Around the World

‘Hell and Back Again’ in Afghanistan

Staring a decade of war in Afghanistan direct in the face, we look back at what has been lost and what has been gained from Operation Enduring Freedom.

It will be decades from now before we can look back at the war in Afghanistan with the necessary perspective to decide whether it was worth the cost, both in life and resources.  But after 10 years it's important to reflect back on a decade that has been defined by America's excruciating battle against terrorism.

In a Pew research poll released this week, we found out that a third of American veterans who served after 9/11 believe the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were not worth fighting.  A reality made tougher to swallow with 1,685 troops killed and another 14,342 wounded.

For more, tune in to Around the World, where I  interview filmmaker Danfung Dennis, whose award winning documentary film "To Hell and Back" takes an intimate look at the price soldiers pay both in battle and at home in the service of their country.

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