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Have an iPhone? You'll recognize this tune.

Adi Iyer’s iPhone dance track

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Adi Iyer’s iPhone dance track

Adi Iyer’s iPhone dance track
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Adi Iyer (aka MetroGnome) has a gift for crafting catchy dance tracks out of unusual source material. His latest tune uses some beats that anybody with an iPhone (or anyone who lives with somebody who does) will no doubt recognize.

Iyer told Yahoo News that it took him about a week to compose and finalize the song structure. He practiced his performance for the video for five days, going 10 hours per day nonstop. "Sometimes I'll make it all the way to the finish line, and suddenly I'll smile or make a weird face because I'm so excited, and completely mess up." The one that made the cut was his 70th take.

Iyer said he used three main ringtones from Apple's device. Listen closely and you'll hear the Opening (Default) sound, the Marimba, and the Xylophone. "I also used 'Harp', the SMS tone, the most deadly iPhone alarm/siren sound that wakes up the whole neighborhood, and the Siri tone."

The Internet is known for inspiring negative feedback, but Iyer said that so far, he's received nothing but love. Well, almost. He said he did get some hate mail "from one guy who strictly hates Apple products" but he's heard from a lot more people who tell him they've adopted his tune as their new ringtone.

Iyer, who also composed a dance track from the "Breaking Bad" theme, said he came up with the iPhone idea while "trying to think about a remix idea that literally everyone could relate to." He thought about TV shows, movies and popular songs, but wanted "something different and outside the box." Then  guess what  his phone rang.

"The main reason why I remixed these ringtones, just like any of my previously remixed tracks, was that I became sick and tired of listening to them (except for the 'Breaking Bad' theme). I usually remix a track because it's so catchy and so annoying at the same time. It doesn't mean that my remix wouldn't eventually become annoying, but at least it's a different perspective on an existing track."

Follow Mike Krumboltz on Twitter (@mikekrumboltz)

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