The Lookout
  • Michael Patterson (photo: Facebook)Michael Patterson (Facebook)

    Michael Patterson, the 43-year-old Georgia man who dived into a creek to save a 4-year-old girl from drowning and became paralyzed from the chest down during the rescue, died after spending three weeks in a hospital, The Associated Press reports.

    Patterson's family shared the news on Facebook.

    Patterson's bravery left many, including the woman whose daughter he rescued, stunned. "He jumped in head first and after I grabbed her, I looked back and he was floating on top of the water," Carlissa Jones told WSB-TV.com after Patterson's injury, which occurred on June 8.

    Jones' daughter, Javea, was able to be resuscitated. Patterson broke his neck during the dive. He also developed respiratory acidosis, pneumonia and a bacterial infection after the injury, according to Fox News. The medical problems that came after the broken neck contributed to his death, Polk County Coroner Trey Litesey told news outlets.

    Patterson's bravery was commended across the Web. Comments on the Yahoo News story

    Read More »from Man who became paralyzed after saving drowning girl dies at 43
  • Lives with GEDs buck stereotypes

    Todd Jacondino (Photo courtesy of Todd Jacondino)

    Among the quirkier, but probably meaningless, details in the story of Edward Snowden—the former National Security Agency contractor who leaked U.S. government spy secrets, abandoned his girlfriend in Hawaii, bolted for Hong Kong and has since holed up in Moscow—is this figure: $120,000.

    One-hundred-and-twenty grand is what the 29-year-old high school dropout earned while working for Booz Allen Hamilton, an NSA contractor. Before a brief stint in the U.S. Army and several government jobs, Snowden earned his GED, which raises this question: How far can one go in life with a GED? Yahoo News asked readers for their stories of earning a General Educational Development diploma, and while none boasted as sexy an existence as a fugitive with a pole-dancing girlfriend and a six-figure salary, their insights and stories say much about how GEDs can alter a life.

    A lesson learned late: School first, fun later

    Todd Jacondino dropped out of Thomas Edison High School in Jamaica, Queens, when he was

    Read More »from Lives with GEDs buck stereotypes
  • New Yorker cover featuring Bert and Ernie (art: Jack Hunter)New Yorker cover featuring Bert and Ernie (art: Jack Hunter)

    The Supreme Court's decision to overturn the Defense of Marriage Act has resulted in one of the New Yorker's more memorable covers.

    On it, Sesame Street residents Bert and Ernie cuddle on the couch while watching the announcement on television.

    Of course, the rumors of Bert and Ernie being more than roommates is nothing new (more on that later). But neither, it seems, is the artwork on the New Yorker's cover.

    The magazine acknowledged that the drawing was first uploaded to the Web over a year ago by artist Jack Hunter. Hunter posted the artwork on a Tumblr blog in May 2012. Gawker has the two pieces of art, side by side.

    The main difference between the original work and the one on the New Yorker is what Bert and Ernie are watching on TV. In the original piece, the pals are watching President Barack Obama (May 2012 was when Obama announced that he was in support of same-sex marriage).

    But why are Bert and Ernie still being used as symbols of the gay rights movement?

    Slate.com's June

    Read More »from New Yorker’s ‘Sesame Street’ cover draws mixed reactions

Pagination

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  • Putin Writes Off $32 Billion of Cuba's Debts to Russia
    Putin Writes Off $32 Billion of Cuba's Debts to Russia

    Russian President Vladimir Putin is currently on a grand tour of Latin America. His first stop is in Havana, Cuba. Ahead of arriving in Cuba, Putin decided to bestow a gift upon the Cuban government. The first payment is due in October, and will be made from the National Bank of Cuba to the Russian lender Vnesheconombank.

  • Israel-NYC flight makes safe emergency landing
    Israel-NYC flight makes safe emergency landing

    NEW YORK (AP) — A New York-bound Delta Air Lines flight from Israel declared an emergency and returned to Tel Aviv early Sunday after developing a mechanical problem, vexing passengers already on edge as Palestinian militants launched rocket attacks on the city.

  • The Awful Reason Florida Is Bulldozing One of the World’s Rarest Forests

    The lush tropical canopies of pine rocklands exist only in South Florida, Cuba, and the Bahamas. This month the University of Miami sold 88 acres of rockland to Ram, a Palm Beach County–based developer known for building strip malls and residential complexes. The Miami Herald reports that the company has allotted space for 900 apartments and 185,000 square feet for a Walmart, in addition to a Chick-fil-A, a Chili’s, and a fitness center. This is how,” Dennis Olle, a lawyer and a board member of Tropical Audubon and the North American Butterfly Association, told The Miami Herald.

  • Owners of Trump Plaza casino expect it will close
    Owners of Trump Plaza casino expect it will close

    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Atlantic City's crumbling casino market disintegrated even further Saturday as the owners of the Trump Plaza casino said they expect to shut down in mid-September.

  • Britain bars Russian delegation from Farnborough air show
    Britain bars Russian delegation from Farnborough air show

    Britain said Saturday it had barred a Russian delegation from attending the Farnborough air show because of the Ukraine crisis, sparking an angry reaction from Russia. The Russian embassy in London expressed "regret" that Britain had not issued visas to a large part of its delegation and demanded an urgent explanation. The Farnborough International Airshow (FIA) is a key event in the aviation sector calendar, with Russia usually sending a sizeable contingent as it seeks foreign sales. Britain has been a strong backer of EU asset bans and travel freezes against Moscow over what it says is Russian interference in conflict-torn eastern Ukraine.

  • After car stalls, driver finds giant snake under the hood
    After car stalls, driver finds giant snake under the hood

    The 9-foot python isn't considered dangerous but still provided a healthy scare for the driver and a local man who stopped to help.

  • More than 20 awesome iPhone tricks you’ve probably never heard of
    More than 20 awesome iPhone tricks you’ve probably never heard of

    If there’s one thing you can always teach an old iPhone user, it’s new tricks. And thankfully, both CNET and Wiki Pac have both just put together big lists of some awesome iPhone tricks and features that you may not even realize exist. While we’re sure there are some iPhone junkies out there who know about all these features, both lists cover such a wide list of tricks that there’s likely something new in here for everyone. Among the highlights are the ability to undo what you just typed just by giving your iPhone a quick shake; how to close up to three apps at the same time by swiping up on your device with three fingers; how to teach

  • South African salvage master to refloat Costa Concordia
    South African salvage master to refloat Costa Concordia

    After rescuing a burning ship from pirate-infested waters off Yemen and a sinking oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico, South African salvage master Nick Sloane faces his biggest test yet off an idyllic Mediterranean island. The 52-year-old says the attempt to float the Costa Concordia cruise ship, due to begin on Monday, is his "most challenging" yet in a career that has taken him to six continents and two warzones. He has led an international operation with hundreds of salvage workers including divers, welders and engineers operating 24 hours a day around the rusting 290-metre (951-foot) hulk, which is bigger than the Titanic. "By the end of July, the Costa Concordia is gone from Giglio," Sloane said in one of his video updates for the operation's website -- theparbucklingproject.com.

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