• Kanye West and Kim Kardashian (Getty Images)

    You probably didn't wake up this morning wondering what Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio thought about Kim Kardashian and Kanye West naming their new baby "North." (Congratulations! You're normal, unlike us.) Thankfully, talk radio host Andrea Tantaros asked Rubio about the celebrity couple's newborn on her show Friday.

    "You're probably only going to get this question from me today," Tantaros told Rubio during an interview. "Kanye West named his baby with Kim Kardashian 'North West.' Do you think that's a slight to Florida? Should they have named him 'South East?'"

    "Oh gosh, I guess we could just wait for another baby," Rubio said. "That's going to be an interesting birth certificate."

    Tantaros also congratulated Rubio on the Miami Heat's victory in the NBA Championship on Thursday night and asked if he partied hard with LeBron James the night before.

    "Oh no," Rubio said. "Those days are long gone."

    As our dedicated readers will recall, Rubio was once a regular on the Miami

    Read More »from Rubio weighs in on Kim Kardashian-Kanye West baby name
  • Syracuse University graduates at the 2012 commencement on May 13, 2012 at the Carrier Dome in Syracuse, New York. (Nate Shron/Getty Images)

    The Supreme Court is poised to release its opinion on an affirmative-action case that could forever change the way public colleges and universities consider race in admissions. But even if, as some predict, the justices issue a broad ruling slapping down the use of race in admissions, an open secret in higher education—that many colleges lower their admissions standards for male applicants—remains unchallenged and largely unremarked upon.

    For years, the percentage of men enrolled in college has been declining, with women making up nearly 57 percent of all undergrads at four-year colleges last year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. While schools are prohibited under the federal Title IX law from discriminating based on gender, some admissions officials have admitted in recent years that male applicants get a leg up from colleges hoping to avoid gender imbalances on campus.

    [Live chat: Awaiting key decisions from the Supreme Court]

    Jennifer Delahunty Britz, the dean of admissions at the private liberal arts school Kenyon College, was among the first to admit this when she wrote an op-ed titled "To All the Girls I've Rejected" in The New York Times in 2006.

    "The reality is that because young men are rarer, they're more valued applicants," she wrote, adding that two-thirds of colleges report that more women than men apply for admission. "What messages are we sending young women that they must, nearly 25 years after the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment, be even more accomplished than men to gain admission to the nation's top colleges?"

    Delahunty Britz's acknowledgment opened the floodgates, and reporters began looking closely at schools that admitted a much higher percentage of male than female applicants.

    Of course, these gaps don't necessarily mean that women are being discriminated against. It's possible that the male applicant pool is better qualified on average, though that's hard to ascertain when colleges generally resist releasing their admissions data.

    The University of Richmond, a private liberal arts school, acknowledged in 2009 that it attempts to keep its gender balance at about 50-50, which meant women's admit rate was about 13 percentage points lower than men's over the previous 10 years. Admissions officer Marilyn Hesser told CBS that men and women had about the same standardized test scores, but that male applicants' GPA was lower on average. (The college's admission rate suddenly became more gender neutral the following year, in 2010-2011, when men's acceptance rate was only 3 percentage points higher than women's.)

    The same year, the College of William and Mary, a public institution in Virginia, accepted 39.4 percent of its male applicants and 27.2 percent of female applicants. The school's admissions dean, Henry Broaddus, said men have slightly higher standardized test scores but lower GPAs than women, on average.

    Broaddus defended the policy, insisting that William and Mary's female students want the college to to be gender-balanced and that colleges in general risk becoming less attractive to both men and women when the gender balance tips too far toward women.

    "Even women who enroll ... expect to see men on campus," Broaddus said at the time. "It's not the College of Mary and Mary; it's the College of William and Mary."

    Read More »from As court prepares affirmative-action decision, softer standards for men go unnoticed
  • Christine Quinn said she received a message from Anthony Weiner on Thursday. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)Former Rep. Anthony Weiner called his New York City mayoral rival Christine Quinn on Thursday to clarify a recent discussion he had with a voter who reportedly used a homophobic slur to describe Quinn.

    Quinn, who is gay, told reporters on Friday she received a phone message from Weiner on Thursday after he came under fire for not strongly admonishing a voter he met during a campaign event who reportedly referred to Quinn as a “dyke.”

    The interaction, detailed in a Washington Post story, said Weiner did not scold the woman until after he noticed a reporter’s “incredulous reaction." Weiner then reportedly told the voter, who apologized, “It’s OK. It’s not your fault.”

    On Thursday, Weiner told reporters that he recalled admonishing the woman but insisted he did not recall any further interaction. He reaffirmed his support for gay rights and said he would not tolerate “any utterance of any type of slur against any community.”

    On Friday, Quinn said she was “grateful” that Weiner clarified

    Read More »from Weiner called Quinn to clarify talk with voter who used gay slur

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  • Pacquiao prods Mayweather with another tweet
    Pacquiao prods Mayweather with another tweet

    Philippine boxing legend Manny Pacquiao wants to give faithful fight fans a Christmas present -- the promise of a blockbuster world title face-off with Floyd Mayweather. The talk of the long-anticipated bout between the two gained steam in recent days, with Mayweather on Friday proposing a May 2 date and Pacquiao responding with a vow to chase him into submission. The two were long-time rivals as the "best pound-for-pound" boxers of their generation, but the dream fight has never materialized to the disappointment of the boxing world. Speaking to Showtime Sports in the US on Friday night, Mayweather, 37, said he wants his next fight to be against the Filipino star.

  • Curiosity Rover Drills Into Mars Rock, Finds Water
    Curiosity Rover Drills Into Mars Rock, Finds Water

    NASA's Curiosity rover is continuing to help scientists piece together the mystery of how Mars lost its surface water over the course of billions of years.

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