Pulse of Canada

Do you think Canadian cities and towns are well prepared for disasters?

Pulse of Canada

With the train derailment and explosions that rocked Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, as well as the flooding in Calgary, Alberta and Toronto, Ontario, man-made and natural disasters have recently been devastating cities and towns across the country.

The total of those considered missing in Lac-Mégantic has been raised to 60, with a death toll that's expected to rise currently set at 15. Calgary is still reeling from the worst flooding in the city's history and Toronto is expecting more rain, just two days after a record-setting downpour wreaked havoc during Monday evening's commute.

[ PHOTOS: Flash-floods wreak havoc in Toronto ]

As we continue to learn more about the potential cause to the train derailment in Quebec, Canadians abroad have already begun to wonder what could have been done to prevent — or at least lessen the severity — of such a catastrophe.

We now know that the devastation in Calgary could have been drastically reduced, had the provincial government followed its own 2006 report on how to lower the effects of mass flooding in the region. But there aren't many ways to prepare for a month's worth of rain in a little more than an hour, as Toronto experienced Monday evening.

[ Complete Coverage: Lac-Mégantic train disaster ]

There are man-made disasters such as Lac-Mégantic, and then there are natural disasters, which we can potentially prepare for but certainly cannot avoid.

So we ask you: Are Canadian cities well prepared for disasters? Share your thoughts in the comments area below.

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