The Lookout
  • JFK's endangered Worldport terminal (Mary Altaffer/AP)Anthony Stramaglia has many fond memories of JFK Airport’s iconic Terminal 3. For one, it was the first place he ever got on a plane.

    “I was only 2 years old,” said Stramaglia of his first trip through Pan American World Airways’ "Jetsons"-esque structure, the Worldport. “I’m dating myself here, but it must have been 1971. I flew out with my mother on a trip to Rome, and there must have been something about the terminal that struck me, even then.”

    Stramaglia, a New Jersey resident, has thrown himself into a quixotic campaign to save the Pan Am Worldport from almost certain demolition by the New York/New Jersey Port Authority and Delta Air Lines, which now owns it. In 2011 he joined a grass-roots Save the Worldport campaign, founded by a former Pan Am employee, Kalev Savi.

    “I’m not a preservationist by trade,” said Stramaglia. “I’m an IT guy. But this is something I latched on to. I have a close emotional tie with it.”

    Opened on May 24, 1960, the Worldport conjures up images of a

    Read More »from Final push to save JFK’s endangered ‘flying saucer’ Pan Am terminal
  • James Gandolfini, who passed away on Tuesday, will long be remembered for his consummate acting chops. For wrongly convicted Marty Tankleff of Long Island, however, the "Sopranos" star left an entirely different kind of legacy.

    Years after Tankleff was convicted as a teenager for killing his parents in 1988, Gandolfini became a quiet supporter of the Long Islander as he fought for two decades to overturn the double-murder charge, the New York Daily News reports.

    “Jim was loyal—it wasn’t like he did it for the publicity,” said Tankleff, 41.

    Gandolfini learned about the case through Jay Salpeter, a former New York Police Department detective, while researching a role for the 2006 movie "Lonely Hearts." Gandolfini met Tankleff soon afterward, driving several hours upstate to see him at Great Meadow Correctional Facility.

    “He was a genuine, nice person you could sit down and eat dinner with,” said Tankleff. “He got involved with my situation when others were reluctant.”

    At the upstate facility,

    Read More »from Ex-inmate recalls Gandolfini’s support in case
  • George Zimmerman listens to a jury consultant in court this week. Opening arguments in the murder trial will be heard on Monday. (Joe Burbank/AP)

    On paper, Seminole County, Fla., criminal case No. 2012-001083-CFA is a second-degree murder trial, one that could send George Zimmerman to prison for life.

    But in the court of public opinion, the shooting death of unarmed black teenager Trayvon Martin has roused a national conversation about racial profiling, self-defense, gun control, vigilantism, civil rights and more.

    A trial that speaks to something more than just the individuals involved is good for civic discourse, says Jason Johnson, a political science and communications professor at Hiram College in Ohio.

    “That is a very good result of this case,” Johnson told Yahoo News. “Depending on your demographics and your experience, there are different parts of this case that pop out to you.”

    Opening arguments in the high-profile trial, which will be streamed live on Yahoo, begin at 9 a.m. ET Monday.

    Zimmerman was a volunteer crime watchman in his gated Sanford, Fla., community when he shot and killed Martin during a scuffle on a

    Read More »from Court of public opinion looms large in George Zimmerman murder trial

Pagination

(3,631 Stories)
  • No appetite among lawmakers or White House aides for that election-year debate
    No appetite among lawmakers or White House aides for that election-year debate

    What do Syrian President Bashar Assad and the U.S. Congress have in common? President Obama is unlikely to ask either for a formal green light to expand the American air war against the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) from Iraq into Syria.

  • How Steve Ballmer became a rookie basketball mogul
    How Steve Ballmer became a rookie basketball mogul

    Microsoft ex-CEO charmed Shelly Sterling on road to $2 billion Clippers purchase.

  • Science just gave us another great reason to legalize pot
    Science just gave us another great reason to legalize pot

    We’ve learned about a couple of good medical benefits to marijuana this year and now it seems there’s another one: Using medicinal marijuana makes it less likely that you’ll become hooked on painkillers. CNN reports that a new study published this in the JAMA Internal Medicine journal finds that states that have legalized medicinal marijuana have significantly fewer deaths from painkiller overdoses. FROM EARLIER: Could pot be good for your heart? In all, the study found that states that had legalized medical pot experienced around 1,700 fewer painkiller overdose deaths in 2010 than what would have happened if those states didn’t make medical marijuana legal and available. “We found there was about a 25% lower rate of prescription painkiller overdose deaths on

  • ISIS Demands $6.6M Ransom for 26-Year-Old American Woman
    ISIS Demands $6.6M Ransom for 26-Year-Old American Woman

    Family Says Iraqi Terror Group Threatened to Execute Aid Worker If Demands Aren’t Met

  • Poroshenko to seek ceasefire plan after 'very tough' talks with Putin
    Poroshenko to seek ceasefire plan after 'very tough' talks with Putin

    Russian President Vladimir Putin urged his Ukrainian counterpart on Tuesday not to escalate an offensive against pro-Moscow rebels, and threatened economic retaliation for signing a trade accord with the European Union. At the leaders' first meeting since June, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko replied by demanding a halt to arms shipments from Russia to the separatist fighters. The pair shook hands at the start of talks in the Belarussian capital Minsk, only hours after Kiev said it had captured Russian soldiers on a "special mission" on Ukrainian territory. Responding to a video of the detained servicemen, a Russian defense ministry source told Russian news agencies that the servicemen had crossed the border by mistake.

  • British Filmmaker: Why My Stepbrother And Others Have Become Muslim Extremists
    British Filmmaker: Why My Stepbrother And Others Have Become Muslim Extremists

    News this week of the death of Douglas McCain, an American who joined the ISIL militia and was killed in Syria, has hit close to home for Robb Leech. The British filmmaker’s stepbrother, Richard Dart, turned to Islamist extremism in 2009 and was convicted in England for plotting to commit terrorist acts in 2012, but Leech never thought of abandoning him. Instead, he turned on his cameras and delved into the militant community to learn more.

  • Iceland volcano struck by biggest earthquake yet, still no eruption

    A magnitude 5.7 earthquake hit Iceland's Bardarbunga volcano overnight, the biggest since tremors began 10 days ago, but there is still no sign of an eruption, the country's Meteorological Office said on Tuesday. Intense seismic activity at Iceland's largest volcano system has raised worries that an eruption could cause another ash cloud like that from the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in 2010 that shut down much of Europe's airspace for six days. "There was one event during the night ... it was a magnitude 5.7 (quake), the largest in this series," Palmi Erlendsson, a geologist at the Met Office said. "Activity is still deep and we see no signs of anything close to the surface." On Sunday, Iceland lowered its warning code for possible volcanic disruption to the aviation industry to orange from red, the highest level on the country's five-point alert system, after concluding that seismic activity had not led to a volcanic eruption under the glacier.

  • New York risks 'return to bad old days'
    New York risks 'return to bad old days'

    New York is hurtling back to "the bad old days of high crime" under current Mayor Bill de Blasio, a major police union has warned, drawing a sharp rebuke from the Democrat. "The degradation of our streets is on the rise," said Ed Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association, urging the Democratic Party to choose another city to hold its 2016 convention. In a full-page open letter in The New York Times, Mullins said that the city was "lurching backwards to the bad old days of high crime, danger-infested public spaces, and families that walk our streets worried for their safety." He accused de Blasio of making "dangerous choices" and said that the New York Police Department (NYPD) was "understaffed, overworked and underpaid."

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