The Lookout
  • SANFORD, Fla.—The photos were as unforgettable as they were haunting: Trayvon Martin’s dead body, sprawled out in wet grass; the 17-year-old’s Nike shirt, pierced with a bullet hole; his limp wrist; his chest; and his face, slack.

    The second day of the murder trial of George Zimmerman brought forth those photos and other powerful pieces of evidence, including the clothes Zimmerman was wearing and the gun he carried on the night he fatally shot Martin in February 2012. There was also a display of the now-iconic hoodie Martin wore on the night he died.

    Zimmerman looked at the images without a strong reaction, though with more focus than he showed during opening arguments. Martin’s parents turned away, looked down and eventually left the courtroom as the photos of their son were shown to the jury.

    The litany of graphic evidence, paired with the testimony of the Sanford police officer who described his efforts to save Martin, brought the trial to an early emotional crescendo. The 14-year

    Read More »from Haunting photos and unexpected support for defense on Day 2 of Zimmerman trial
  • Hearing his doctor utter the "o" word pushed Steven Bryan to shed weight.

    At 6 feet and 287 pounds, he was morbidly obese, his doctor warned him in November 2011. That news forced the 50-year-old Anaheim, Calif., resident to re-examine his habits. He made some changes, dropped below 250 and now hovers around 257. His body mass index, however, is 34.9, which, according to the medical establishment, still makes him obese.

    “I'm fat, and it's my fault,” Bryan says.

    It’s no surprise, then, that he criticizes last week’s decision by the American Medical Association to classify obesity as a disease. Some experts say the decision increases the chance that doctors and insurance companies could more effectively treat the 78 million adults and 12 million children in the United States with BMIs above 30.

    Steven Bryan (Photo courtesy of Steven Bryan)

    To Bryan, that wrongly fashions the medical establishment as a crutch—one with more meds and more billings for more doctor appointments.

    He is one of several obese Americans who wrote this week

    Read More »from ‘I’m fat, and it’s my fault’—and other reactions to calling obesity a disease
  • SANFORD, Fla.—One of the most anticipated murder trials in recent memory began with a torrent of profanity from the prosecution and a knock-knock joke from the defense.

    The state of Florida’s case against George Zimmerman began on Monday with the expected debate about whether the man who shot and fatally wounded 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in February 2012 committed murder or acted in self-defense. What was not expected was a bit of forced humor, which fell jarringly flat.

    The lead defense attorney, Don West, declared early in his remarks that “sometimes you have to laugh to keep from crying” and then ventured a joke. He confessed it was “a little bit weird” to do so and asked the jury to avoid holding the joke against the defendant.

    Then he went ahead.

    “Knock, knock,” West said, stunning both the jury and the assembled onlookers.

    “Who’s there?” he answered himself.

    “George Zimmerman.”

    “George Zimmerman who?”

    “All right. Good. You're on the jury.”

    There was barely a reaction.

    Read More »from Profanity, theatrics and a joke on Day 1 of George Zimmerman’s murder trial

Pagination

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  • Who is Steven Sotloff, the other U.S. journalist being held by ISIL?
    Who is Steven Sotloff, the other U.S. journalist being held by ISIL?

    The family of Steven Sotloff — believed to be the person who appears at the end of an Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant video showing the beheading of fellow American journalist James Foley — is asking the White House to do everything it can to free him.

  • Palace move on from Mackay amid FA investigation

    Preferred candidate Malky Mackay is out of the running to take charge of Crystal Palace after the English Football Association (FA) opened an investigation into the conduct of the Scot during his time at Cardiff City, British media reported. The Daily Mirror and Daily Mail both reported that the FA were looking into a series of text messages sent between Mackay and Crystal Palace director of football Iain Moody when the pair worked together at Cardiff. Moody joined Palace soon afterwards when Tony Pulis was taking over as manager of the South London club. He led them to an 11th place finish in the Premier League last term, while Cardiff were relegated.

  • A Frame by Frame Analysis of George W. Bush and the Ice Bucket
    A Frame by Frame Analysis of George W. Bush and the Ice Bucket

    George W. Bush, 43rd POTUS, biographer of 41st POTUS, and painter of Google images portraits, joined in on the Ice Bucket Challenge with a Facebook video Wednesday. Nominated by New York Jets owner Woody Johnson, pro golfer Rory McIlroy, San Francisco 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh, and daughter Jenna Bush Hager (where you at, Barbara?), Bush recorded a 48-second video to join in on the cause that's raising awareness and millions in donations for ALS research. After all, we're not getting an Obama Ice Bucket Challenge video.) Bush begins his video by rejecting the Challenge, opting instead to write a check. He's proud of his move. The billowing American flag in the background agrees.

  • Four-time champ Wozniacki ousted at Connecticut Open tennis
    Four-time champ Wozniacki ousted at Connecticut Open tennis

    Camila Giorgi sprang an upset to defeat four-time champion Caroline Wozniacki 6-4, 6-2 and reach the quarter-finals of the WTA Connecticut Open, a final warm-up for the US Open. The Italian saw off the former world number one in 78 minutes on Wednesday to book a last-eight date with Spain's Garbine Muguruza, who eliminated Chinese qualifier Peng Shuai 6-2, 3-6, 6-3 in another second-round match. The unseeded Giorgi also ousted Wozniacki in last year's US Open, but lost their only other meeting this year at Eastbourne. Wozniacki, whose best Grand Slam showing was a 2009 US Open runner-up effort, won the title at New Haven from 2008 to 2011, but saw her record at the Yale University event dip to 24-3.

  • Can the police really do that?
    Can the police really do that?

    In the days since two reporters were arrested at a Ferguson McDonald’s during fiery protests ignited after a police officer fatally shot an unarmed black 18-year-old, stunned Americans watching news coverage of officers with combat gear, rifles and tear gas have found themselves asking of police demands and restrictions: Can the cops really do that?

  • What to do if your Social Security number was stolen
    What to do if your Social Security number was stolen

    If your data was part of the recent hospital information breach, take these four steps to protect yourself.

  • Neanderthals and humans had 'ample time' to mix
    Neanderthals and humans had 'ample time' to mix

    BERLIN (AP) — Humans and Neanderthals may have coexisted in Europe for more than 5,000 years, providing ample time for the two species to meet and mix, according to new research.

  • How your boss will run your life in a few years
    How your boss will run your life in a few years

    Want job security? Let your company monitor you 24/7.

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