Burger King's Twitter Account Hacked

ABC News
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Rising Hack Attacks Prompt Concern (ABC News)

You could call it the Big Mac of Twitter hacks. Burger King's Twitter (@burgerking) account was hacked today. The account, which had more than 89,000 followers and was verified by Twitter, was made to look like McDonald's with a McDonald's logo.

The hacker posted tweets that Burger King had been sold to McDonald's and the account had been taken over by McDonald's employees. "We just got sold to McDonalds! Look for McDonalds in a hood near you @DFNCTSC," the hacker tweeted at 12:01 p.m. ET. @DFNCTSC is likely an account set up by the hacker. Several of the posts used obscenities or racial epithets.

For over an hour the feed was filled with photos and videos making fun of Burger King. "We caught one of our employees in the bathroom doing this…." one of the tweets said. Along with it was a photo of a man injecting a syringe into his arm. Twitter users immediately noticed something odd going on:

Somebody needs to tell Burgerking that 'whopper123' isn't a secure password.

— Simon Osborne (@flibblesan) February 18, 2013

.@ burgerking's twitter just got hacked and is currently hilarious.

— Daniel Dennis Jones (@blanket) February 18, 2013

The account was finally suspended about an hour after the initial posts. McDonald's official Twitter account took the opportunity to make sure its followers knew it had nothing to do with the hack.

We empathize with our @ burgerking counterparts. Rest assured, we had nothing to do with the hacking.

— McDonald's (@McDonalds) February 18, 2013

A few hours after the attack, Burger King apologized in a statement. "It has come to our attention that the Twitter account of the BURGER KING brand has been hacked. We have worked directly with administrators to suspend the account until we are able to re-establish our legitimate site and authentic postings," the company said. "We apologize to our fans and followers who have been receiving erroneous tweets about other members of our industry and additional inappropriate topics."

Earlier this month, Twitter reported 250,000 account passwords had been compromised by hackers. Twitter would not comment directly on the hack. " We don't comment on individual accounts for privacy and security reasons," a Twitter spokesperson told ABC News.

The Burger King hack was the most prominent since last year when several Major League Baseball accounts were taken over by a hacker. The New York Yankees' Twitter account reported at the time that shortstop Derek Jeter would be undergoing a sex change.

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