The Sideshow

See the moment a physicist learns his life's work on the Big Bang theory is valid, pops open Champagne

The Sideshow

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The Moment A Physicist Is Told The Theory He Devoted His Life To Is Finally Proven

The Moment A Physicist Is Told The Theory He Devoted His Life To Is Finally Proven

The Moment A Physicist Is Told The Theory He Devoted His Life To Is Finally Proven

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The Moment A Physicist Is Told The Theory He Devoted His Life To Is Finally Proven

The Moment A Physicist Is Told The Theory He Devoted His Life To Is Finally Proven
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If there's ever a time that calls for Champagne, it's the moment you learn that your 30-year-old theory of how the universe began has finally been backed up with scientific evidence.

On the heels of Monday's news that astronomers had found the "smoking gun" of evidence that supports the Big Bang theory comes this amazing video.

Stanford Assistant Professor Chao-Lin Kuo went to visit Professor Andrei Linde with new evidence that supports Linde's cosmic inflation theory. What is cosmic inflation theory? Addressing the camera, Kuo explains, "Inflation is the theory about the 'bang' of 'Big Bang.' It explains why we have all this stuff in the universe."

You see, gravity waves in the universe's oldest light show that the universe expanded to 100 trillion times its size almost 14 billion years ago — all in less than a second. Those waves have been described as the first tremors in the Big Bang. Duh.

Kuo approaches Linde's house for a surprise visit to deliver the news that the Stanford team has found data that confirm Linde's theory. Kuo knocks on the door, tells Linde and his wife, professor Renata Kallosh, the incredible news.

“I have a surprise for you,” Kuo says. “It’s five-sigma, at .2.” Linde can hardly believe his ears, and asks to hear the news again. And then for a third time.

And then, the celebration begins. You don't have to be a genius physicist to see the joy on their faces.

Full disclosure — the people in this video are incredibly brilliant, and we have no earthly idea what they're talking about. Our knowledge of space began and ended with the destruction of the second Death Star. Nevertheless, the emotions on display are universal.

Follow Mike Krumboltz on Twitter (@mikekrumboltz).

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