• Kanye West and Kim Kardashian (Getty Images)

    You probably didn't wake up this morning wondering what Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio thought about Kim Kardashian and Kanye West naming their new baby "North." (Congratulations! You're normal, unlike us.) Thankfully, talk radio host Andrea Tantaros asked Rubio about the celebrity couple's newborn on her show Friday.

    "You're probably only going to get this question from me today," Tantaros told Rubio during an interview. "Kanye West named his baby with Kim Kardashian 'North West.' Do you think that's a slight to Florida? Should they have named him 'South East?'"

    "Oh gosh, I guess we could just wait for another baby," Rubio said. "That's going to be an interesting birth certificate."

    Tantaros also congratulated Rubio on the Miami Heat's victory in the NBA Championship on Thursday night and asked if he partied hard with LeBron James the night before.

    "Oh no," Rubio said. "Those days are long gone."

    As our dedicated readers will recall, Rubio was once a regular on the Miami

    Read More »from Rubio weighs in on Kim Kardashian-Kanye West baby name
  • Syracuse University graduates at the 2012 commencement on May 13, 2012 at the Carrier Dome in Syracuse, New York. (Nate Shron/Getty Images)

    The Supreme Court is poised to release its opinion on an affirmative-action case that could forever change the way public colleges and universities consider race in admissions. But even if, as some predict, the justices issue a broad ruling slapping down the use of race in admissions, an open secret in higher education—that many colleges lower their admissions standards for male applicants—remains unchallenged and largely unremarked upon.

    For years, the percentage of men enrolled in college has been declining, with women making up nearly 57 percent of all undergrads at four-year colleges last year, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. While schools are prohibited under the federal Title IX law from discriminating based on gender, some admissions officials have admitted in recent years that male applicants get a leg up from colleges hoping to avoid gender imbalances on campus.

    [Live chat: Awaiting key decisions from the Supreme Court]

    Jennifer Delahunty Britz, the dean of admissions at the private liberal arts school Kenyon College, was among the first to admit this when she wrote an op-ed titled "To All the Girls I've Rejected" in The New York Times in 2006.

    "The reality is that because young men are rarer, they're more valued applicants," she wrote, adding that two-thirds of colleges report that more women than men apply for admission. "What messages are we sending young women that they must, nearly 25 years after the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment, be even more accomplished than men to gain admission to the nation's top colleges?"

    Delahunty Britz's acknowledgment opened the floodgates, and reporters began looking closely at schools that admitted a much higher percentage of male than female applicants.

    Of course, these gaps don't necessarily mean that women are being discriminated against. It's possible that the male applicant pool is better qualified on average, though that's hard to ascertain when colleges generally resist releasing their admissions data.

    The University of Richmond, a private liberal arts school, acknowledged in 2009 that it attempts to keep its gender balance at about 50-50, which meant women's admit rate was about 13 percentage points lower than men's over the previous 10 years. Admissions officer Marilyn Hesser told CBS that men and women had about the same standardized test scores, but that male applicants' GPA was lower on average. (The college's admission rate suddenly became more gender neutral the following year, in 2010-2011, when men's acceptance rate was only 3 percentage points higher than women's.)

    The same year, the College of William and Mary, a public institution in Virginia, accepted 39.4 percent of its male applicants and 27.2 percent of female applicants. The school's admissions dean, Henry Broaddus, said men have slightly higher standardized test scores but lower GPAs than women, on average.

    Broaddus defended the policy, insisting that William and Mary's female students want the college to to be gender-balanced and that colleges in general risk becoming less attractive to both men and women when the gender balance tips too far toward women.

    "Even women who enroll ... expect to see men on campus," Broaddus said at the time. "It's not the College of Mary and Mary; it's the College of William and Mary."

    Read More »from As court prepares affirmative-action decision, softer standards for men go unnoticed
  • Christine Quinn said she received a message from Anthony Weiner on Thursday. (Andrew Burton/Getty Images)Former Rep. Anthony Weiner called his New York City mayoral rival Christine Quinn on Thursday to clarify a recent discussion he had with a voter who reportedly used a homophobic slur to describe Quinn.

    Quinn, who is gay, told reporters on Friday she received a phone message from Weiner on Thursday after he came under fire for not strongly admonishing a voter he met during a campaign event who reportedly referred to Quinn as a “dyke.”

    The interaction, detailed in a Washington Post story, said Weiner did not scold the woman until after he noticed a reporter’s “incredulous reaction." Weiner then reportedly told the voter, who apologized, “It’s OK. It’s not your fault.”

    On Thursday, Weiner told reporters that he recalled admonishing the woman but insisted he did not recall any further interaction. He reaffirmed his support for gay rights and said he would not tolerate “any utterance of any type of slur against any community.”

    On Friday, Quinn said she was “grateful” that Weiner clarified

    Read More »from Weiner called Quinn to clarify talk with voter who used gay slur

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  • Social Media Erupts With Stunning Footage, Images of Volcano Blast
    Social Media Erupts With Stunning Footage, Images of Volcano Blast

    When was the last time you saw someone get up close and personal with a volcano? Probably never, except through the eyes of film fantasy, television documentaries, or the occasional adventure video game. Shifting all fantasy aside, take a look at some impressive images and video of a volcano in action.

  • Miley Cyrus Is Not Wearing Clothes On Her Latest Magazine Cover
    Miley Cyrus Is Not Wearing Clothes On Her Latest Magazine Cover

    Miley Cyrus usually looks like she’s not wearing any clothes, but on the upcoming issue of V Magazine she is actually not wearing any clothes. She’s naked on top of a pile of stuffed animals on the magazine’s “Rebel Issue,” shot by Karl Lagerfeld, and the concept of it fits Miley perfectly.

  • Adopted Pit Bull Saves Little Boy’s Life [VIDEO]
    Adopted Pit Bull Saves Little Boy’s Life [VIDEO]

    When a little boy stepped on a bee nest Tuesday and was hit by a swarm of bees, his family’s adopted pit bull dragged him to safety. Jesse-Cole, 8, his sister Jasmine, 17, and seven other kids were playing in a creek behind their Oregon apartment complex when someone stepped on a rotten log and unleashed a dangerous swarm of bees, Fox 12 Oregon reports. The other kids quickly climbed up the steep embankment to safety, but Jesse-Cole, who was stung at least 24 times, was unable to make it. He and his sister Jasmine, who is allergic and was injected twice with an EpiPen were taken to the hospital.

  • UK raises alert level as Syria refugees top 3 million
    UK raises alert level as Syria refugees top 3 million

    Britain raised its terror alert level Friday over fears of possible jihadist attacks as the United Nations said the number of refugees from the Syria conflict now tops three million. British Prime Minister David Cameron told reporters there was "no doubt in my mind" that jihadists from the Islamic State (IS) group in Iraq and Syria had their sights set on targets in Europe. Despite the move, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Washington had no plans to follow suit, but US national security officials had been in close contact with London on the issue. US President Barack Obama has admitted that he has no immediate strategy to tackle advancing IS jihadists.

  • Actor arrested with Jackie Chan's son released
    Actor arrested with Jackie Chan's son released

    BEIJING (AP) — A Taiwanese actor arrested on drug charges along with the son of Hong Kong film star Jackie Chan was released Friday after two weeks in detention, amid a broad anti-drug crackdown in China's capital that has ensnared several celebrities.

  • Time running out for 'kidnapped' brain tumour boy taken to France
    Time running out for 'kidnapped' brain tumour boy taken to France

    A frantic police hunt was underway Saturday for a five-year-old boy with a brain tumour taken from a British hospital by his family, as fears for his life intensified with every passing hour. Ashya King's parents took him Thursday from a hospital in the British south coast city of Southampton without doctors' consent and boarded a ferry to the French port of Cherbourg. It is not known why Brett King, 51, and Naghemeh King, 45, took their son. While they are Jehovah's Witnesses, the movement said Friday there was no indication their decision was motivated by religious convictions.

  • Pentagon says Iraq operations costing on average $7.5 million per day
    Pentagon says Iraq operations costing on average $7.5 million per day

    Rear Admiral John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, told a briefing the expense of U.S. He did not offer an estimate of the Pentagon's total costs so far, but an average cost of $7.5 million per day for 71 days would mean the department has spent roughly $532 million. By comparison, the Pentagon has been spending roughly $1.3 billion per week on Afghanistan, analysts said.

  • Defiant Gaza militants vow to rearm amid shaky truce
    Defiant Gaza militants vow to rearm amid shaky truce

    Thousands of militants paraded in the besieged Gaza Strip Friday, defiantly saying they would rearm as the prospects of a final deal on a long-term Israel-Hamas truce looked shaky. Thousands of Islamic Jihad fighters paraded through Gaza City in a show of force, marching with light weapons and holding aloft rockets similar to those fired at Israel during the conflict. His words echoed those of the exiled leader of Hamas, Gaza's de facto ruler.

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