The Lookout
  • David Daly remembers sitting in a garden in Afghanistan two years ago and discussing military strategy with his counterparts in the Afghan army. At this point, the U.S. had spent a decade there.

    A Marine offered a tactical suggestion, one that made perfect sense to the Americans but not to the Afghans. Daly, then a Marine captain, says an "old" Afghan major looked at him and said: "You think you have been here 10 years, but you have really only been here one year, 10 times."

    For Daly, the major had perfectly encapsulated a quote often attributed, but probably wrongly, to Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin or Mark Twain: “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”

    “He was right,” Daly writes in a first-person perspective on Yahoo News this week, “We were doing the same things there over and over with the same results. Instead of building on the experiences and lessons learned from each year, we failed to understand their point of

    Read More »from Military vets and others speak out about talks with Taliban
  • James Gandolfini at the Screen Actors Guild awards event in 2008. (Danny Moloshok/Reuters)

    It's been less than 24 hours since James Gandolfini, the 51-year-old award-winning actor, died while vacationing with his 13-year-old son in Rome, Italy.

    But that, apparently, was more than enough time for Michael Gelb, clinical professor at New York University’s College of Dentistry, to seize the opportunity to promote his "pioneering" integrative sleep apnea treatment center.

    "Might the iconic 'Sopranos' actor's legendary loud snore been a warning sign?" an email pitch from Gelb's publicist, sent on Thursday morning, read. An excerpt:

    Enter Dr. Michael Gelb, clinical professor at New York University’s College of Dentistry and founder of The Gelb Center, a pioneer in integrative sleep apnea treatments: “James Gandolfini’s snoring was well-known. What’s less well known is that snoring is a warning sign of obstructive sleep apnea, which is linked to higher risks of heart attacks and strokes for people with cardiovascular disease. More than 38,000 people a year die from this disease,

    Read More »from Shameless doc’s PR pitch: Gandolfini’s death ‘a wake-up call to guys who snore like freight trains’
  • Deidre Hansen (left) with her son Sgt. Joshua Hansen and his children Jesse James (in hat) and Trinity Rose (Paul Fraughton/the Salt Lake Tribune)

    Sgt. Joshua Hansen, struck nine times by IEDs, has received a Bronze Star for his service in Iraq, reports the Salt Lake Tribune.

    A spokesman for the Utah Department of Veterans Affairs confirmed the details to Yahoo News.

    “I have the greatest admiration for combat veterans," Terry Schow, executive director of the Utah Department of Veterans Affairs, told Yahoo news by telephone. "He had one of the more dangerous jobs. He took out IEDs, obviously that saves lives. He’s a very humble, self-effacing young man," Schow added.

    According to the Tribune, the ninth hit to Hansen's personnel carrier was on March 15, 2007. Although wounded, he helped another injured solider who was having trouble breathing before losing consciousness.

    Hansen was awarded the Bronze Star, according to the Tribune, for "'exceptionally meritorious service' during the six months in which he served as a team leader for 2nd Platoon, Company A of the U.S. Army’s 321st Engineers, a reserve unit based partly in Ogden.

    Read More »from Soldier awarded Bronze Star for service in Iraq

Pagination

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  • Nadal's claycourt streak ended by bold Ferrer

    (Reuters) - Rafael Nadal's 30-match claycourt winning streak ended on Friday when the world number one was stunned 7-6(1) 6-4 by fellow Spaniard David Ferrer in the Monte Carlo Masters quarter-finals. Sixth seed Ferrer, who had beaten Nadal on clay only once 10 years ago and was brushed aside by the muscular left-hander in the French Open final last year, relied on his devastating forehand to prevail in over two hours. Nadal, who made an uncharacteristic string of unforced errors, was looking to recapture his Monte Carlo crown after Serb Novak Djokovic ended his eight-year reign in last year's final - his last defeat on the slow surface. Former world number one Roger Federer, seeded fourth, got off to a sluggish start but saw off local favourite Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 2-6 7-6(6) 6-1 to set up a meeting with second seed Djokovic who rallied to beat unheralded Spaniard Guillermo Garcia Lopez 4-6 6-3 6-1.

  • A Mother's Day to Remember: Winner Gets Portrait By Anne Geddes

      By Teri Whitcraft and Carrie Halperin For Allison Dearstyne of Dunkirk, Md., her first Mother’s Day as a mom may be the best ever. Last November,  when she was nine months pregnant, she and her husband Richard entered a photo in the Million Moms...

  • South Korean media reports ferry captain's arrest
    South Korean media reports ferry captain's arrest

    A team of police and prosecutors had sought on Friday arrest warrants for Lee Joon-Seok, 52, and two of his crew without specifying charges, the coastguard had said, after the incident that left 28 people confirmed dead and another 268 still missing. On Saturday the Yonhap news agency reported that Lee was in custody and faced five charges, including negligence of duty and violation of maritime law.

  • American identifies cleric in US terrorism case
    American identifies cleric in US terrorism case

    NEW YORK (AP) — A man told a jury Friday that an Egyptian cleric on trial on terrorism charges is the "very angry" imam he met in London years ago.

  • Can Israel's natural gas reserves pump up regional peace?

    After years of relying on its neighbors for energy, Israel is poised to become an exporter of natural gas – provided it can find buyers. But some of the most promising customers or conduits for its newfound riches are the very countries with which Israel is at loggerheads. Optimists argue that the mutual economic benefits of natural gas investment could give governments the incentive they need to work together. Already, Israeli companies have signed deals to supply Palestinian and Jordanian companies with natural gas. 

  • Powerful earthquake rattles Mexico, shakes buildings
    Powerful earthquake rattles Mexico, shakes buildings

    By Dave Graham MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - A powerful earthquake shook Mexico on Friday, damaging more than 100 homes in the southwestern state of Guerrero and opening cracks in some buildings but there were no reports of deaths. Striking close to the popular beach resort of Acapulco, the 7.2 magnitude quake sent people scurrying out of homes and hotels, causing brief panic from the Pacific coast to states in central and eastern parts of Mexico. At least 127, mostly adobe homes were damaged in Guerrero. Some people in Mexico City fled homes in panic when the quake hit.

  • Nobody’s Sure How or Why an American Plane Ended Up in Iran
    Nobody’s Sure How or Why an American Plane Ended Up in Iran

    On Tuesday, a New York Times reporter in Tehran spotted an American plane at Mehrabad Airport in Tehran, an extremely unique sight given the harsh sanctions imposed on the country by the United States and other Western nations. For an American plane to enter Iran legally, a number of hoops would need to be jumped through. The Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control needs to give approval for an American aircraft to travel to Iran—they gave a “no comment” to the Times. Complicating things further, the jet’s engines are made by General Electric, meaning that the Commerce Department would also have to sign off on allowing American-made equipment to enter the isolated country.

  • Ukraine local boss puts price on head of Russian 'saboteurs'

    By Pavel Polityuk and Alastair Macdonald KIEV (Reuters) - A billionaire regional governor in eastern Ukraine put a $10,000 bounty on the head of any Russian "saboteur" on Thursday and pledged a reward for the Ukrainian troops who shot protesters at their base overnight. Aides to banking and energy tycoon Igor Kolomoisky, who was appointed last month by the new government in Kiev to run the industrial region of Dnipropetrovsk, also offered payments for weapons handed in to the local authorities and a reward of $200,000 for anyone who "liberated" an occupied public building. It was the latest in a cascade of piecemeal initiatives from Ukrainian leaders since pro-Russian militants - backed, Kiev says, by special forces sent by Moscow - seized facilities in the nearby regions of Donetsk and Luhansk. It also highlighted the role of wealthy business "oligarchs" in Ukraine's politics - and in its relations with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

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