The Cutline
  • An Iranian rapper who lives in Germany says he has received death threats for a song that criticizes Iranian society and, some say, an Islamic Shiite imam.

    Shahin Najafi, who sings in Farsi, has faced a backlash since posting online the song, "Naghi," earlier this month.

    One website is offering a $100,000 reward for his killing. Iran's official news agency called the song an "affront" against the imam.

    "Following the affront by rap singer Shahin Najafi against Imam Hadi (7th Imam of Shias) in a song called 'Naghi,' his apostasy sentence has been issued by Ayatollah Safi Golpayegani," the Fars News Agency said in a statement translated by CNN. "If the song contains any insults or indecency towards Imam Naghi, then it is blasphemy, and God knows what to do."

    The 92-year-old Golpayegani, CNN noted, is "the highest-ranking authority in Shiite Islam after prophets and imams." And an "apostate," or someone who forsakes Islam, is "punishable by death under Iranian law."

    Najafi has dismissed

    Read More »from Iranian rapper receives death threats over song
  • Matthews, O'Leary and Gibbs (Jeopardy/Getty)

    Chris Matthews appeared on Monday's "Jeopardy!" alongside CNN's Lizzie O'Leary and former White House press secretary Robert Gibbs in a special "Power Players" edition of the game show, taped last weekend in Washington.

    And the host of MSNBC's "Hardball," to put it politely, bombed.

    Problems started for Matthews when he requested a category in the form of a question.

    "Let's go back to, what is 'Crossword Clues E?'" Matthews said. "I mean, I'm sorry, let's go $200 for the category 'Crossword Clues E.'"

    For the answer "Full name of the U-2 pilot shot down over the Soviet Union in 1960," Matthews responded, "Who is Gary Powers?" The correct response was "Who is Francis Gary Powers?"

    "We need the full name," host Alex Trebek told Matthews.

    "Who is Gary Powers?" Matthews said, repeating himself.

    "No," Trebek said to audience laughter.

    Later, after Trebek said, "A U.S.D.C. is one of these, charged with the jurisdiction of a specific region," Matthews responded, "What is a U.S. attorney?"

    The correct answer was "What is a district court?"

    "In 1986, the Supreme Court ruled that the 'hostile environment' type of this can be sex discrimination."

    Matthews responded, "What is a hostile workplace?" The correct answer was "What is sexual harrassment?"

    In the category "6-Letter World Capitals," the clue was "St. Basil's Cathedral is there." Matthews responded: "What is Istanbul?"

    The correct answer: "What is Moscow?"

    Read More »from Chris Matthews bombs on ‘Jeopardy!’
  • Murdoch and Brooks in London on July 10, 2011. (AP)

    Rebekah Brooks, former chief executive of News International and ex-editor of News of the World, has been charged with obstruction of justice in the U.K. phone-hacking investigation.

    Brooks will be charged with three counts of "conspiracy to pervert the course of justice." Her husband, Charlie, will be charged with two. Four others—her personal assistant, her driver, her personal security guard and the former head of security of News International—will also face charges, the Crown Prosecution Service announced.

    The charges carry a maximum sentence of life in prison, the CPS said.

    They are the first people charged in the phone-hacking scandal since investigators began their probe last summer.

    The charges stem from their alleged attempts to conceal evidence last July during the police investigation into phone hacking at News International. Prosecutors say Brooks and her husband tried to dispose of a laptop and several boxes of documents related to the case. Brooks and her assistant, Cheryl Carter, are also accused of removing seven boxes of material from the archives of News International.

    "We deplore this weak and unjust decision after the further unprecedented posturing of the [prosecutors]," Brooks' spokesman David Wilson said in a statement. "We will respond later today after our return from the police station."

    Brooks, a favorite of News Corp. chief Rupert Murdoch, resigned in the wake of the phone-hacking allegations against News International. She was questioned and arrested by police last July and arrested again in March, but had not been charged until Tuesday.

    Read More »from Rebekah Brooks charged in phone-hacking case

Pagination

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  • 10 Things to Know for Today
    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

  • Bad weather seen as probable cause of fatal Air Algerie crash
    Bad weather seen as probable cause of fatal Air Algerie crash

    By Chine Labbé and Mathieu Bonkougou PARIS/OUAGADOUGOU (Reuters) - Poor weather was the most likely cause of the crash of an Air Algerie flight in the West African state of Mali that killed 118 people on board, French officials said on Friday. Investigators at the scene of the crash in northern Mali concluded the airliner broke apart when it hit the ground, the officials said, suggesting this meant it was unlikely to have been the victim of an attack. Sadly, there are no survivors," French President Francois Hollande told reporters. A column of 100 soldiers and 30 vehicles from the French force stationed in the region arrived early on Friday morning to secure the crash site near the northern Mali town of Gossi and to recover bodies, a Defense Ministry official said.

  • Earth survived near-miss from 2012 solar storm: NASA
    Earth survived near-miss from 2012 solar storm: NASA

    Back in 2012, the Sun erupted with a powerful solar storm that just missed the Earth but was big enough to "knock modern civilization back to the 18th century," NASA said. The extreme space weather that tore through Earth's orbit on July 23, 2012, was the most powerful in 150 years, according to a statement posted on the US space agency website Wednesday. "If the eruption had occurred only one week earlier, Earth would have been in the line of fire," said Daniel Baker, professor of atmospheric and space physics at the University of Colorado. Instead the storm cloud hit the STEREO-A spacecraft, a solar observatory that is "almost ideally equipped to measure the parameters of such an event," NASA said.

  • Tech, Regionals… and Europe? 3 sectors to own now
    Tech, Regionals… and Europe? 3 sectors to own now

    Peter Kenny of the Clearpool Group gives us his 3 safest sector picks

  • Wheelchair-Bound Justin Bieber Cut All the Lines at Disneyland
    Wheelchair-Bound Justin Bieber Cut All the Lines at Disneyland

    Today in celebrity gossip: Justin Bieber experiences Disneyland the best way he knew how, Ariana Grande hides her grandfather's death from her Big Brother contestant brother, and Naya Rivera went and got married. Nobody can dispute that Justin Bieber is the coolest, toughest, hardest, most bad-ass celebrity alive. Heck, Justin Bieber's so hardcore that he doesn't even have to break 20 M.P.H. in his rented Lambo to get pulled over for speeding. TMZ reports that on Sunday Bieber was spotted around Disneyland taking pictures with fans while seated in a borrowed wheelchair in which he was pushed around by handlers.

  • British royal childhood memories go on show
    British royal childhood memories go on show

    A special exhibition on childhood in the British royal family is to open at Buckingham Palace on Saturday, featuring well-loved toys spanning 250 years including a gadget-laden miniature James Bond supercar. The Royal Childhood exhibition at the London palace features more than 150 objects, including cherished outfits, family photographs and private film footage. "It gives an unprecedented glimpse into life as a young member of the royal family over 250 years," said the Royal Collection Trust. The display includes many previously unseen objects and films, offering a glimpse of generations of royal children enjoying unguarded, private moments.

  • Wyoming cave with fossil secrets to be excavated
    Wyoming cave with fossil secrets to be excavated

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — For the first time in three decades, scientists are about to revisit one of North America's most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: the bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at least 30 feet deep at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave.

  • 'Free money' bank offers may cost more than you think
    'Free money' bank offers may cost more than you think

    A new analysis by GoBankingRates.com found that more than a dozen of the top 50 U.S. banks are offering free cash bonuses in an effort to attract new customers.

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