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  • 10 Things to Know for Today
    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

  • How your boss will run your life in a few years
    How your boss will run your life in a few years

    Want job security? Let your company monitor you 24/7.

  • Humans Did Not Wipe Out the Neanderthals, New Research Suggests
    Humans Did Not Wipe Out the Neanderthals, New Research Suggests

    Neanderthals went extinct in Europe about 40,000 years ago, giving them millennia to coexist with modern humans culturally and sexually, new findings suggest. This research also suggests that modern humans did not cause Neanderthals to rapidly go extinct, as some researchers have previously suggested, scientists added. Neanderthals are the closest extinct relatives of modern humans, and lived in Europe and Asia. Recent findings suggest that Neanderthals were closely related enough to interbreed with ancestors of modern humans — about 1.5 to 2.1 percent of the DNA of anyone outside Africa is Neanderthal in origin.

  • Airstrike kills wife and child of Hamas figure
    Airstrike kills wife and child of Hamas figure

    GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Hamas' shadowy military chief escaped an apparent Israeli assassination attempt that killed his wife and infant son, the militant group said Wednesday as Israel's prime minister warned that the bombardment of Gaza will continue until rocket fire out of the Palestinian territory stops.

  • U.S. military continues to strike Islamic State in Iraq -U.S. officials
    U.S. military continues to strike Islamic State in Iraq -U.S. officials

    The United States has been conducting attacks on Islamic State vehicles and other targets in northern Iraq since earlier this month, as the White House seeks to help Iraq push back militants who have poured into the country from neighboring Syria. In an act of apparent revenge for the strikes, the hardline Islamist group on Tuesday posted a video showing the beheading of American journalist James Foley, who disappeared while reporting in Syria in 2012.

  • Walgreen CFO's departure due to $1 billion forecasting error : WSJ

    (Reuters) - Drugstore retailer Walgreen Co's Chief Financial Officer, Wade Miquelon, and another top executive lost their jobs after a $1 billion forecasting error in the company's Medicare-related business, the Wall Street Journal reported. Walgreen named Kraft Foods Group Inc's former CFO, Timothy McLevish, to replace Miquelon — its CFO of six years — on Aug. 4. Miquelon last month cut by $1.1 billion a forecast of $8.5 billion in pharmacy unit earnings for the year ending August 2016 that he had made at an April board meeting, the journal said.

  • Climbers Paint Ukraine Colors and Plant Flag on Top of a Moscow Skyscraper
    Climbers Paint Ukraine Colors and Plant Flag on Top of a Moscow Skyscraper

    A Stalin-era Moscow skyscraper was defiled redecorated by a crew of intrepid alpinists-protestors who scaled to the top of a 580-foot building and painted it Ukrainian blue before hoisting up a Ukrainian flag. Someone climbed the Moscow skyscraper on Kotelnicheskaya and put up a Ukrainian flag. Russian authorities were not amused by the prank in support of Ukraine, where government troops are battling pro-Russian separatists. "Obviously, the star was intended to be painted in the Ukrainian flag's colors," the source said." 

  • Adversaries seize chance to lecture U.S. on Ferguson unrest
    Adversaries seize chance to lecture U.S. on Ferguson unrest

    By Angus MacSwan LONDON (Reuters) - Governments scolded by the United States over their human rights records have seized on racial unrest and a police crackdown in the Missouri town of Ferguson to wag their fingers back in disapproval. Adversaries and uneasy allies from Russia and Iran to China and Egypt have accused the United States of hypocrisy as images of police brandishing lethal weapons and tear-gassing protesters have been shown around the world. Many of the countries draw criticism of their own democratic credentials from independent rights group as well as the U.S. Nonetheless, activists say the events in Ferguson, where the shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman has provoked 11 nights of protests, undermine the United States' credibility in criticizing others.

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