The Sideshow
  • Brave? Or a wee bit foolish? Definitely lucky.

    While visiting the Phu Luang Wildlife Sanctuary in Thailand, Tor Bowling, 27, came nose-to-trunk with a charging elephant and lived to tell the tale. The story was first reported by the New York Daily News.

    The elephant charges Bowling, who — amazingly — doesn't so much as flinch. Instead he raises his hand as if to say, "Hold it right there, Jumbo." The elephant does exactly that, putting on the brakes before trampling the tourist. The beast then retreats back into the trees,

    We think it's safe to assume that most people in the same situation would either scream, run or curl up into a ball and pray for a quick death. Bowling clearly isn't most people. He turns to the person filming the clip and gives a smile and a chuckle, like the entire thing was no big deal. Don't play chicken with this guy — you will lose.

    Bowling told the Daily News that he chose to see the experience as a positive. "I always think (everything that happens to me) is

    Read More »from Man stops charging elephant with a wave of his hand
  • And you thought human beings had odd mating rituals. A 2012 video that's going viral shows the amazing courtship dance between two Galapagos albatrosses. 

    The dance is truly a sight to behold. Two birds face each other, bow their necks, peck at each other's beaks, honk loudly, lock their jaws and strut around in circles like a '70s-era John Travolta at a Brooklyn disco.

    The clip was filmed by Phillip Nails while visiting the Galapagos Islands several years ago with his parents. In the background, you can hear the gasps and chuckles of the delighted onlookers. To their credit, the albatrosses keep their composure despite the vocal audience. These two lovebirds have eyes only for each other.

    While the ritual might look a little silly, it's a sign of real devotion between the birds. The courtship dance is something that occurs when the birds return to the Galapagos each year after spending months at sea, the BBC explains. The birds, who mate for life and can live 50 years, track each

    Read More »from Video captures the amazing mating dance of the Galapagos albatross
  • Santa Clara University (Wikimedia Commons)Santa Clara University (Wikimedia Commons)

    Like nearly all job postings, the ad seeking applicants for a quarterly adjunct lecturer position at Santa Clara University's English Department lists some desired skills and requirements.

    But forget about "must have basic knowledge of Microsoft Excel" or "excellent interpersonal skills are key" — the qualifications sought for this posting were as specific as they were over-the-top.

    According to the posting, the successful applicant should have published “at least 25 books on topics ranging from the history of Silicon Valley to the biography of microprocessing to interviews with entrepreneurs." Hmm, OK. What else? "E-books on topics such as home life in the US, home life in the UK, and water conservation.” 

    And the list goes on: The successful applicant should have a history of being "an editor of Forbes ASAP or a weekly columnist for ABC.com." Oh, and one last thing: He or she also needs to have experience hosting "television and radio productions for PBS, cable television, and ABC."

    Read More »from Have you published 25 books? You might be qualified to teach at Santa Clara U.

Pagination

(2,381 Stories)
  • Iceland volcano eruption would shut down air travel: authority
    Iceland volcano eruption would shut down air travel: authority

    Icelandic aviation authorities warned Wednesday an eruption of the nation's largest volcano would trigger a shutdown of airspace, in a potential replay of the global travel chaos triggered when another peak blew four years ago. Authorities evacuated tourists and hikers overnight from the area around Bardarbunga volcano, which kicked into seismic action on Monday with the biggest earthquake registered since 1996. "There's nothing we can do if we get another big eruption like that of Eyjafjoell except to interrupt air traffic in the dangerous areas," Icelandic Civil Aviation Administration spokesman Fridthor Eydal was quoted as saying on news site mbl.is. The eruption of Eyjafjoell, a smaller volcano, in April 2010 caused travel mayhem, stranding more than eight million travellers in the biggest airspace shut down since World War II.

  • Islamic State 'beyond anything we've seen': US
    Islamic State 'beyond anything we've seen': US

    The Islamic State poses a greater danger than a conventional "terrorist group" and is pursuing a vision that could radically alter the face of the Middle East, US defense leaders said Thursday. The IS jihadists could be contained and eventually defeated by local forces backed by the United States, but the Sunni population in both Syria and Iraq would need to reject the group, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and General Martin Dempsey told reporters. Hagel warned that the Islamic State is better armed, trained and funded than any recent militant threat.

  • Neanderthals and humans had 'ample time' to mix
    Neanderthals and humans had 'ample time' to mix

    BERLIN (AP) — Humans and Neanderthals may have coexisted in Europe for more than 5,000 years, providing ample time for the two species to meet and mix, according to new research.

  • 'No green jacket for you', a teasing Woods tells McIlroy
    'No green jacket for you', a teasing Woods tells McIlroy

    By Larry Fine PARAMUS New Jersey (Reuters) - Rory McIlroy, the hottest golfer on the planet, is not thinking about taking the torch from Tiger Woods as the sport's next dominant player, but the easy-going Northern Irishman says he has already sparred with Woods over a potential rivalry. McIlroy, winner of the British Open, WGC-Bridgestone Invitational and PGA Championship in his last three starts, spent a day earlier this week with fellow Nike spokesman Woods in the New York area. The due were promoting some new irons and also appeared on a late-night talk show ahead of The Barclays, which opens the FedExCup playoffs starting on Thursday.

  • Has Earth's Missing Heat Been Found?
    Has Earth's Missing Heat Been Found?

    In 1999, the feverish rise in Earth's surface temperatures suddenly slowed, even as greenhouse gas emissions escalated. This unexpected slowdown has been called a global warming hiatus or global warming pause. Most climate scientists don't think this hiatus means global warming went kaput, but the reason (or reasons) for the slowdown has scientists flummoxed. Now, a study published today (Aug. 21) in the journal Science suggests a natural climate cycle in the North Atlantic Ocean gobbled Earth's extra heat.

  • Robin Williams' ashes scattered in San Francisco Bay
    Robin Williams' ashes scattered in San Francisco Bay

    Comedian Robin Williams' ashes have been scattered in the San Francisco Bay following his apparent suicide, according to a death certificate released by Marin County on Thursday. Williams, 63, was found hanged in his Tiburon, California, home last week. The "Mrs. Doubtfire" star had been suffering from severe depression, anxiety and early Parkinson's disease before his death. Williams' cremated remains were released on Aug. 12, the day after his death, according to the document.

  • Exclusive: Militants, weapons transit Gaza tunnels despite Egyptian crackdown

    AL-SARSOURIYA Egypt (Reuters) - A third of the houses on the main street of this Bedouin town near Egypt's border with Gaza look derelict, but inside they buzz with the activity of tunnel smugglers scrambling to survive a security crackdown by the Egyptian army. While tunnels used by Gaza's dominant Hamas militants to infiltrate Israel were a priority target of an Israeli offensive in the Palestinian enclave this summer, many smuggling conduits into Egypt have skirted detection. "During the Gaza war, business has flourished," said a Bedouin guide who gave Reuters access to one of the tunnels and a rare look at how the illicit, lucrative industry has evolved since Egypt began trying to root out the passages in 2012.

  • The ice bucket stops with Obama

    EDGARTOWN, Mass. (AP) — The ice bucket stops with Obama.

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