The Lookout
  • SANFORD, Fla.—The photos were as unforgettable as they were haunting: Trayvon Martin’s dead body, sprawled out in wet grass; the 17-year-old’s Nike shirt, pierced with a bullet hole; his limp wrist; his chest; and his face, slack.

    The second day of the murder trial of George Zimmerman brought forth those photos and other powerful pieces of evidence, including the clothes Zimmerman was wearing and the gun he carried on the night he fatally shot Martin in February 2012. There was also a display of the now-iconic hoodie Martin wore on the night he died.

    Zimmerman looked at the images without a strong reaction, though with more focus than he showed during opening arguments. Martin’s parents turned away, looked down and eventually left the courtroom as the photos of their son were shown to the jury.

    The litany of graphic evidence, paired with the testimony of the Sanford police officer who described his efforts to save Martin, brought the trial to an early emotional crescendo. The 14-year

    Read More »from Haunting photos and unexpected support for defense on Day 2 of Zimmerman trial
  • Hearing his doctor utter the "o" word pushed Steven Bryan to shed weight.

    At 6 feet and 287 pounds, he was morbidly obese, his doctor warned him in November 2011. That news forced the 50-year-old Anaheim, Calif., resident to re-examine his habits. He made some changes, dropped below 250 and now hovers around 257. His body mass index, however, is 34.9, which, according to the medical establishment, still makes him obese.

    “I'm fat, and it's my fault,” Bryan says.

    It’s no surprise, then, that he criticizes last week’s decision by the American Medical Association to classify obesity as a disease. Some experts say the decision increases the chance that doctors and insurance companies could more effectively treat the 78 million adults and 12 million children in the United States with BMIs above 30.

    Steven Bryan (Photo courtesy of Steven Bryan)

    To Bryan, that wrongly fashions the medical establishment as a crutch—one with more meds and more billings for more doctor appointments.

    He is one of several obese Americans who wrote this week

    Read More »from ‘I’m fat, and it’s my fault’—and other reactions to calling obesity a disease
  • SANFORD, Fla.—One of the most anticipated murder trials in recent memory began with a torrent of profanity from the prosecution and a knock-knock joke from the defense.

    The state of Florida’s case against George Zimmerman began on Monday with the expected debate about whether the man who shot and fatally wounded 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in February 2012 committed murder or acted in self-defense. What was not expected was a bit of forced humor, which fell jarringly flat.

    The lead defense attorney, Don West, declared early in his remarks that “sometimes you have to laugh to keep from crying” and then ventured a joke. He confessed it was “a little bit weird” to do so and asked the jury to avoid holding the joke against the defendant.

    Then he went ahead.

    “Knock, knock,” West said, stunning both the jury and the assembled onlookers.

    “Who’s there?” he answered himself.

    “George Zimmerman.”

    “George Zimmerman who?”

    “All right. Good. You're on the jury.”

    There was barely a reaction.

    Read More »from Profanity, theatrics and a joke on Day 1 of George Zimmerman’s murder trial

Pagination

(3,631 Stories)
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