The Lookout
  • Radiation sign on grey wall (photo: Thinkstock)Radiation sign on grey wall. (photo: Thinkstock)

    Two men from upstate New York have been accused of trying to make and sell a portable X-ray weapon that they "intended to sell to Jewish groups or a southern branch of the Ku Klux Klan," and which could be fired at people perceived to be enemies of Israel, the Times Union reports.

    Glendon Scott Crawford, 49, and Eric J. Feight, 54, have been charged with conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists, according to the paper. The two men could face 15 years in prison and $250,000 fines.

    A press release from the Department of Justice explains investigators said that Crawford reached out to Jewish organizations (at least one of which reported his strange behavior to the police) for assistance with the technology involved in making the X-ray weapon. The remotely controlled X-ray weapon they designed would supposedly have been able to deliver lethal doses of radiation to unsuspecting victims.

    The weapon was never operable, according to reports.

    "This case demonstrates how we must

    Read More »from Two men accused of bizarre radiation plot
  • The reconstruction of TWA Flight 800's fuselage. (Daniel Brooks/Epix)

    The producers of an upcoming documentary on TWA Flight 800—which exploded and crashed into the waters off Long Island, N.Y., on July 17, 1996, killing all 230 people on board—claim to have proof that a missile caused the Paris-bound flight to crash. And six former investigators who took part in the film say there was a cover-up and want the case reopened.

    "There was a lack of coordination and willful denial of information," Hank Hughes, a senior accident investigator for the National Transportation Safety Board, said on Wednesday during a conference call with reporters. "There were 755 witnesses. At no time was information provided by the witnesses shared by the FBI."

    Jim Speer, an accident investigator at the time of the crash for the Airline Pilots Association, who sifted through the recovered wreckage in a hangar, said he discovered holes consistent with those that would be formed by a high-energy blast in the right wing. He requested it be tested for explosives. When the test came

    Read More »from TWA Flight 800 crash not due to gas tank explosion, former investigators say
  • Hastings in Vermont (Penguin/Rolling Stone)

    Michael Hastings, the award-winning journalist whose explosive 2010 Rolling Stone profile of U.S. Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal ("The Runaway General") led to McChrystal's resignation, died Tuesday in an early morning car accident in Los Angeles, the magazine said. He was 33.

    "Hard-charging, unabashedly opinionated, Hastings was original and at times abrasive," Rolling Stone, where he was a contributing editor, said in an obituary. "He had little patience for flacks and spinmeisters and will be remembered for his enthusiastic breaches of the conventions of access journalism."

    Hastings, who covered the 2008 presidential election for Newsweek, was hired by Buzzfeed last spring to cover President Barack Obama's 2012 re-election campaign.

    "We are shocked and devastated by the news that Michael Hastings is gone," Buzzfeed editor-in-chief Ben Smith said in a statement. "Michael was a great, fearless journalist with an incredible instinct for the story, and a gift for finding ways to make his

    Read More »from Journalist Michael Hastings dies in car crash at 33

Pagination

(3,632 Stories)
  • Nasdaq stocks posting largest percentage increases

    A look at the 10 biggest percentage gainers on Nasdaq at the close of trading: China Information Technology Inc. rose 18.9 percent to $5.23. Conn's Inc. rose 14.5 percent to $45.48. BioFuel Energy rose ...

  • Huge Big Boy steam locomotive coming back to life
    Huge Big Boy steam locomotive coming back to life

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — In its prime, a massive steam locomotive known as Big Boy No. 4014 was a moving eruption of smoke and vapor, a 6,300-horsepower brute dragging heavy freight trains over the mountains of Wyoming and Utah.

  • China angered by Britain's report on human rights, cancels talks

    BEIJING/LONDON (Reuters) - China on Tuesday condemned Britain for interfering in its domestic affairs, in response to a human rights report, a day after the British government said Beijing had called off human rights talks. Britain listed China as "a country of concern" in its annual human rights report last week, saying it had observed increased curbs on freedom of expression, association and assembly in 2013. It also cited reports of "the forcible suppression of ethnic unrest in Tibet and Xinjiang." China reacted by calling off talks with Britain on Beijing's human rights record.

  • Iran expects next payment under nuclear deal, signaling compliance

    By Fredrik Dahl and Mehrdad Balali VIENNA/DUBAI (Reuters) - Iran expects to get a fifth installment this week of previously blocked overseas funds, a senior official was quoted as saying, a payment that would confirm Tehran's compliance with an interim deal with world powers to curb its nuclear program. Separately, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said "tough issues" faced the Islamic Republic and the six major powers in negotiating a permanent accord to resolve the decade-old nuclear dispute but that it was still possible by a late July deadline. "This means removal of sanctions and restoring financial relations with the rest of the world," he said, making clear Iran's aim to have sanctions that limit oil exports and make financial transactions difficult lifted as soon as possible. Diplomats and experts say it will be difficult, but not impossible, to resolve the standoff over nuclear activities which Iran says are peaceful but the West fears may be aimed at developing nuclear weapons capability.

  • Chinese herb beats drug at rheumatoid arthritis: study

    A Chinese herb called thunder god vine works better than a widely-prescribed pharmaceutical drug at easing rheumatoid arthritis, a study published on Monday said. The herb has long been used in China to treat this potentially crippling autoimmune disease, which typically strikes hand and foot joints. In a study published in the British journal BMJ Open, Chinese researchers recruited 207 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and gave them either the herb; The benchmark for improvement is called the ACR 50 -- named after the American College of Rheumatology -- which indicates a 50-percent improvement in the tally of tender or swollen joints and other criteria such as pain and disability.

  • Hundreds of earthquakes strike central Idaho, rattling nerves

    By Laura Zuckerman SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) - Hundreds of low-level and medium-sized earthquakes have struck central Idaho since last month, puzzling geologists who wonder whether the ruptures portend a much larger temblor to come or are merely the rumblings of a seismic fault previously thought to be dormant. The recent earthquake swarm, beginning on March 24 and climaxed by a 4.9 magnitude tremor on Saturday, has produced no reports of injuries or severe damage but has rattled nerves in a region where Idaho's most powerful known quake, measured at 6.9, killed two children in 1983. Saturday's earthquake was the strongest recorded in the state since 2005 and was followed on Monday by a magnitude 4.4 event that struck 10 miles north of the small ranching community of Challis, Idaho, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The likelihood of a severe earthquake coming on the heels of the recent swarm is low, but much is perplexing about the series of tremors, said Bill Phillips, a geologist with the Idaho Geological Survey at the University of Idaho.

  • Battle over Scottish independence slightly tightens in new poll
    Battle over Scottish independence slightly tightens in new poll

    The battle over Scottish independence is tightening, with a new poll on Wednesday showing independence supporters gaining ground slightly as more Scots get involved in the debate. The latest poll by TNS showed 29 percent of Scots intended to vote "Yes" to independence in the September 18 referendum, up from 28 percent a month ago, while 41 percent planned to vote "No," down from 42 percent. The head of TNS Scotland, Tom Costley, said the poll of 988 people showed a continuing gradual narrowing in the polls, with a gap now of 12 percentage points between the two sides compared to 19 points in September when the polling series began. About four million of Scotland's 5.3 million population are eligible to vote in the referendum which is open to all Scottish residents aged 16 and above.

  • This college’s dorms are mighty disgusting
    This college’s dorms are mighty disgusting

    There have been complaints of mold, missing ceiling tiles, burst pipes, water stains, and just general disrepair. It was bad enough for one student that she’s transferring to another college.

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