Re: the Benghazi messages: Browse administration emails like an inbox

The 100 pages of emails that the White House released on Wednesday, which cover the administration's crafting of its talking points about the Sept. 11, 2012, attack in Benghazi, Libya, do not contain any clear indications of a political cover-up.

But they do indicate that the CIA, FBI, State Department and the White House operate with the same sort of office drudgery as workplaces across America. There are the same cascading CC lists, the guy who insists on formally addressing every email message to "Colleagues" and the incessant looping in of one more person as a decision impends.

The following interactive arranges the emails as a typical inbox, in date order. For the sake of simplicity, every email is included in one inbox instead of separate ones for different people. You can click the "From" or "Thread" bars to sort by those fields instead.

Letters in square brackets indicate that a person's name was redacted and replaced by a handwritten acronym representing the organization he or she works for.

Update, 12:43 p.m.: Now includes Brennan edits and Victoria Nuland's push back.

Update, 4:36 p.m.: Now half complete.

Update, May 17, 2012: All emails now digitized.

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