Around the World

Will World’s Hunger for Sushi Cause Tuna Extinction?

It's no secret that Americans loves sushi. What used to be a delicacy savored on special occasions has become a new kind of fast food, available in cafeterias and grocery stores, even baseball stadiums. Our fear of eating raw fish has fully subsided and we now consume so much fish that if we're not careful we may soon run out.

Sushi: The Global Catch, a new film from documentarian Mark Hall takes an in depth look at how the growth of the international sushi industry, which exploded in America in the 1980's, has lead to a dramatic depletion of our oceans fish supply. Hall was inspired to make the film when he witnessed the popularity of Sushi in Eastern Europe during a trip to Warsaw, Poland, and was amazed at how fast sushi's popularity has spread.

Hall interviews sushi chefs from around the world, as well as environmental experts from Greenpeace, the Monterey Bay Aquarium and the Center for the Future of the Oceans to sketch out the dangerous impact to our oceans when sushi becomes an everyday food choice, "to such a degree that it has the potential to severely impact the ecological balance of the world's oceans leading to a collapse of all fish species."

The greatest fear is that wild caught fish will be completely replaced by farm raised harvested fish, which has already begun with low end sushi. To find out which fishes are most and least sustainable you can download the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch pocket guide at montereybayaquarium.org.

Loading...
  • New England raking in millions from leaf peepers
    New England raking in millions from leaf peepers

    JAFFREY, N.H. (AP) — On Mount Monadnock, hikers file up the 3,165-foot peak in lockstep, protected from drizzling rain by a luminous golden canopy of leaves. They're not just gazing at foliage — they're looking at cold, hard cash.

  • Submarine hunt sends Cold War chill across Baltic
    Submarine hunt sends Cold War chill across Baltic

    STOCKHOLM (AP) — Sweden's biggest submarine hunt since the dying days of the Soviet Union has put countries around the Baltic Sea on edge.

  • On the road to find the world's funniest person
    On the road to find the world's funniest person

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — It was last summer and Israeli-Palestinian tensions were at the highest they'd been in some time when Jamie Masada hit on a formula for world peace: Forget about guns and bombs, and just tell jokes to each other.

  • Oscar Pistorius starts serving 5 year prison term
    Oscar Pistorius starts serving 5 year prison term

    PRETORIA, South Africa (AP) — Oscar Pistorius was taken away in a police van Tuesday to start serving a five-year prison sentence for killing girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp.

  • Malaysia Islamic authorities probe 'dog patting' event
    Malaysia Islamic authorities probe 'dog patting' event

    Kuala Lumpur (AFP) - Islamic authorities in Malaysia are conducting a probe into a controversial "dog patting" event aimed at removing the stigma regarding men's best friend in the multi-ethnic Muslim-majority country.

  • NBC's Snyderman faces credibility issues
    NBC's Snyderman faces credibility issues

    NEW YORK (AP) — The quarantine against possible Ebola exposure ends this week for Dr. Nancy Snyderman, but the troubles clearly aren't over for NBC News' chief medical editor.

  • Japan's justice minister undone by cheap paper fan
    Japan's justice minister undone by cheap paper fan

    TOKYO (AP) — In the heat of summer, they are ubiquitous in Japan: cheap paper fans, advertising this or that company or product, handed out at outdoor events or busy train stations. On Monday, they brought down a politician.

  • Police say they might have spotted ambush suspect
    Police say they might have spotted ambush suspect

    Police shifted their search and a northeastern Pennsylvania school district tightened security amid another reported sighting Monday of the suspect in a deadly state police ambush.

Loading...