The Sideshow
  • Persuading people to put down their phones while behind the wheel is an ongoing struggle for companies, police departments, your mom and just about everybody who has a vested interest in your not dying.

    And yet, people still do it. Perhaps this interactive PSA from Volkswagen will do a bit of good. In a video that's quickly going viral, a crowd of moviegoers enters a theater and gets ready to enjoy a flick (hopefully not "Blended").

    The lights dim and what looks like a commercial begins to roll. It's a first-person-POV video of somebody driving. Just motoring along, la dee da. Not much going on. The seconds tick by, the crowd is lulled into boredom, until everybody in the audience receives a "location-based" text message from someone behind the scenes.

    As soon as the moviegoers take their eyes off the commercial to reach for their phones, the car swerves off the road and crashes. The audience members gasp and then are silent as they ponder what just happened.

    The point is clear: Don't

    Read More »from VW produces eerie, interactive anti-texting PSA
  • The words "paddle boarders" and "deer rescue" don't often belong in the same sentence, but when they do, it's usually a story worth writing about.

    Two paddle boarders helped authorities from New Hampshire Fish and Game and the Hampton, N.H., police department rescue two deer that had wandered into the ocean Friday.

    Paddle boarders Matthew Roy and Eric Tidman told WMUR that they were enjoying their morning out on the water near Hampton Beach when they saw two deer struggling to swim in the surf. Authorities were called, and Operation: Aqua-Bambi was underway.

    The rescue took more than two hours, and the paddle boarders ended up playing a big role. Initially, rescue crews attempted to coax the deer back to the beach, according to WMUR. However, rather than return to shore, the distressed and clearly exhausted deer kept swimming.

    The paddle boarders, who we're guessing had no idea their morning was going to take a turn for the heroic, paddled out into the ocean to assist. Roy used a snare

    Read More »from Operation Aqua-Bambi: Paddle boarders assist in deer rescue
  • Fair or not, the postal service isn't exactly known for innovation. But 55 years ago, they tried something very different — maybe a little too different: delivery via guided missile.

    The missile wasn't intended to replace your friendly neighborhood mail carrier, make 53 different stops on Main Street, and develop an irrational fear of dogs. Instead, it was tested as a new way of getting large amounts of mail from point A to point B, where it would then be delivered the old-fashioned way, CBS News explains.

    The method was tested on June 8, 1959, when an unmanned missile was launched from a submarine off the coast of Florida. Inside the missile were 3,000 pieces of mail to various VIPs around the country, including one letter from Postmaster General Arthur Summerfield to President Dwight Eisenhower.

    The missile took off without a hitch, landed as planned, and the mail was then delivered. In the letter to Eisenhower, Summerfield wrote about how this new technology will "be utilized in

    Read More »from Once upon a time, snail mail was missile mail

Pagination

(2,381 Stories)
  • Teen gets 11 years for carving swastika on boy

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — An Oregon teenager who carved a swastika into another teen's forehead as he and others tortured the boy has been sentenced to 11 years in prison.

  • FDA clears Eliquis for new use against blood clots

    Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer said Thursday that federal regulators have expanded approval of their blood thinner Eliquis to treat two types of dangerous blood clots. The Food and Drug Administration ...

  • How doctors know an Ebola patient is no longer contagious
    How doctors know an Ebola patient is no longer contagious

    Two American patients who survived the deadly virus are discharged from the hospital, and doctors seek to reassure the public there's nothing to fear

  • Fears and rumours of Ebola stalk Freetown-Paris flight

    Chinese people fleeing Ebola, angry Africans, understaffed flight crew, rumours and fears: the Air France flight from Freetown to Paris seemed to encapsulate the global panic in the face of the Ebola outbreak. The crew is short-staffed because employees are not exactly beating down the door of the Airbus A330 to fly to or from Ebola-hit West Africa. Air France is one of the few airlines still flying to affected countries, as nations close their borders for fear of the outbreak that has claimed around 1,350 lives. No one wore masks on the 20-minute hop between Freetown and Conakry (180 kilometres, 110 miles), nor the long-haul flight to Paris that landed early Thursday morning.

  • High school senior says she was suspended for saying 'bless you'
    High school senior says she was suspended for saying 'bless you'

    A high school senior in Tennessee says she was given an in-school suspension for saying "bless you" to classmate who had sneezed.

  • An Apple carrier partner just confirmed the iPhone 6
    An Apple carrier partner just confirmed the iPhone 6

    Just about everyone who cares at all about smartphones knows that Apple’s next-generation iPhone 6 is just weeks away from being announced during a huge press conference on September 9th. Even still, Apple generally likes to be the first company to announce its new devices and make them official before its carrier partners and distributors start sharing their plans for new iPhones. At least one wireless carrier didn’t get that memo, however, as China Telecom has apparently just confirmed the iPhone 6 publicly and shared a few details about the device. FROM EARLIER: Huge leak shows the 5.5-inch iPhone’s rear shell side-by-side with the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 Apple’s various carrier and retail partners tend to walk on eggshells in an effort to keep

  • Retired cops side with Ferguson protesters
    Retired cops side with Ferguson protesters

    Retired Philadelphia police captain Ray Lewis cut an arresting figure in his crisp uniform, dark blue cap -- and a sign demanding "the truth" about the fatal police shooting of an unarmed black youth. Lewis turned heads and got people talking Thursday in his first appearance at the nightly protests in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson that followed the August 9 death there at the hands of a white policeman of 18-year-old Michael Brown. "These people have been exploited and oppressed their entire lives, and now they have their own police department perhaps murdering one of their own," he told AFP around the corner from where Brown was fatally shot. Lewis, who is white, served 24 years in the Philadelphia police force, most of them in the city's edgy north side, before retiring eight years ago and embracing political activism.

  • Japan mulls building its own fighter jets: report
    Japan mulls building its own fighter jets: report

    Japan is considering building its own fighter jets after years of playing second fiddle in a US construction partnership, a report said Thursday, in a move likely to stoke fears of its military resurgence among Asian neighbours. Japan's attempt in the 1980s to build its first purely domestic fighters since World War II faced US resistance and resulted in joint US-Japan development and production of the F-2, the Nikkei newspaper said. The defence ministry plans to seek about 40 billion yen ($387 million) in state funding for the next year starting in April 2015 to test experimental engines and radar-dodging stealth airframe designs for a purely Japanese fighter, the report said. There is a growing need for Japan to develop a long-haul, highly stealthy fighter jets in face of China's increasing assertiveness in the East China Sea, where the two countries are locked in a dispute over a group of Tokyo-controlled islands, the Nikkei said.

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