The Sideshow
  • Brave? Or a wee bit foolish? Definitely lucky.

    While visiting the Phu Luang Wildlife Sanctuary in Thailand, Tor Bowling, 27, came nose-to-trunk with a charging elephant and lived to tell the tale. The story was first reported by the New York Daily News.

    The elephant charges Bowling, who — amazingly — doesn't so much as flinch. Instead he raises his hand as if to say, "Hold it right there, Jumbo." The elephant does exactly that, putting on the brakes before trampling the tourist. The beast then retreats back into the trees,

    We think it's safe to assume that most people in the same situation would either scream, run or curl up into a ball and pray for a quick death. Bowling clearly isn't most people. He turns to the person filming the clip and gives a smile and a chuckle, like the entire thing was no big deal. Don't play chicken with this guy — you will lose.

    Bowling told the Daily News that he chose to see the experience as a positive. "I always think (everything that happens to me) is

    Read More »from Man stops charging elephant with a wave of his hand
  • And you thought human beings had odd mating rituals. A 2012 video that's going viral shows the amazing courtship dance between two Galapagos albatrosses. 

    The dance is truly a sight to behold. Two birds face each other, bow their necks, peck at each other's beaks, honk loudly, lock their jaws and strut around in circles like a '70s-era John Travolta at a Brooklyn disco.

    The clip was filmed by Phillip Nails while visiting the Galapagos Islands several years ago with his parents. In the background, you can hear the gasps and chuckles of the delighted onlookers. To their credit, the albatrosses keep their composure despite the vocal audience. These two lovebirds have eyes only for each other.

    While the ritual might look a little silly, it's a sign of real devotion between the birds. The courtship dance is something that occurs when the birds return to the Galapagos each year after spending months at sea, the BBC explains. The birds, who mate for life and can live 50 years, track each

    Read More »from Video captures the amazing mating dance of the Galapagos albatross
  • Santa Clara University (Wikimedia Commons)Santa Clara University (Wikimedia Commons)

    Like nearly all job postings, the ad seeking applicants for a quarterly adjunct lecturer position at Santa Clara University's English Department lists some desired skills and requirements.

    But forget about "must have basic knowledge of Microsoft Excel" or "excellent interpersonal skills are key" — the qualifications sought for this posting were as specific as they were over-the-top.

    According to the posting, the successful applicant should have published “at least 25 books on topics ranging from the history of Silicon Valley to the biography of microprocessing to interviews with entrepreneurs." Hmm, OK. What else? "E-books on topics such as home life in the US, home life in the UK, and water conservation.” 

    And the list goes on: The successful applicant should have a history of being "an editor of Forbes ASAP or a weekly columnist for ABC.com." Oh, and one last thing: He or she also needs to have experience hosting "television and radio productions for PBS, cable television, and ABC."

    Read More »from Have you published 25 books? You might be qualified to teach at Santa Clara U.

Pagination

(2,381 Stories)
  • Hong Kong protests hit China's National Day: Live Report
    Hong Kong protests hit China's National Day: Live Report

    Hong Kong (AFP) - 07:38 GMT - 'We are not Tibet or Xinjiang' - Edward Chin, a financier and prominent Occupy organiser, is in bullish mood today. He's been speaking to AFP reporter Annabel Symington and believes the police know violence would lead to a backlash from the Hong Kong public.

  • Mexico announces homicide charges in army killings
    Mexico announces homicide charges in army killings

    Three soldiers have been charged with homicide in the June killings of 22 suspected gang members in southern Mexico, Attorney General Jesus Murillo Karam announced on Tuesday.

  • Ukrainians gear up for winter without Russian gas
    Ukrainians gear up for winter without Russian gas

    KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — For Alexei Polezhai, who sells water heaters and wood-burning stoves at his two shops in Kiev, sales this fall have been remarkably good considering the dramatic collapse in the rest of the Ukrainian economy this year.

  • Qantas puts world's largest plane on longest route
    Qantas puts world's largest plane on longest route

    FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Qantas is putting the world's biggest passenger plane on the world's longest airline route.

  • Coalition jets strike Islamic State near Turkish border: Kurdish sources

    By Ayla Jean Yackley MURSITPINAR Turkey (Reuters) - U.S.-led forces launched air strikes on Islamic State fighters who are besieging a Kurdish town near the Syrian border with Turkey on Wednesday, Kurdish sources in the town and a monitoring group said, a rare daylight coalition attack. A Reuters correspondent on the Turkish side of the border could hear jets overhead and saw a column of black smoke rising into the sky from the southeast of the town. ...

  • Court mulls legality of firing for pot use off job
    Court mulls legality of firing for pot use off job

    DENVER (AP) — Pot may be legal in Colorado, but you can still be fired for using it.

  • Jihadists free 70 kidnapped children in Syria: monitor
    Jihadists free 70 kidnapped children in Syria: monitor

    Beirut (AFP) - The Islamic State jihadist group on Tuesday freed more than 70 Kurdish school children its fighters kidnapped in northern Syria in May, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

  • Hundreds of Thousands Face Health Law Subsidy Deadline
    Hundreds of Thousands Face Health Law Subsidy Deadline

    WASHINGTON—Hundreds of thousands of Americans face a Tuesday deadline to verify their income and are at risk of losing or having to pay back their federal health-insurance subsidies under the Affordable Care Act. The need for people to pay back the government could become a headache during next year's tax season, when Americans are expected to pay back any subsidies they weren't eligible for. The Obama administration has told more than 300,000 individuals who obtained coverage through the federal HealthCare.gov site that they may lose some or all of the subsidies if they don't provide additional income information that jibes with Internal Revenue Service data. Hundreds of thousands of people who obtained health coverage through state exchanges also have documentation issues and could potentially be getting subsidies they aren't eligible for.

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