his five finals here.

  • Sri Lanka hammer England as Pakistan falter at ICC World Cup
    Sri Lanka hammer England as Pakistan falter at ICC World Cup

    England's hopes of reaching the quarter-finals were left hanging by a thread as Sri Lanka inflicted their third crushing defeat of the World Cup on Sunday, while Pakistan began a salvage operation with a tense 20-run win over Zimbabwe. Sri Lanka cruised to a seemingly stiff target of 310 for the loss of just one wicket with 16 balls to spare as Lahiru Thirimanne (139 not out), and Kumar Sangakkara (117 not out) shared an unbroken second-wicket partnership of 212 in Wellington. Yet Sangakkara insisted he still planned to retire from white-ball cricket after the World Cup as he was "getting old". "Everything I tried came off," he said after a win that left 1996 champions Sri Lanka, losing finalists at the last two World Cups, on course for the last eight.

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