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  • NYSE stocks posting largest percentage decreases

    A look at the 10 biggest percentage decliners on New York Stock Exchange at 1 p.m.: On Assignment Inc. fell 23.4 percent to $26.75. hhgregg Inc. fell 15.6 percent to $7.17. L-3 Communications Holdings ...

  • Early Glance: Railroad companies

    Shares of some top railroad companies are down at 10 a.m.: CSX fell $.33 or 1.1 percent, to $30.13. Canadian National Railway Co. fell $.39 or .6 percent, to $67.29. Canadian Pacific Railway Ltd. fell ...

  • 10 Things to Know for Today
    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

  • Vatican taking action in divisive Paraguay diocese

    VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis is taking action in a divisive diocese in Paraguay where an Argentine priest, accused by a former superior of being a "serious threat to young people," has been removed as the No. 2.

  • Otzi 'The Iceman' Had Heart Disease Genes
    Otzi 'The Iceman' Had Heart Disease Genes

    Ötzi the Iceman, a well-preserved mummy discovered in the Alps, may have had a genetic predisposition to heart disease, new research suggests. The new finding may explain why the man — who lived 5,300 years ago, stayed active and certainly didn't smoke or wolf down processed food in front of the TV — nevertheless had hardened arteries when he was felled by an arrow and bled to death on an alpine glacier. "We were very surprised that he had a very strong disposition for cardiovascular disease," said study co-author Albert Zink, a paleopathologist at the Institute for Mummies and the Iceman at the European Academy of Bozen/Bolzano in Italy. Past research has revealed that Ötzi likely suffered from joint pain, Lyme disease and tooth decay, and computed tomography (CT) scanning revealed calcium buildups, a sign of atherosclerosis, in his arteries.

  • Hackers can tap USB devices in new attacks, researcher warns

    By Jim Finkle BOSTON (Reuters) - USB devices such as keyboards, thumb-drives and mice can be used to hack into personal computers in a potential new class of attacks that evade all known security protections, a top computer researcher revealed on Thursday. Karsten Nohl, chief scientist with Berlin's SR Labs, noted that hackers could load malicious software onto tiny, low-cost computer chips that control functions of USB devices but which have no built-in shields against tampering with their code. It is almost like a magic trick," said Nohl, whose research firm is known for uncovering major flaws in mobile phone technology. Nohl said his firm has performed attacks by writing malicious code onto USB control chips used in thumb drives and smartphones.

  • Brazil pin-up Neymar mobbed in Japan
    Brazil pin-up Neymar mobbed in Japan

    Tokyo caught "Neymar fever" on Thursday when the Brazilian superstar jetted into the Japanese capital sporting sunglasses, baseball cap and designer stubble on a whistle-stop visit to sign a sponsorship deal with a bed manufacturer. "My back is getting better and I'm hoping to join up with my team-mates as soon as possible," Neymar told reporters later as he perched on a foam mattress the makers claimed had secret relaxation properties. Neymar will form part of arguably the world's most fearsome strike-force alongside Lionel Messi and new Barca signing Luis Suarez. I'm not striving to be the world's greatest player -- just the best player I can be in order to help Brazil." Dressed in black with his cap on back-to-front and wearing a chunky gold chain, Neymar appeared on Japan's Fuji TV, triggering bedlam in the studio as guests and audience members in replica Brazil jerseys lined up to have their shirts signed.

  • World powers must hold Israel accountable: U.N. rights boss

    By Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - The top U.N. human rights official said on Thursday she believed Israel was deliberately defying international law in its military offensive in Gaza and that world powers should hold it accountable for possible war crimes. Israel has attacked homes, schools, hospitals, Gaza's only power plant and U.N. premises in apparent violation of the Geneva Conventions, according to Navi Pillay, U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights. "Therefore I would say that they appear to be defying... deliberate defiance of obligations that international law imposes on Israel," Pillay told a news briefing.

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