The Envoy
  • russianscientistRussia's state atomic energy corporation has announced that five of the 45 passengers killed aboard a flight that crashed in northwestern Russia Monday worked for its subsidiaries. Israeli newspapers have further identified those scientists as contractors who had worked on Iran's Bushehr nuclear energy facility.

    "The State Atomic Energy Corporation ROSATOM and our subsidiaries had suffered a great loss," the Russian agency said on its website Wedneesday. "Five senior staff from three of our subsidiary enterprises were among the 45 people who died in a plane crash in Russia's north-western republic of Karelia on 20 June.

    The RusAir Tupelev-134 passenger jet, which took off from Moscow's Domodedova airport, crashed on approach to the Petrozavodsk airport late Monday, killing 45 of the 53 passengers and crew members aboard.

    Among the dead were the following scientists employed at Rosatom subsidiaries: Sergey Ryzhov, director and general designer of OKB Gidropress; Banyuk Gennady Fedorovich, deputy director and chief designer of OKB Gidropress; Nikolai Trunov, head of department and chief designer of OKB Gidropress; Andrei Trofimov, chief technologist of OKBM Afrikantov;  and Valery Lyalin, head of the technology department of AtomEnergoMash.

    "The five nuclear experts killed in a plane crash in northern Russia earlier this week had assisted in the design of an Iranian atomic facility," Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported Thursday, citing security sources in Russia.

    Read More »from Russian nuclear scientists working on Iran’s Bushehr reactor among plane crash victims
  • President Barack Obama won strong support for his plan to withdraw 33,000 of the 100,000 U.S. troops serving in Afghanistan by next summer from one key figure today: Hamid Karzai.

    It was a rare nod from the Afghan president, with whom the U.S. has often had tense relations.

    "The number of troops that he has announced to be withdrawn is a sign that Afghanistan is taking over its own security and is trying to defend it territory by its own means," Karzai told CNN's Fareed Zakaria today in response to the plan Obama laid out in a televised speech last night (the full interview airs Sunday). "So we are happy about the announcement."

    Karzai's endorsement came as Obama's national security team headed to Capitol Hill to brief lawmakers on what the surge withdrawal timetable would mean for achieving U.S. goals in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

    The top U.S. military officer, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Adm. Mike Mullen, acknowledged to lawmakers that in recent days he'd judged the aggressive surge withdrawal option, as announced by Obama last night, too risky. But Mullen said he has since become more comfortable with the plan.

    Read More »from Karzai embraces Obama surge withdrawal plan as Obama aides hit Capitol Hill
  • President Barack Obama, in a widely anticipated speech tonight, announced a brisk drawdown of 33,000 U.S. forces from Afghanistan by the end of next summer, and called more broadly for the U.S. to assume a more pragmatic approach to international interventions in order to focus on economic recovery and nation-building at home.

    "We are a nation whose strength abroad has been anchored in opportunity for our citizens at home," Obama said in the brief twelve minute speech from the White House East Room. "Over the last decade, we have spent a trillion dollars on war, at a time of rising debt and hard economic times. Now, we must invest in America's greatest resource — our people."

    "America, it is time to focus on nation building here at home," he said.

    The United States had achieved significant progress in the counterterrorism goals Obama outlined when he ordered the surge of U.S. forces to Afghanistan in a speech at West Point in December 2009, he said. Among those goals: reversing Taliban gains in Afghanistan, degrading Al Qaeda's capabilities and eliminating several of its commanders in Pakistan, and building up the Afghan security forces to eventually be able to secure their own country.

    But responding to growing American public impatience with the almost ten year old war and the continued economic crisis in the United States, Obama said the United States has to be strategic about pursuing national security engagements abroad.


    Read More »from Obama, ordering drawdown of surged U.S. forces in Afghanistan, urges nationbuilding at home

Pagination

(679 Stories)
  • Why are Americans obsessed with missing plane?
    Why are Americans obsessed with missing plane?

    PERTH, Australia (AP) — From the disappearances of aviator Amelia Earhart to labor union leader Jimmy Hoffa, there's just something about a good mystery that Americans find too tantalizing to resist. Perhaps that's why the saga of missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has continued to rivet the country long after people elsewhere have moved on.

  • Study: Fuels from corn waste not better than gas
    Study: Fuels from corn waste not better than gas

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Biofuels made from the leftovers of harvested corn plants are worse than gasoline for global warming in the short term, a study shows, challenging the Obama administration's conclusions that they are a much cleaner oil alternative and will help combat climate change.

  • Teen OK after riding in wheel well of Hawaii jet
    Teen OK after riding in wheel well of Hawaii jet

    HONOLULU (AP) — Officials say a 16-year-old boy is "lucky to be alive" and unharmed after flying from California to Hawaii stowed away in a plane's wheel well, surviving cold temperatures at 38,000 feet and a lack of oxygen.

  • After bombs, Boston Marathon under tight security
    After bombs, Boston Marathon under tight security

    BOSTON (AP) — A large police presence greeted runners and spectators filtering in Monday morning for the Boston Marathon, a year after a pair of homemade pressure-cooker bombs near the finish line killed three people and wounded more than 260 others.

  • Parents: 234 girls kidnapped from Nigeria school
    Parents: 234 girls kidnapped from Nigeria school

    CHIBOK, Nigeria (AP) — Some 234 girls are missing from the northeast Nigerian school attacked last week by Islamic extremists, significantly more than the 85 reported by education officials, parents told the state governor Monday.

  • Australia sees 'regroup' on Malaysian plane search in a few days
    Australia sees 'regroup' on Malaysian plane search in a few days

    By David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Australia will decide in a few days whether to alter or scale back the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, but will consult all countries involved on any changes, Australia's ambassador to the United States said on Sunday. Kim Beazley told CNN the search countries would "regroup and reconsider" if nothing is found in a section of the Indian Ocean floor now being scanned by a U.S. Navy underwater drone. This includes adjustments to the air and sea surface search efforts and the possibility of bringing in private contractors to replace some military assets, he said. You may well also consider bringing in other underwater search equipment," Beazley said on the "State of the Union with Candy Crowley" program.

  • 16-year-old survives in wheel well of Maui flight
    16-year-old survives in wheel well of Maui flight

    HONOLULU (AP) — Officials say a 16-year-old boy is "lucky to be alive" and unharmed after flying from California to Hawaii stowed away in a plane's wheel well, surviving cold temperatures at 38,000 feet and a lack of oxygen.

  • Japan PM makes offering to Yasukuni Shrine, angers China, South Korea

    By Elaine Lies TOKYO (Reuters) - Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has sent a ritual offering to the Yasukuni Shrine, seen by critics as a symbol of Japan's past militarism, angering both South Korea and China on Monday and putting regional ties under further strain. Adding to unease in the region, a Chinese maritime court in Shanghai seized a ship on Saturday owned by Japanese shipping firm Mitsui O.S.K. Lines, a move that Japan warned could have an adverse impact on its businesses in China. China's Foreign Ministry said the disagreement was a normal commercial dispute. Japan said the ship seizure, apparently the first time the assets of a Japanese company have been seized in a lawsuit concerning compensation for World War Two, was "extremely regrettable".

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