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  • Twitter’s much-heralded IPO has frothed the waters around this social media tool yet again. You may have avoided joining, but now that almost 50 million Americans use it, and three times that number use the microblog internationally, you may be wondering if there’s actually something valuable about Twitter that you’re missing.

    So what does it do well, and how do power users maximize its strengths?

    Current, Hyper-Local, First-Person Information

    218 million people use Twitter. 22% are in the US, and a whopping 78% are international users. And this global reach highlights some of Twitter’s greatest strengths. If you follow users who are in your area, Twitter offers a hyper-local news source that many parts of the world (and the United States) don’t have. Unlike newspapers, the information on Twitter comes through in real time. During an emergency or a live event, Twitter can be one of the most comprehensive sources of first-person information. On the down-side, this is not journalism; it

    Read More »from What Twitter Users Know That You Don’t
  • Be it robo calls, telemarketers, or an unfortunate interpersonal drama, sometimes you just need to block a specific phone number and prevent that individual from ever calling you again. Fortunately, there are easy ways to filter out those calls – and even unwanted text messages – on your cell phone.

    Caller ID only goes so far. Even if you choose not to answer them, unwanted calls are still an intrusion and – if you’re paying for talk minutes or texts – an expense. So here’s how to take care of the problem – and check out the video above to see exactly how it’s done:

    iPhone iOS 7 Solution

    Blocking calls on Apple’s new iPhone software iOS 7 is incredibly easy. Look in your recent call log and click the “i” next to the name or number you want to block. Scroll down and choose “Block this caller.” You won’t receive phone calls, voicemail, text messages or Facetime calls from this contact ever again. (Or at least until you make up – then you can unblock the number.)

    [Related: The New iPhones –

    Read More »from New Tools to Block Calls on Your Cell Phone
  • You bought an expensive smartphone, and you don’t want it to get scratched up in your purse or pocket. But do you need to add a screen protector? And can these thin pieces of plastic really help prevent cracks when you drop your phone?

    It’s All About The Glass

    Almost all new phones these days come with enhanced glass.  Whether it’s Corning’s Gorilla Glass or another manufacturer’s version, screen glass is chemically strengthened to create a barrier against scratches. Some phone manufacturers have even hinted they don’t think screen protectors do much good.

    [Related: The New iPhones – Should You Upgrade?]

    And I Don’t Like Screen Protectors

    Personally I am not a fan of screen protectors. Yes, they can help fight off fingerprints and reduce glare. But they are hard to apply, air bubbles get trapped under the plastic, and they don’t feel as smooth to the touch as the glass. But I like scratches and cracks even less.  So I’m willing to sacrifice a few phones to see how everyday and extreme

    Read More »from Scratch Test: Does Your Phone Really Need A Screen Protector?

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  • 10 Things to Know for Wednesday
    10 Things to Know for Wednesday

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:

  • Hungary's opposition asks EU to protect democracy
    Hungary's opposition asks EU to protect democracy

    BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — An opposition group said Tuesday it would ask the European Union to step up its oversight of democracy in Hungary after the prime minster said he wants to transform the country from a liberal democracy into an "illiberal state."

  • Mother Nature vs. Washington: “Deadliest Catch’s” Keith Colburn on the politics of crab fishing
    Mother Nature vs. Washington: “Deadliest Catch’s” Keith Colburn on the politics of crab fishing

    Captain Colburn talks crab fishing, Alaska politics, and the impact of climate change

  • Russia's Kalashnikov sends 'condolences' to sanction-struck U.S. consumers

    The Russian arms maker Kalashnikov expressed its sympathies on Tuesday to U.S. consumers who cannot buy the company's famous weapons because of U.S. sanctions over Ukraine. U.S. sanctions have struck some of Russia's most famous arms companies.

  • Sierra Leone's top Ebola doctor dies from virus

    By Umaru Fofana and Adam Bailes FREETOWN (Reuters) - The doctor leading Sierra Leone's fight against the worst Ebola outbreak on record died from the virus on Tuesday, the country's chief medical officer said. The death of Sheik Umar Khan, who was credited with treating more than 100 patients, follows those of dozens of local health workers and the infection of two American medics in neighboring Liberia, highlighting the dangers faced by staff trying to halt the disease's spread across West Africa. Ebola is believed to have killed 672 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since the outbreak began in February, according to the World Health Organisation. The contagious disease, which has no known cure, has symptoms that include vomiting, diarrhea and internal and external bleeding.

  • The Army’s New Handgun: A Weapon for Criminals?
    The Army’s New Handgun: A Weapon for Criminals?

    There’s a new semi-automatic handgun on the horizon for the Army that U.S. consumers may have access to almost immediately. The goal is to develop something far more advanced and powerful than the Cold-War era Beretta M9, which the Army has been using for nearly three decades. Since the Army is “the lead agent for small arms,” whatever weapon is produced would also have to meet “the needs of the other services,” reports Military.com. “The Army is seeking to replace the M9 and M11 pistols with a handgun that is more accurate, ergonomic, reliable and durable than the current pistol.”

  • Family finds 300-year-old sunken treasure off Florida's east coast

    By Barbara Liston ORLANDO Fla. (Reuters) - A Florida family scavenging for sunken treasure on a shipwreck has found the missing piece of a 300-year-old gold filigree necklace sacred to Spanish priests, officials said on Tuesday. Eric Schmitt, a professional salvager, was scavenging with his parents when he found the crumpled, square-shaped ornament on a leisure trip to hunt for artifacts in the wreckage of a convoy of 11 ships that sank in 1715 during a hurricane off central Florida's east coast. "It's priceless, unique, one of a kind," said Brent Brisben, operations manager for Queens Jewels, which owns rights to the wreckage, located in 15-foot (4.5-meter) deep Atlantic Ocean waters. Schmitt's parents have hunted for sunken treasure as a hobby for a decade.

  • Jury awards Ventura $1.8M in defamation case
    Jury awards Ventura $1.8M in defamation case

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Former Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura won $1.8 million Tuesday in his two-year fight to prove he was defamed by a military sniper and best-selling author who claimed to have punched out Ventura at a bar for bad-mouthing the Navy SEALs.

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