• Final Glance: Railroad companies

    Shares of some top railroad companies were down at the close of trading: CSX fell $.21 or .7 percent, to $30.52. Canadian National Railway Co. fell $.77 or 1.1 percent, to $67.58. Canadian Pacific Railway ...

  • SC mom's arrest sparks child care debate
    SC mom's arrest sparks child care debate

    NORTH AUGUSTA, S.C. (AP) — Plenty of working parents can relate to the dilemma Debra Harrell faced when her 9-year-old daughter asked to play unsupervised in a park this summer. How do you find the time and money for child care when school is out?

  • Special Report: Where Ukraine's separatists get their weapons
    Special Report: Where Ukraine's separatists get their weapons

    By Thomas Grove and Warren Strobel DONETSK Ukraine (Reuters) - On the last day of May, a surface-to-air rocket was signed out of a military base near Moscow where it had been stored for more than 20 years.     According to the ornate Cyrillic handwriting in the weapon's Russian Defence Ministry logbook, seen by Reuters, the portable rocket, for use with an Igla rocket launcher, was destined for a base in Rostov, some 50 km (31 miles) from the Ukrainian border. In that area, say U.S. officials, lies a camp for training Ukrainian separatist fighters.     Three weeks later the rocket and its logbook turned up in eastern Ukraine, where government troops seized them from pro-Russian separatists. The seal of the Russian Defence Ministry has been stamped over the signature sending the weapon to Rostov.     A copy of the log was passed to a diplomat in Ukraine’s capital, Kiev. Reuters was unable to verify its authenticity with the Russian military, and Moscow has consistently denied arming the separatists in eastern Ukraine.    The Igla and its logbook are just one indication that weapons are flowing from Russia into Ukraine.

  • Rocket blasts off with U.S. ‘neighborhood watch’ spy satellites
    Rocket blasts off with U.S. ‘neighborhood watch’ spy satellites

    An unmanned Delta 4 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Monday with a pair of U.S. military satellites designed to keep watch on other countries’ spacecraft. The 206-foot (63-meter) tall rocket, built by United Launch Alliance, a partnership of Lockheed Martin and Boeing, lifted off at 7:28 p.m. EDT and blazed through partly cloudy skies as it headed into orbit, a United Launch Alliance live webcast showed. Launch of two satellites for the U.S. Air Force’s recently declassified Geosynchronous Space Situational Awareness Program, or GSSAP, had been slated for July 23, but was delayed one day to resolve a technical issue with ground support equipment and then three more times by poor weather. Once in orbit, the GSSAP satellites, built by Orbital Sciences Corp, will drift above and below a 22,300-mile (35,970-km) high zone that houses most of the world's communications satellites and other spacecraft.

  • After shaky start, Ukraine turns eastern offensive around
    After shaky start, Ukraine turns eastern offensive around

    When Ukraine's military offensive to oust pro-Russian rebels from the restive east began in mid-April with humiliated soldiers meekly surrendering their armoured vehicles it looked doomed to failure. Analysts say the dramatic turnaround is down to a combination of growing professionalism and ruthlessness from Kiev's forces on the one hand and the shifting nature of the support that Russia is giving the rebels. "The Ukrainian army is finding out how to fight as it goes along and has shown how capable it is of learning," said Valentyn Badrak, director of the Research Centre for the Army, Demilitarisation and Disarmament in Kiev. Poorly coordinated, riddled by corruption and low on morale after the humbling loss of Crimea to Russia in March, Ukraine's military has undergone a radical shakeup after drafting highly motivated volunteers and improving its leadership.

  • With Israel at war, US lawmakers give full support
    With Israel at war, US lawmakers give full support

    WASHINGTON (AP) — While much of the rest of the world watches the Gaza war in horror and scrambles for a cease-fire, U.S. lawmakers are pressing the Obama administration to take no action that puts pressure on Israel to halt its military operations.

  • The 20% market correction has already started
    The 20% market correction has already started

    The headlines don’t reflect it yet but according to Brad Lamensdorf a 10 to 20% correction isn’t just possible, but has actually already started.

  • AP ANALYSIS: Amid war, endgames in Gaza emerge
    AP ANALYSIS: Amid war, endgames in Gaza emerge

    TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — The savage fighting between Israel and Hamas is escalating in Gaza, cease-fire efforts take on elements of farce, and bravado rules the public discourse. But even through the fog of war, a few endgame scenarios can nonetheless be glimpsed.

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