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Woman spends $10,000 on invisible art, hopes she doesn’t lose it

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Non-existent masterpieces can cost just as much as real ones

Being an art lover can turn into an expensive endeavor, but to lay down some cold hard cash on works that don't even exist is pushing the bounds of art appreciation to its breaking point. New media aficionado Aimee Davison doesn't quite share that same viewpoint and she used her bank account to show it, spending $10,000 on a piece of non-existent artwork from the Museum of Non-Visible Art (MONA).

The MONA project is the work of artist duo Brainard and Delia Carey, along with actor James Franco. You might remember the intrepid trio launching a Kickstarter fundraising effort for the mythical museum last month. The most expensive item available for purchase from MONA was a $10,000 work titled Fresh Air, which is now the property of Ms. Davison.

The work is described as such: "This is a unique piece, only this one is for sale. The air you are purchasing is like buying an endless tank of oxygen. No matter where you are, you always have the ability to take a breath of the most delicious, clean-smelling air that the earth can produce. Every breath you take gives you endless peace and health. This artwork is something to carry with you if you own it. Because wherever you are, you can imagine yourself getting the most beautiful taste of air that is from the mountain tops or fields or from the ocean side; it is an endless supply."

For her hefty donation to the lofty concept, Davison will be awarded a simple display card which explains the idea behind the art, and nothing more. Counting the sizable contribution, MONA has raised a total of $13,442. The artists have plans to take their phantom works on a tour of the U.S. and Europe, though no concrete date has been revealed.

(Source)

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