The Lookout
  • David Daly remembers sitting in a garden in Afghanistan two years ago and discussing military strategy with his counterparts in the Afghan army. At this point, the U.S. had spent a decade there.

    A Marine offered a tactical suggestion, one that made perfect sense to the Americans but not to the Afghans. Daly, then a Marine captain, says an "old" Afghan major looked at him and said: "You think you have been here 10 years, but you have really only been here one year, 10 times."

    For Daly, the major had perfectly encapsulated a quote often attributed, but probably wrongly, to Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin or Mark Twain: “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”

    “He was right,” Daly writes in a first-person perspective on Yahoo News this week, “We were doing the same things there over and over with the same results. Instead of building on the experiences and lessons learned from each year, we failed to understand their point of

    Read More »from Military vets and others speak out about talks with Taliban
  • James Gandolfini at the Screen Actors Guild awards event in 2008. (Danny Moloshok/Reuters)

    It's been less than 24 hours since James Gandolfini, the 51-year-old award-winning actor, died while vacationing with his 13-year-old son in Rome, Italy.

    But that, apparently, was more than enough time for Michael Gelb, clinical professor at New York University’s College of Dentistry, to seize the opportunity to promote his "pioneering" integrative sleep apnea treatment center.

    "Might the iconic 'Sopranos' actor's legendary loud snore been a warning sign?" an email pitch from Gelb's publicist, sent on Thursday morning, read. An excerpt:

    Enter Dr. Michael Gelb, clinical professor at New York University’s College of Dentistry and founder of The Gelb Center, a pioneer in integrative sleep apnea treatments: “James Gandolfini’s snoring was well-known. What’s less well known is that snoring is a warning sign of obstructive sleep apnea, which is linked to higher risks of heart attacks and strokes for people with cardiovascular disease. More than 38,000 people a year die from this disease,

    Read More »from Shameless doc’s PR pitch: Gandolfini’s death ‘a wake-up call to guys who snore like freight trains’
  • Deidre Hansen (left) with her son Sgt. Joshua Hansen and his children Jesse James (in hat) and Trinity Rose (Paul Fraughton/the Salt Lake Tribune)

    Sgt. Joshua Hansen, struck nine times by IEDs, has received a Bronze Star for his service in Iraq, reports the Salt Lake Tribune.

    A spokesman for the Utah Department of Veterans Affairs confirmed the details to Yahoo News.

    “I have the greatest admiration for combat veterans," Terry Schow, executive director of the Utah Department of Veterans Affairs, told Yahoo news by telephone. "He had one of the more dangerous jobs. He took out IEDs, obviously that saves lives. He’s a very humble, self-effacing young man," Schow added.

    According to the Tribune, the ninth hit to Hansen's personnel carrier was on March 15, 2007. Although wounded, he helped another injured solider who was having trouble breathing before losing consciousness.

    Hansen was awarded the Bronze Star, according to the Tribune, for "'exceptionally meritorious service' during the six months in which he served as a team leader for 2nd Platoon, Company A of the U.S. Army’s 321st Engineers, a reserve unit based partly in Ogden.

    Read More »from Soldier awarded Bronze Star for service in Iraq

Pagination

(3,631 Stories)
  • Fears and rumours of Ebola stalk Freetown-Paris flight

    Chinese people fleeing Ebola, angry Africans, understaffed flight crew, rumours and fears: the Air France flight from Freetown to Paris seemed to encapsulate the global panic in the face of the Ebola outbreak. The crew is short-staffed because employees are not exactly beating down the door of the Airbus A330 to fly to or from Ebola-hit West Africa. Air France is one of the few airlines still flying to affected countries, as nations close their borders for fear of the outbreak that has claimed around 1,350 lives. No one wore masks on the 20-minute hop between Freetown and Conakry (180 kilometres, 110 miles), nor the long-haul flight to Paris that landed early Thursday morning.

  • New fear: What happens in Ferguson if no charges?
    New fear: What happens in Ferguson if no charges?

    FERGUSON, Mo. (AP) — Conditions calmed this week in Ferguson after nights of sometimes violent unrest stemming from the fatal shooting of a black 18-year-old by a white police officer. But a delicate and crucial question lingers: What happens if the grand jury now considering the case doesn't return a charge against the officer?

  • Who was customer 379? Starbucks customers 'pay it forward' in Florida for 378 orders
    Who was customer 379? Starbucks customers 'pay it forward' in Florida for 378 orders

    At approximately 7 a.m. on Wednesday, a woman in her mid-60s ordered an iced coffee from the drive-thru at a St. Petersburg, Florida, Starbucks and offered to pay for a caramel macchiato ordered by the person behind her. For the next 11 hours, nearly 400 customers followed suit.

  • New Samsung promo teases the one Galaxy Note 4 feature you’ll never see on any iPhone
    New Samsung promo teases the one Galaxy Note 4 feature you’ll never see on any iPhone

    Samsung is getting ready to announce the Galaxy Note 4 at IFA 2014 in Germany early next month, and the company on Friday released a teaser video that highlights one of the iconic features of the Galaxy Note series and its advantages – the S Pen stylus. FROM EARLIER: Samsung sees an ALS charity campaign as the perfect opportunity to troll Apple again Each Galaxy Note phablet model to date has come with its own built-in stylus, a characteristic not shared by any other Samsung flagship phone. The short 75-second teaser ad focuses on the Galaxy Note’s stylus as a device that offers a unique ability to take handwritten notes on your smartphone. “Handwriting is extremely important,” Samsung wrote on YouTube. “However,

  • Two Galileo satellites lose their way
    Two Galileo satellites lose their way

    Two European Galileo satellites fired into space by a Russian-built rocket on Friday from French Guiana failed to reach their intended orbit, launch firm Arianespace said Saturday. "Observations taken after the separation of the satellites from the Soyuz VS09 (rocket) for the Galileo Mission show a gap between the orbit achieved and that which was planned," the company said in a statement. The teams of industries and agencies involved in the early operations of the satellites are investigating the potential implications on the mission," it added. Arianespace declined to comment on whether their trajectories can be corrected.

  • What to do if your Social Security number was stolen
    What to do if your Social Security number was stolen

    If your data was part of the recent hospital information breach, take these four steps to protect yourself.

  • 3 Stages of Saving and Spending in Retirement

    The same goes for your retirement years. Although you have probably calculated the value of your nest egg in terms of annual retirement income, what you will be spending immediately after leaving the working world will likely be very different as you move further into retirement. The average retiree can expect three phases of retirement: early retirement -- a period of travel, hobbies and adventure;

  • Ebola Outbreak: Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf
    Ebola Outbreak: Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf

    Liberia's President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf expressed joy today about the recovery of American missionaries Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol in an exclusive interview with Yahoo Global News Anchor Katie Couric. "We want to thank them for the service that they have rendered our country. And I'm glad Dr. Brantly said he's going to come back to Liberia. We just love him," President Sirleaf said.

Follow Yahoo! News