The Sideshow
  • Brave? Or a wee bit foolish? Definitely lucky.

    While visiting the Phu Luang Wildlife Sanctuary in Thailand, Tor Bowling, 27, came nose-to-trunk with a charging elephant and lived to tell the tale. The story was first reported by the New York Daily News.

    The elephant charges Bowling, who — amazingly — doesn't so much as flinch. Instead he raises his hand as if to say, "Hold it right there, Jumbo." The elephant does exactly that, putting on the brakes before trampling the tourist. The beast then retreats back into the trees,

    We think it's safe to assume that most people in the same situation would either scream, run or curl up into a ball and pray for a quick death. Bowling clearly isn't most people. He turns to the person filming the clip and gives a smile and a chuckle, like the entire thing was no big deal. Don't play chicken with this guy — you will lose.

    Bowling told the Daily News that he chose to see the experience as a positive. "I always think (everything that happens to me) is

    Read More »from Man stops charging elephant with a wave of his hand
  • And you thought human beings had odd mating rituals. A 2012 video that's going viral shows the amazing courtship dance between two Galapagos albatrosses. 

    The dance is truly a sight to behold. Two birds face each other, bow their necks, peck at each other's beaks, honk loudly, lock their jaws and strut around in circles like a '70s-era John Travolta at a Brooklyn disco.

    The clip was filmed by Phillip Nails while visiting the Galapagos Islands several years ago with his parents. In the background, you can hear the gasps and chuckles of the delighted onlookers. To their credit, the albatrosses keep their composure despite the vocal audience. These two lovebirds have eyes only for each other.

    While the ritual might look a little silly, it's a sign of real devotion between the birds. The courtship dance is something that occurs when the birds return to the Galapagos each year after spending months at sea, the BBC explains. The birds, who mate for life and can live 50 years, track each

    Read More »from Video captures the amazing mating dance of the Galapagos albatross
  • Santa Clara University (Wikimedia Commons)Santa Clara University (Wikimedia Commons)

    Like nearly all job postings, the ad seeking applicants for a quarterly adjunct lecturer position at Santa Clara University's English Department lists some desired skills and requirements.

    But forget about "must have basic knowledge of Microsoft Excel" or "excellent interpersonal skills are key" — the qualifications sought for this posting were as specific as they were over-the-top.

    According to the posting, the successful applicant should have published “at least 25 books on topics ranging from the history of Silicon Valley to the biography of microprocessing to interviews with entrepreneurs." Hmm, OK. What else? "E-books on topics such as home life in the US, home life in the UK, and water conservation.” 

    And the list goes on: The successful applicant should have a history of being "an editor of Forbes ASAP or a weekly columnist for ABC.com." Oh, and one last thing: He or she also needs to have experience hosting "television and radio productions for PBS, cable television, and ABC."

    Read More »from Have you published 25 books? You might be qualified to teach at Santa Clara U.

Pagination

(2,381 Stories)
  • NYSE stocks posting largest percentage decreases

    A look at the 10 biggest percentage decliners on New York Stock Exchange at the close of trading: La-Z-Boy Inc. fell 6.4 percent to $21.74. SandRidge Permian Trust fell 5.3 percent to $10.81. Chegg Inc. ...

  • Who is Steven Sotloff, the other U.S. journalist being held by ISIL?
    Who is Steven Sotloff, the other U.S. journalist being held by ISIL?

    The family of Steven Sotloff — believed to be the person who appears at the end of an Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant video showing the beheading of fellow American journalist James Foley — is asking the White House to do everything it can to free him.

  • Holder says he understands mistrust of police
    Holder says he understands mistrust of police

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — Attorney General Eric Holder sought Wednesday to reassure the people of Ferguson about the investigation into Michael Brown's death and said he understands why many black Americans do not trust police, recalling how he was repeatedly stopped by officers who seemed to target him because of his race.

  • Justin Bieber Resumes Timeless Love Affair with Selena Gomez
    Justin Bieber Resumes Timeless Love Affair with Selena Gomez

    Today in celebrity gossip: Everybody's favorite on-again, off-again romance is back on, plus Jennifer Lawrence is dating Chris Martin, and Lindsay Lohan denies James Franco's claims about her character. Their seemingly neverending on-again-off-again relationship has suddenly flipped back to the "ON" position as TMZ reports the two spent this past weekend together. See, their stony mutual silence had ended last week when the two up and went to church together, and then went on to do other "wholesome things like hiking and hanging out at home." TMZ also adds that the pair have "already started calling each other boyfriend and girlfriend again." You're probably already asking yourself, "Is this the time it finally clicks? Will Justin Bieber and Selena Gomez be together forever from now on?" At the risk of being too presumptuous, yes.

  • HP in better position now to make acquisitions: CEO

    Hewlett-Packard Co is in a better position today to make acquisitions than in the past year, given its $4.7 billion in net cash and as it evaluates its overall cloud software capability, Chief Executive Officer Meg Whitman said in an interview. "we're in a position to make acquisitions the way we weren't over the past year," she said.

  • US warns travelers of canceled Venezuela flights
    US warns travelers of canceled Venezuela flights

    CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Come to Venezuela and you might get a longer trip than you bargained for.

  • Grouper Eats Shark in One Bite in Viral Video
    Grouper Eats Shark in One Bite in Viral Video

    With Shark Week on the Discovery Channel just ending, it's understandable that you may have the carnivorous fish on the mind and think that such a dangerous predator should be avoided at all costs. A certain grouper clearly didn't think so. In this video, which was featured on the front page of Reddit, we see the two fish circling each other right before the 4-foot shark gets caught on a fisherman's line.

  • Tire makers race to turn dandelions into rubber
    Tire makers race to turn dandelions into rubber

    By Ludwig Burger MUENSTER Germany (Reuters) - Dutch biologist Ingrid van der Meer often meets with disbelief when she talks about her work on dandelions and how it could secure the future of road transport. The reaction is understandable, given most people regard the yellow flowers as pesky intruders in their gardens rather than a promising source of rubber for tires. Her research team is competing with others across the world to breed a type of dandelion native to Kazakhstan whose taproot yields a milky fluid with tire-grade rubber particles in it. Global tire makers such as industry leader Bridgestone Corp and No.4 player Continental AG believe they are in for rich pickings and are backing such research to the tune of millions of dollars.

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