The Sideshow
  • Couple married for 72 years die just one day apart

    After being married 72 years, June and Norbert Rogers of South Carolina died just one day apart.

    Their story seems fit for a Nicholas Sparks movie. They eloped in 1941, when Norbert was in the Navy and June was still in her teens. Her mother said it wouldn't last, but the couple proved her wrong, staying married seven decades and having five children together, WYFF reports. They also had 14 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren, according to their joint obituary.

    While June was known to be seriously ill before her death this month, her husband was believed to have been in good health, according to WYFF's report. However, it was Norbert who went first, mere hours before his wife of 72 years. He was 97. She was 89.

    Wes Crisp, a friend of the Rogers family, told WYFF, "I believe he willed himself to go before she did because there were no visible signs that he was sick. So you could say, I guess, that he died of a broken heart."

    Those who asked the Rogers for marriage advice were

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  • Surreal exchange during legal deposition recreated by New York Times

    'When you say "photocopying machine," what do you mean?'

    Will you laugh? Yes. Will you cry? Yes. Will you, after watching the above video, wish you could sit in on a deposition whenever you wanted to be entertained?

    If they were all like this one — absolutely.

    This video, produced for the New York Times, recreates an actual word-for-word conversation between a lawyer and a man being deposed for a court case involving the Cuyahoga County Recorder’s Office in Ohio.

    The lawyer's initial question involved photocopiers. Does the Cuyahoga County Recorder’s Office have any? A seemingly simple inquiry that took a turn for the surreal after the witness, an IT expert, asked the lawyer to define what he meant by photocopier.

    Their exchange is maddening, a mixture of Abbott and Costello's "Who's on First" and the absurdity of "Catch-22." And it's all verbatim. Somewhere, several years ago, people actually had this conversation as a stenographer took notes and, presumably, did his or her best not to jump out a window.

    The actual case that inspired the

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  • It's all Greek, and then some: $1K offered to decipher strange notes in Homer's 'Odyssey'

    University of Chicago hopes to solve mystery of margin text in 1504 edition

    A page from Book 11 of Homer's Odyssey with unidentified margin notes. (University of Chicago)

    Once upon a time, somebody read this 1504 edition of Homer's "Odyssey," and, apparently taken by it, wrote in the margins of Book 11, which describes the journey to the underworld of Hades.

    The man who donated the book to the University of Chicago wants to solve the mystery of what was handwritten around the text, and is offering $1,000 to whoever can successfully decipher the notes.

    The unidentified donor suspects the script is a kind of 19th-century shorthand, possibly French, but "he acknowledges that this hypothesis remains unsupported by any evidence offered to date," according to the University of Chicago.  The notes appear on only two pages.

    It may be worth noting the University of Chicago is the same institution where, in 2012, a mysterious package arrived, addressed to "Henry Walton Jones, Jr.," better known as Indiana Jones. It turns out the item was a replica from the 1989 film "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade." The piece of memorabilia had apparently been sold online

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