The Sideshow
  • Brave? Or a wee bit foolish? Definitely lucky.

    While visiting the Phu Luang Wildlife Sanctuary in Thailand, Tor Bowling, 27, came nose-to-trunk with a charging elephant and lived to tell the tale. The story was first reported by the New York Daily News.

    The elephant charges Bowling, who — amazingly — doesn't so much as flinch. Instead he raises his hand as if to say, "Hold it right there, Jumbo." The elephant does exactly that, putting on the brakes before trampling the tourist. The beast then retreats back into the trees,

    We think it's safe to assume that most people in the same situation would either scream, run or curl up into a ball and pray for a quick death. Bowling clearly isn't most people. He turns to the person filming the clip and gives a smile and a chuckle, like the entire thing was no big deal. Don't play chicken with this guy — you will lose.

    Bowling told the Daily News that he chose to see the experience as a positive. "I always think (everything that happens to me) is

    Read More »from Man stops charging elephant with a wave of his hand
  • And you thought human beings had odd mating rituals. A 2012 video that's going viral shows the amazing courtship dance between two Galapagos albatrosses. 

    The dance is truly a sight to behold. Two birds face each other, bow their necks, peck at each other's beaks, honk loudly, lock their jaws and strut around in circles like a '70s-era John Travolta at a Brooklyn disco.

    The clip was filmed by Phillip Nails while visiting the Galapagos Islands several years ago with his parents. In the background, you can hear the gasps and chuckles of the delighted onlookers. To their credit, the albatrosses keep their composure despite the vocal audience. These two lovebirds have eyes only for each other.

    While the ritual might look a little silly, it's a sign of real devotion between the birds. The courtship dance is something that occurs when the birds return to the Galapagos each year after spending months at sea, the BBC explains. The birds, who mate for life and can live 50 years, track each

    Read More »from Video captures the amazing mating dance of the Galapagos albatross
  • Santa Clara University (Wikimedia Commons)Santa Clara University (Wikimedia Commons)

    Like nearly all job postings, the ad seeking applicants for a quarterly adjunct lecturer position at Santa Clara University's English Department lists some desired skills and requirements.

    But forget about "must have basic knowledge of Microsoft Excel" or "excellent interpersonal skills are key" — the qualifications sought for this posting were as specific as they were over-the-top.

    According to the posting, the successful applicant should have published “at least 25 books on topics ranging from the history of Silicon Valley to the biography of microprocessing to interviews with entrepreneurs." Hmm, OK. What else? "E-books on topics such as home life in the US, home life in the UK, and water conservation.” 

    And the list goes on: The successful applicant should have a history of being "an editor of Forbes ASAP or a weekly columnist for ABC.com." Oh, and one last thing: He or she also needs to have experience hosting "television and radio productions for PBS, cable television, and ABC."

    Read More »from Have you published 25 books? You might be qualified to teach at Santa Clara U.

Pagination

(2,381 Stories)
  • Frances McDormand: 'I’m happy with the way I look and how I age'
    Frances McDormand: 'I’m happy with the way I look and how I age'

    HBO strikes again. This Sunday, the network premieres "Olive Kitteridge," a two-part miniseries based on Elizabeth Strout's Pulitzer Prize-winning collection of short stories about residents in a small town in Maine. Dubbed a "traumedy" by director Lisa Cholodenko, the screen version features Frances McDormand as Olive, the retired math teacher with a dysfunctional marriage and a son who, like her, suffers from depression.

  • The State Department is too top-heavy with Obama political picks, says foreign service group
    The State Department is too top-heavy with Obama political picks, says foreign service group

    At a time when "The world is a mess," President Barack Obama has packed too many political appointees into top jobs at the State Department, and should replace retiring Deputy Secretary of State William Burns with a career diplomat, a foreign service group warns.

  • Wal-Mart to expand discounts as retail price war heats up

    (Reuters) - Wal-Mart Stores Inc said it will expand its offering of discounted products during the holiday season and may broaden a price-matching scheme to include online rivals, in the latest sign of an escalating price war among big U.S. retailers. Wal-Mart said it was bracing for competition to be as tough or tougher than in 2013, when heavy discounting depressed earnings across the industry. Wal-Mart's profits dropped in the holiday quarter last year and it has posted six straight quarters of flat or declining same-store sales. ...

  • Miley & Rihanna Stun With Racy Red Carpet Looks!
    Miley & Rihanna Stun With Racy Red Carpet Looks!

    Miley Cyrus & Rihanna left little to the imagination on Wednesday when they hit the red carpet in very revealing looks.

  • Muslim men over 50 pray at Jerusalem's Aqsa mosque amid tight security

    By Luke Baker JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Muslim men over 50 prayed at the Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem's Old City on Friday amid intense security, a day after Israel closed all access to the sacred compound for the first time in more than a decade following violence on the streets. More than 1,000 Israeli police were deployed around the Old City's cobbled streets and the ancient gates that lead to Al Aqsa, a spokeswoman said, in addition to undercover anti-riot units and observation balloons hovering in the sky. ...

  • Thousands denounce HSBC board member's likening of Hong Kong people to freed slaves

    By Anne Marie Roantree and Lisa Jucca HONG KONG (Reuters) - Thousands have signed an online petition denouncing reported comments by an HSBC Holdings board member in which she likened Hong Kong protesters' demands for democracy to the emancipation of slaves. Laura Cha, who is also a member of Hong Kong's policy-making Executive Council, chairwoman of the city's Financial Services Development Council and a member of China's parliament, was quoted as making the comments at an event in Paris. "American slaves were liberated in 1861 but did not get voting rights until 107 years later. ...

  • Iran talks should weigh fatwas on nuclear arms: US bishops
    Iran talks should weigh fatwas on nuclear arms: US bishops

    Less than a month before a deadline to reach a nuclear deal with Iran, US Catholic bishops are urging negotiators not to underestimate the power of fatwas by Islamic leaders banning atomic weapons. In a ground-breaking visit, a six-strong delegation from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) travelled in April to the holy city of Qom to meet with top Shiite leaders in a bid to bridge gaps between Iran and the West. "Iranians feel profoundly misunderstood by America and the West," said Bishop Richard Pates, the chairman of the USCCB's committee on international justice and peace, speaking publicly about the trip on Wednesday. As the West seeks to negotiate a deal by November 24 to rein in Iran's suspect nuclear program, the USCCB delegation argued Washington, in particular, should pay more heed to Iranian assertions that stockpiling and using nuclear weapons would be against the fundamental principles of Shiite Islam.

  • Meet the slimmest, sexiest smartphone you’ll never own
    Meet the slimmest, sexiest smartphone you’ll never own

    When it comes to smartphones, thin is in. Apple’s iPhone 6 wowed consumers when it was unveiled last month and it measured just 6.9mm thick. The phone feels incredible in the hand thanks to its slender profile, but a new smartphone just announced on Wednesday makes Apple’s latest iPhone look positively plump. DON’T MISS: Preview: Hands on with the most surprising phone of the year, Motorola’s Droid Turbo China-based smartphone maker Oppo isn’t a well-known brand in the United States or in many other major smartphone markets. The company has been building impressive handset for many years, however, and on Wednesday it showed off its latest and greatest devices to tech bloggers and journalists. Among the new phones it debuted was the Oppo

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