• Visitors gather around President Barack Obama, center, during his visit to Arlington on Memorial Day 2013. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)The war in Iraq is over, everybody knows that. “I promised to end the war in Iraq—and I did” was one of President Barack Obama’s best-received stump speech applause lines last year.

    Except it’s not. First, most obviously, because bombings and other acts of violence have killed more than 2,000 people there this year, as detailed in this amazing Agence France-Presse analysis. Pressed on that point last year by Yahoo News, White House press secretary Jay Carney said: "The president promised to responsibly end our war in Iraq, the United States military operation in Iraq. He did that and our troops came home."

    Except that "our war" isn't technically over either: The "Authorization for Use of Military Force" in Iraq, signed into law on Oct. 16, 2002, is still the law of the land. (H/t to independent national-security writer Marcy Wheeler, who follows this issue—and many others—closely.)

    Republican Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky is expected to offer legislation this year to repeal the Iraq AUMF.

    Read More »from Congress struggles with ending the war in Afghanistan … and in Iraq?
  • White House doesn’t have ‘figure on costs’ of Africa trip

    Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly identified the president's birthplace.

    President Barack Obama makes the first extended trip to Africa of his presidency next week—but he won't be stopping in his ancestral homeland.

    Obama's weeklong trip—June 26-July 3—which he's taking with his wife, Michelle, and daughters Sasha and Malia, as well as with members of his economic and trade team, is to signal America's interest in trade, democracy and economic development in Africa. He will visit Senegal, South Africa and Tanzania.

    "We see Africa as one of the most important emerging regions in the world," deputy national security adviser for strategic communications Ben Rhodes told reporters on a conference call Friday. He added that the administration sees "growing economic opportunities [in the continent] for increased trade and investment" by U.S. businesses.

    The trip will also focus on "democracy and democratic institution-building," Rhodes said.

    Rhodes acknowledged the

    Read More »from White House doesn’t have ‘figure on costs’ of Africa trip
  • The top 9,486 ways Jay Carney won’t answer your questions (interactive)

    White House Press Secretary Jay Carney (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

    Jay Carney doesn’t have an answer for that. He hasn’t discussed that subject with the president. He will refer you to the Department of [insert agency here]. He refuses to speculate on that. He’ll have to get back to you.

    But he appreciates the question.

    A Yahoo News analysis of the 444 briefings through June 18 that Carney has held since becoming White House press secretary has identified 13 distinct strains in the way he dodges reporters' question. Since Carney held his first daily briefing with reporters in the White House Brady Press Briefing Room on Feb. 16, 2011, for example, he’s used some variation of "I don’t have the answer" more than 1,900 times. In 1,383 cases he referred a question to someone else. But will he at least speculate on hypotheticals? No. In fact, he has refused to do so 525 times.

    In the following interactive, you can browse all 9,486 of Carney’s most-used responses and verbal crutches.

    The main function of a White House press secretary is to shape messaging

    Read More »from The top 9,486 ways Jay Carney won’t answer your questions (interactive)

Pagination

(7,168 Stories)
  • Brazilian Town Run by Women Is Looking for a Few Good (Single) Men
    Brazilian Town Run by Women Is Looking for a Few Good (Single) Men

    I'm sure many men have dreamed of an island completely populated by exotic women, available to fulfill their every desire. Of course, fantasy is fantasy, but what if it were reality? In a certain regard, it is — in Noiva do Cordeiro, Brazil. It's a scenic rural town in the hills outside of Belo Horizante with one big quirk, or perk, depending on whom you talk to. This Brazilian town is inhabited and governed almost entirely by women, its population consisting of more than 600 mostly single women aged 20 to 25. Sons are sent away at 18, and spouses are banned from the town except on weekends.

  • Your Top Plays for Today
    Your Top Plays for Today

    Your Top Plays for Today: AP's Sports Guide

  • Congressman Paul Ryan on immigration, Obamacare and the economy
    Congressman Paul Ryan on immigration, Obamacare and the economy

    Rep. Paul Ryan, republican of Wisconsin, talks with Yahoo Finance's Bianna Golodryga about why he believes the United States is on the wrong track, and what he would do to change that.

  • Comedian Jon Stewart Calls Out Sean Hannity’s White Privilege

    After unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot by a Ferguson, Mo., police officer Aug. 9, Fox News anchor Bill O'Reilly cut his vacation short to come back on the air and voice his outrage. The fury wasn't directed at the officer who killed Brown or the police departments that violently cracked down on protests after Brown's death but at the way the media had reported Brown's death. In this tirade against O'Reilly and other racism deniers, The Daily Show's Jon Stewart explains that if the truth about what happened in Ferguson is that a white police officer (Darren Wilson) shot a black teenager who was unarmed—despite what Ben Stein suggests, being a black man in America is not the same thing as carrying a weapon—then saying that a white police officer shot an unarmed black teenager is reporting the facts, not putting spin on the account.  

  • Sister of accused Boston marathon bombers arrested after bomb threat
    Sister of accused Boston marathon bombers arrested after bomb threat

    The sister of the accused Boston Marathon bombers was arrested in New York City for threatening a woman over the phone, saying she could "put a bomb on you," police said on Wednesday. Aliana Tsarnaev, 23, sister of Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was facing charges of aggravated harassment, a New York City Police Department spokesman said. Tsarnaev, of North Bergen, New Jersey, was accused of calling a woman in New York City's Harlem neighborhood and telling her "I have people that can go over there and put a bomb on you," the spokesman said. Her brothers are accused of killing three people and wounding more than 260 after detonating pressure-cooker bombs near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on April 15, 2013.

  • One of the iPhone 6’s most interesting new features just leaked for the first time
    One of the iPhone 6’s most interesting new features just leaked for the first time

    Apple’s next-generation iPhone 6 is now less than two weeks away from its official unveiling, if a report from a solid source and Tuesday’s big leak are to be believed. With the phone expected to launch the following week on September 19th, it makes sense that the components contained within the hotly anticipated handset are now leaking like crazy. Earlier this week, we saw a China-based cell phone parts retailer post a number of parts said to be destined for inclusion in either the iPhone 6 or the 5.5-inch iPhone phablet set to launch alongside or shortly after Apple’s flagship iPhone. Now, the retailer has added a different component that happens to be one of the iPhone 6’s most interesting new

  • Science just gave us another great reason to legalize pot
    Science just gave us another great reason to legalize pot

    We’ve learned about a couple of good medical benefits to marijuana this year and now it seems there’s another one: Using medicinal marijuana makes it less likely that you’ll become hooked on painkillers. CNN reports that a new study published this in the JAMA Internal Medicine journal finds that states that have legalized medicinal marijuana have significantly fewer deaths from painkiller overdoses. FROM EARLIER: Could pot be good for your heart? In all, the study found that states that had legalized medical pot experienced around 1,700 fewer painkiller overdose deaths in 2010 than what would have happened if those states didn’t make medical marijuana legal and available. “We found there was about a 25% lower rate of prescription painkiller overdose deaths on

  • It looks like Apple’s iWatch may come with a painful compromise
    It looks like Apple’s iWatch may come with a painful compromise

    Despite the fact that the iWatch represents Apple’s first dive into an “exciting new product category” since it unleashed the original iPad back in 2010, the new device isn’t Apple’s most hotly anticipated launch this fall. In fact, it likely falls into the No. 3 spot behind the 4.7-inch iPhone 6 and the 5.5-inch iPhone phablet. Consumers and investors alike are still waiting anxiously to see Apple’s take on wrist-worn wearables, but a new report suggests that the company may have been forced to forgo its typical no-compromise approach to mobile devices, and the result could be a big letdown for users. DisplaySearch analyst Charles Annis issued a note recently that explores some key issues surrounding Apple’s upcoming debut smartwatch. Considering the firm’s focus — displays

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