The Sideshow

Pagination

(2,293 Stories)
  • A Mother's Day to Remember: Winner Gets Portrait By Anne Geddes

      By Teri Whitcraft and Carrie Halperin For Allison Dearstyne of Dunkirk, Md., her first Mother’s Day as a mom may be the best ever. Last November,  when she was nine months pregnant, she and her husband Richard entered a photo in the Million Moms...

  • SpaceX making Easter delivery of station supplies
    SpaceX making Easter delivery of station supplies

    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A SpaceX supply ship rocketed toward the International Space Station on Friday, setting the stage for an Easter morning delivery and urgent spacewalking repairs later in the week.

  • Looming, creeping landslide splits home in Wyoming
    Looming, creeping landslide splits home in Wyoming

    JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — A slow-motion disaster is unfolding in the Wyoming resort town of Jackson as a creeping landslide that split a hillside home in half inches toward more houses and businesses below.

  • Atheist national conference aims at Mormon church
    Atheist national conference aims at Mormon church

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Leaders of a national atheist group say the best spot to find a nonbeliever is in a place of faith.

  • What the hell is this American plane owned by the Bank of Utah doing in IRAN?
    What the hell is this American plane owned by the Bank of Utah doing in IRAN?

    On Tuesday morning, a plane owned in trust by the Bank of Utah showed up in a very visible area of the Mehrabad Airport in Tehran, the capital of the Islamic Republic of Iran. Under President Barack Obama, the United States has eased some of the long-standing punitive economic sanctions against Iran. The Ogden-based community bank has all of 13 branches including three in Ogden, two in Salt Lake City and one in Trementon (pop. “We have no idea why that plane was at that airport,” Brett King, a Bank of Utah executive in Salt Lake City, told the Times.

  • US orange production hit by disease, juice prices soar
    US orange production hit by disease, juice prices soar

    A citrus disease spread by a tiny insect has devastated Florida's orange crop, which is expected to be the worst in nearly 30 years, and sent juice prices soaring on New York markets. The gnat-sized Asian citrus psyllid, which is infecting citrus trees across the Sunshine State with huanglongbing, or citrus greening disease, which causes fruit to taste bitter and fall from trees too soon. "It feels we are losing the fight," said Ellis Hunt, the head of a family-run citrus farm spread over about 5,000 acres (2,000 hectares) in the central Florida town of Lake Wales. Citrus greening disease has become such a problem this year that the US government has lowered its forecast for the upcoming harvest four times.

  • CURRENT DEPORTATION POLICY IS IMPOLITIC AND INHUMANE

    Jessica Colotl is a gainfully employed college graduate, a fresh-faced young woman working as a legal assistant at an Atlanta law firm. She's also a symbol of a sharp dispute between President Obama and a group of his now-wavering allies -- Latino voters who detest his deportation policy. Colotl, whose parents brought her to the United States illegally when she was 11 years old, was threatened with deportation in 2010. Her deportation was halted only after supporters, including the president of the university she attended, intervened.

  • 14 more Nigeria schoolgirls escape Islamists
    14 more Nigeria schoolgirls escape Islamists

    Maiduguri (Nigeria) (AFP) - Another 14 Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram Islamists in the northeast have escaped, leaving 85 missing on Saturday after an attack that has sparked global outrage, an official said. The unprecedented mass abduction of 129 teenage girls from the Chibok area of Borno state has been described as among the most shocking ever by Boko Haram, an extremist group blamed for killing thousands since 2009. “I am glad to say that 14 more students have escaped from their abductors,” Borno’s education commissioner Inua Kubo told journalists. They have since been sent to their family villages, while the three others had returned to their school in Chibok and were being cared for there, he said.

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