The Lookout
  • Michael Patterson (photo: Facebook)Michael Patterson (Facebook)

    Michael Patterson, the 43-year-old Georgia man who dived into a creek to save a 4-year-old girl from drowning and became paralyzed from the chest down during the rescue, died after spending three weeks in a hospital, The Associated Press reports.

    Patterson's family shared the news on Facebook.

    Patterson's bravery left many, including the woman whose daughter he rescued, stunned. "He jumped in head first and after I grabbed her, I looked back and he was floating on top of the water," Carlissa Jones told WSB-TV.com after Patterson's injury, which occurred on June 8.

    Jones' daughter, Javea, was able to be resuscitated. Patterson broke his neck during the dive. He also developed respiratory acidosis, pneumonia and a bacterial infection after the injury, according to Fox News. The medical problems that came after the broken neck contributed to his death, Polk County Coroner Trey Litesey told news outlets.

    Patterson's bravery was commended across the Web. Comments on the Yahoo News story

    Read More »from Man who became paralyzed after saving drowning girl dies at 43
  • Lives with GEDs buck stereotypes

    Todd Jacondino (Photo courtesy of Todd Jacondino)

    Among the quirkier, but probably meaningless, details in the story of Edward Snowden—the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked U.S. government spy secrets, abandoned his girlfriend in Hawaii, bolted for Hong Kong and has since holed up in Moscow—is this figure: $120,000.

    One-hundred-and-twenty grand is what the 29-year-old high school dropout earned while working for Booz Allen Hamilton, an NSA contractor. Before a brief stint in the U.S. Army and several government jobs, Snowden earned his GED, which raises this question: How far can one go in life with a GED? Yahoo News asked readers for their stories of earning a General Educational Development diploma, and while none boasted as sexy an existence as a fugitive with a pole-dancing girlfriend and a six-figure salary, their insights and stories say much about how GEDs can alter a life.

    A lesson learned late: School first, fun later

    Todd Jacondino dropped out of Thomas Edison High School in Jamaica, Queens, when he was

    Read More »from Lives with GEDs buck stereotypes
  • New Yorker cover featuring Bert and Ernie (art: Jack Hunter)New Yorker cover featuring Bert and Ernie (art: Jack Hunter)

    The Supreme Court's decision to overturn the Defense of Marriage Act has resulted in one of the New Yorker's more memorable covers.

    On it, Sesame Street residents Bert and Ernie cuddle on the couch while watching the announcement on television.

    Of course, the rumors of Bert and Ernie being more than roommates is nothing new (more on that later). But neither, it seems, is the artwork on the New Yorker's cover.

    The magazine acknowledged that the drawing was first uploaded to the Web over a year ago by artist Jack Hunter. Hunter posted the artwork on a Tumblr blog in May 2012. Gawker has the two pieces of art, side by side.

    The main difference between the original work and the one on the New Yorker is what Bert and Ernie are watching on TV. In the original piece, the pals are watching President Barack Obama (May 2012 was when Obama announced that he was in support of same-sex marriage).

    But why are Bert and Ernie still being used as symbols of the gay rights movement?

    Slate.com's June

    Read More »from New Yorker’s ‘Sesame Street’ cover draws mixed reactions

Pagination

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  • Today in History

    Today is Thursday, July 24, the 205th day of 2014. There are 160 days left in the year.

  • Tyrannosaur 'Gangs' Terrorized Ancient Landscape
    Tyrannosaur 'Gangs' Terrorized Ancient Landscape

    Some 70 million years ago, three tyrannosaurs stalked together across a mud flat in Canada, possibly searching for prey. The new insight comes from several parallel tyrannosaur tracks unearthed in Canada. The ferocious beasts may have "stuck together as a pack to increase their chances of bringing down prey and individually surviving," said study co-author Richard McCrea, a curator at the Peace Region Palaeontology Center in Canada. Tyrannosaur hunting

  • Forget Facebook, Caterpillar says a lot more about the 'recovery'

    The 62-session streak without a 1% move on the S&P ended last week, but the much more significant stretch of 33 months without a 10% correction is still firmly entrenched. And when a company like Facebook ...

  • House panel clears way for vote on Obama lawsuit
    House panel clears way for vote on Obama lawsuit

    Over Democratic objections, Republicans cleared the way Thursday for a House vote on legislation authorizing an election-year lawsuit accusing President Barack Obama of failing to implement the 4-year-old health care law as it was written.

  • Wyoming cave with fossil secrets to be excavated
    Wyoming cave with fossil secrets to be excavated

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — For the first time in three decades, scientists are about to revisit one of North America's most remarkable troves of ancient fossils: the bones of tens of thousands of animals piled at least 30 feet deep at the bottom of a sinkhole-type cave.

  • GUEST HOWLS OVER DOG'S ATTENDANCE AT WEDDING

    DEAR ABBY: Is it acceptable to bring a teacup-sized dog to a wedding? The excuse was, "Well, the wedding was at the beach." The pre-dinner and dancing were inside a high-end resort on the beach. The dog was taken inside these establishments. After a guest -- a family member of the dog's owner -- asked the owner to remove the animal because the occasion was not about her and her dog but the bride and groom's day, the owner put the dog in a carrying case and the dog returned to the wedding for the rest of the night. ...

  • Cruise passengers recount horror stories to Senate

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Laurie Dishman told senators through tears that she was choked and raped on a Royal Caribbean cruise by one of the line's employees, using her experience to shed light on the dangers that passengers might face on cruises.

  • Exclusive: Ukraine rebel commander acknowledges fighters had BUK missile
    Exclusive: Ukraine rebel commander acknowledges fighters had BUK missile

    By Anton Zverev DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) - A powerful Ukrainian rebel leader has confirmed that pro-Russian separatists had an anti-aircraft missile of the type Washington says was used to shoot down Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 and it could have originated in Russia. In an interview with Reuters, Alexander Khodakovsky, commander of the Vostok Battalion, acknowledged for the first time since the airliner was brought down in eastern Ukraine on Thursday that the rebels did possess the BUK missile system and said it could have been sent back subsequently to remove proof of its presence. Before the Malaysian plane was shot down, rebels had boasted of obtaining the BUK missiles, which can shoot down airliners at cruising height.

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