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  • Nasdaq stocks posting largest percentage decreases

    A look at the 10 biggest percentage decliners on Nasdaq at the close of trading: Galectin Therapeutics Inc. fell 60.8 percent to $5.70. Alliance Fiber Optic Products Inc. fell 20.6 percent to $13.17. Impax ...

  • First Glimpse of Higgs Bosons at Work Revealed

    An extremely rare collision of massive subatomic particles could reveal the nuts and bolts of how the subatomic particles called Higgs bosons impart mass to other particles. The data comes from the ATLAS experiment, the same proton-collision experiment that revealed the Higgs boson, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a 17-mille-long (27 kilometers) underground atom smasher on the border of Switzerland and France. By studying how much the Higgs sticks to the W-bosons during this scattering process, the team could learn new details about how strongly the elusive Higgs boson interacts with the field that gives all particles their mass. "We are basically observing the Higgs boson at work to see whether it does its job the way we expect it to," said study co-author Marc-André Pleier, a physicist with the ATLAS project, and a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York.

  • Inside North Korea's Summer Camp for Kids
    Inside North Korea's Summer Camp for Kids

    Gorgeous Beaches, Water Slides and Statues of Dictators

  • Analysis: Hamilton's statement means it's each man for himself

    By Alan Baldwin LONDON (Reuters) - Lewis Hamilton made a mistake in Sunday's Hungarian Grand Prix and it almost cost him dear. It would also have been costly had he carried out instructions over the radio two thirds of the way through the race not to hold up German team mate and championship leader Nico Rosberg. Hamilton knew it and, ultimately, the team recognized it too.

  • In Iraq's Mosul, radicals unleash their vision
    In Iraq's Mosul, radicals unleash their vision

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Residents of Mosul have watched helplessly as extremists ruling the northern Iraqi city blew up some of their most beloved landmarks and shrines to impose a stark vision of Islam. Next up for destruction, they feared: the Crooked Minaret, a more than 840-year-old tower that leans like Italy's Tower of Pisa.

  • Origins of Mysterious World Trade Center Ship Revealed
    Origins of Mysterious World Trade Center Ship Revealed

    In July 2010, amid the gargantuan rebuilding effort at the site of the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, construction workers halted the backhoes when they uncovered something unexpected just south of where the Twin Towers once stood. Now, a new report finds that tree rings in those waterlogged ribs show the vessel was likely built in 1773, or soon after, in a small shipyard near Philadelphia. What's more, the ship was perhaps made from the same kind of white oak trees used to build parts of Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and U.S. Constitution were signed, according to the study published this month in the journal Tree-Ring Research. Archaeologists had been on-site throughout the excavation of the World Trade Center's Vehicular Security Center.

  • Chinese officials cut corners with rectangular running track
    Chinese officials cut corners with rectangular running track

    Chinese officials painted a rectangular running track at a stadium as they rushed preparations for a visit by their superiors, state media reported Tuesday. "Leaders, this is the newly developed right-angled running track," wrote one poster on China's Twitter-like Sina Weibo, imitating the tone of a lower-ranking Chinese official reporting to his superior. "We have become the first country in the world to have such tracks! I believe (Chinese athletes) will outperform other countries' (athletes) after scientific training on such a running track!" China National Radio described the forestry administration stadium in Tonghe county, in the northeastern province of Heilongjiang, as having "rectangular tracks" around the football pitch.

  • The Army’s New Handgun: A Weapon for Criminals?
    The Army’s New Handgun: A Weapon for Criminals?

    There’s a new semi-automatic handgun on the horizon for the Army that U.S. consumers may have access to almost immediately. The goal is to develop something far more advanced and powerful than the Cold-War era Beretta M9, which the Army has been using for nearly three decades. Since the Army is “the lead agent for small arms,” whatever weapon is produced would also have to meet “the needs of the other services,” reports Military.com. “The Army is seeking to replace the M9 and M11 pistols with a handgun that is more accurate, ergonomic, reliable and durable than the current pistol.”

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