The Lookout

Paula Broadwell seen holed up in brother’s home

Dylan Stableford
The Lookout

Paula Broadwell in her brother's home on Nov. 13, 2012 (Cliff Owen/AP)

Paula Broadwell, the biographer turned mistress of ex-CIA Director David Petraeus, was spotted Tuesday, the first time she's been seen since the news rocking the Washington intelligence community broke.

In photographs published by the Associated Press, Broadwell is seen wearing a pink sweater and holding a glass of what appears to be red wine inside her brother's Washington, D.C., home.

The 40-year-old has not made any public statement since Petraeus announced his resignation on Friday. Earlier on Tuesday, authorities in Maryland confirmed a report that Broadwell's North Carolina driver's license was found in D.C.'s Rock Creek Park by a jogger. Broadwell's attorney, Robert F. Muse, said Broadwell had recently lost her driver's license, but would not disclose her whereabouts.

[Related: Who's who in the Petraeus scandal]

On Monday, the FBI searched Broadwell's Charlotte, N.C., home for several hours and was seen leaving with boxes of material. A senior law enforcement official told the Washington Post that the "late-night seizure" was part of "a renewed focus by investigators on sensitive material found in her possession."

(In an odd coincidence noted by the Daily Beast, Broadwell's two-story brick home in Charlotte is in the same Dilworth section as the home of Rielle Hunter, John Edwards' former mistress.)

According to the Washingtonian, Broadwell and her husband were at a Virginia bed-and-breakfast celebrating her 40th birthday when details of her extramarital affair with Petraeus broke on Friday.

[Slideshow: The Petraeus affair]

Broadwell's birthday party—which had been scheduled for this past Saturday in Washington, D.C.—was subsequently cancelled.

Petraeus resigned after an FBI investigation sparked by allegedly vicious emails sent by Broadwell to Tampa, Fla., socialite Jill Kelley. Broadwell, whose best-selling biography of Petraeus, "All In," was published in January, spent more than a year with Petraeus and his close associates to research and produce the book.

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