Our Country

Charlie Worsham: Always Listening for a Hook

Our Country

 

Charlie Worsham is one of those musicians who have stunned those around with prodigious talent since a very early age; in fact, the 28-year-old was already receiving accolades from his home state of Mississippi for his unusual musical accomplishments. Add to that his Berklee School of Music education, and, well, it's no wonder he's made a tidal wave in Nashville of late.

"You know, I only claim to play three instruments," Worsham protests, when asked if he's a prodigy on a range of platforms. However, he does amend that a bit: "My Dad is a banker, but a drummer at heart; and my Mom used to teach piano lessons when she was younger. So I can play some piano, play a little drums, and fake the bass – but banjo, mandolin, and guitar are my thing."

Worsham is being too humble. He can actually play the fiddle as well (although he says "playing in tune and not sounding like a cat being tortured is a very hard struggle") and he admits to being a "ProTools nerd" in the studio. All that said, it doesn't matter ultimately whether he plays one instrument or 20, he's easily one of the most talented young musicians currently on Music City's rising-star circuit.

Worsham released his debut album, Rubberband, one year ago, following stints in the now-defunct Nashville band KingBilly and an opening slot on Taylor Swift's 2011 tour. He's since received a slew of critical acclaim for his set, which he largely wrote himself and includes appearances from Vince Gill and Marty Stuart.

"I feel like you become a songwriter when you claim that it's sort of like a switch flipped, and you’re always writing," Worsham notes. "Even in your sleep, you’re always thinking about it in the back of your mind. The true writing -- when you’re officially writing -- that’s just when its front of mind, but its always there. You’re always listening for a hook."

Worsham is putting the hooks he's collected so far to good use, as he's currently thinking about his next album. "I’m actually working on writing songs for whatever my next release is," he says. "I had a long, long time to make Rubberband, and I originally thought that that record would last two years. Once I got over realizing that that's not gonna happen, and sort of got my perspective back I realized, 'Man I’m really fortunate. I get to write music, make music for a living.'"

"As new as some of the songs are to the few people who do know my music right now, I’ve had those songs for four years -- maybe five even. I’m ready to play some new stuff. I’ve had so many experiences out on stage for audiences too, that I’m ready to bring in some new energy," he adds.

"I want to bring a really rocking party."

 

View Comments (3)