Upgrade Your Life
  • Notifications on your phone – a buzz, a beep, a pop-up alert – are fine if you actually want them, like when you get a new text. But what about all those annoying notifications? Do you really want to be interrupted every time an old high school friend posts something inane on Facebook? Good news: Turning off or limiting notifications on your smartphone is easy. Watch the video above to see how.

    On iPhones

    Go first to “Settings” then “Notifications.” Then scroll down through each IOS feature and app and turn off the ones that are annoyances rather than useful alerts. You can also tweak how they appear – as banners on top as pop-ups in the center of the screen. You can even decide if you want them to appear when the phone is locked. Again, the video above shows where in the menus to find these options.

    On Android phones

    On newer models go into settings, notifications and then turn off the annoying ones. On older versions of Android, you may need to first launch the offending app, then hit

    Read More »from Stop Annoying Phone “Notifications”
  • We’ve fallen in love with activity monitors like the FitBit and Nike Fuel Band that track your steps and graph how many calories you burn. The quantified life provides insight that can lead to healthier behavior. But would a gadget that tracks how much you drink work the same way?

    The BACtrack Mobile Breathalyzer – How it Works

    The $150 BACtrack connects to your smartphone via Bluetooth. Then you just download the app, enter your gender and weight – and blow into the hand-held device. It gives you a blood alcohol reading that is then saved in your phone. Less expensive (and less accurate) personal breathalyzers utilize a semiconductor sensor, but the BACtrack Mobile Breathalyzer uses a professional-grade, fuel cell sensor, the same technology used by law enforcement. That said, no breathalyzer is 100% accurate – defense attorneys routinely challenge their validity in court (blood tests are the gold standard). But while I wouldn’t bet my license – or someone’s life – on this device, it

    Read More »from Smartphone Device Tracks and SHARES Your Blood Alcohol Level
  • Which of these passwords is harder to crack?

    DOG!(!(!(!(!(! or PrXyc5NFn4k77

    Amazingly, it’s the easier-to-remember password. Watch the video above to find out why – and what it means for your password security.

    [Related: Is it Safe To Bank on Public Wi-Fi? How Not To Get Hacked! ]

    Password tricks


    Make passwords more secure:

    * Add letters: Since there are 26 letters in the alphabet, one additional letter can make your password much harder to crack.
    * Use a mix of lower and uppercase letters: Mixing up your cases adds complexity and safety to your chosen password.
    * Add numbers: Using letters, words, and phrases for your passwords seems both natural and easy to remember, but it's much safer to diversify.
    * Add symbols: Symbols are the real secret ingredient to security. Since there are over 1500 symbols a hacking program needs to run through to correctly lock down one character of your password, adding one extra asterisk or exclamation point can make it dramatically more difficult for

    Read More »from Trick for Safer, Easier-to-Remember Passwords

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(123 Stories)
  • Nasdaq stocks posting largest percentage decreases

    A look at the 10 biggest percentage decliners on Nasdaq at the close of trading: Birner Dental Management Services Inc. fell 9.8 percent to $15.50. Cellular Biomedicine fell 9.4 percent to $17.00. Capitol ...

  • Pentagon Tells Russia to Get the Hell Out of Ukraine
    Pentagon Tells Russia to Get the Hell Out of Ukraine

    The Pentagon on Friday condemned Russia for sending a 90-truck convoy into Ukraine without permission, calling it a "violation of Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity." Russia says the trucks are filled with humanitarian aid for Ukraine separatists fighting with Moscow's backing, but Ukraine and its allies, fearing that they contained a trojan horse, had warned that it would not allow the convoy in unless the supplies were handed over to the International Red Cross.

  • The biggest reason Microsoft has started targeting the MacBook Air
    The biggest reason Microsoft has started targeting the MacBook Air

    In case you haven’t been paying attention, there’s been a noticeable shift in the way Microsoft has been promoting its Surface line of tablets — instead of pitting it against the iPhone like it’s traditionally done, it’s started pitting it against the MacBook Air. This may seem a bit puzzling since Apple sells more iPads every year than it does MacBook Airs but it actually makes all the sense in the world, as an excellent analysis by ZDNet’s Ed Bott makes clear. While Apple doesn’t sell very many MacBooks per year when compared to Windows PCs, the ones it does sell are hugely profitable for the company. MacBook Airs and MacBook Pros are pricey items but Apple fans have shown

  • Russian aid trucks leave; Merkel seeks cease-fire
    Russian aid trucks leave; Merkel seeks cease-fire

    DONETSK, Russia (AP) — Hundreds of trucks from a bitterly disputed Russian aid convoy to rebel-held eastern Ukraine rolled back across the border Saturday into Russia but questions about alleged Russian artillery in Ukraine still remained.

  • James Foley’s Brother: The U.S. Could Have Done More for Jim
    James Foley’s Brother: The U.S. Could Have Done More for Jim

    For the first time since the Islamic militant group ISIL released the shocking video of the beheading of American journalist James Foley earlier this week, his brother and sister are speaking about their grief.

  • Pentagon cites 'dangerous' Chinese jet intercept
    Pentagon cites 'dangerous' Chinese jet intercept

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration on Friday accused a Chinese fighter jet of conducting a "dangerous intercept" of a U.S. Navy surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft off the coast of China in international airspace — the fourth such incident since March.

  • Puerto Ricans flock to US mainland as island crisis worsens
    Puerto Ricans flock to US mainland as island crisis worsens

    The island of Puerto Rico is depopulating, as residents stream to the US mainland fleeing the island's economic crisis and political gridlock in search of jobs. Since 2009, more Puerto Ricans have been living pn the American mainland than on the northeastern Caribbean US-territory, a trend that has accelerated in the years since, according to census figures complied by the Washington-based Pew Hispanic Center. In 2012, some 4.9 million Puerto Ricans lived in one of the 50 US states or the US capital, while the island had a population of 3.5 million, according to the study out this week. Furthermore, Puerto Rico lost another 144,000 people between 2010 and 2013.

  • Dutch say fight against Islamic State insurgents must go to Syria

    Dutch Foreign Minister Frans Timmermans said on Friday that the fight against Islamic State insurgents can only be successful if the jihadi militants are confronted in Syria as well as Iraq. Germany, Italy, Britain and the United States have said they are ready to send arms to bolster the capabilities of Iraqi Kurds fighting Islamic State in northern Iraq, and Washington has carried out several air strikes on IS positions there.

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